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Sleeping Gear The Sleeping Gear forum is for the discussion of sleeping gear (bags, mats, quilts...).


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  #11  
Old 02-02-2013, 08:00 AM
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corey corey is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 5
I use a compactor bag to line my pack (which has been modified to drain water) and just stuff the quilt into the bottom to take advantage of it's ability to mold to whatever space is there. Items added on top provide any needed compression as I repack.
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  #12  
Old 09-06-2013, 07:40 PM
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Wildfield Wildfield is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 131
How do you pack your sleeping bag?

New Guy question.

I have a backpack that has a "sleeping bag compartment". I like it! I like that I don't have to pull out all my other gear to remove or to pack my sleeping bag.

All of the lighter weight packs I have been looking at don't have a sleeping bag compartment. If I owned one of these packs, I would imagine my bag stowed at the bottom of my pack. To get my bag out, I would have to remove all (or most) of the contents.

How do you all pack your sleeping bags? And, is it that big a deal to get at it, if you pack it at the bottom of your pack?

Does anyone else like the sleeping bag compartment feature? Or is this mainly a novice hang up?

Darryl
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  #13  
Old 09-06-2013, 07:53 PM
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Grandpa Grandpa is offline
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Backpack: GoLite Pinnacle
Sleeping Gear: Moonstone Lucid 800 w/Neo Air pad
Shelter: Tarptent Sublite Tyvek & Tarptent Double Rainbow
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 430
My pack doesn't have a sleeping bag compartment so the bag goes in the bottom of the pack, where it is the last thing I'll need to pull out and the first thing I need to put back in. Having it on the bottom of the pack doesn't bother me a bit.

The packs I started backpacking with over forty years ago all had sleeping bag compartments and full frames. I hike with less than half the weight I carried then.

Of course, if you see my avatar you understand why I need half the weight... I still end up with a load on my back!
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  #14  
Old 09-09-2013, 09:51 AM
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richwads richwads is offline
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Shelter: Tarp
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: California
Posts: 483
Like Grandpa, I prefer having my sleeping bag in the bottom of the pack. Above it are packed a sleeping pad, a clothing bag, cook kit ditty bag, and food. Since the sleeping bag only comes out when I want to sleep, but the other stuff comes out sooner, I have never been unsatisfied with this system. This only works because the shelter and ground cloth are in outside pouches and the lid has a pocket with a lot of little stuff in it (sunglasses, headlamp, sanitary/first aid, etc.).

Also, clothes that I might need on the spur of the moment (wind shirt, rain gear) are kept accessible without opening the pack.

I can see that there may be reasons to want the sleeping bag out before the other stuff, but I also appreciate the protection from weather that comes from having it in the bottom of the pack. I think a zipper-accessed sleeping bag compartment may be subject to rain infiltration.
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  #15  
Old 09-10-2013, 07:22 PM
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Wildfield Wildfield is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 131
Thank for your replies and information. You both make great points.

I have drawn the conclusion that I should just try it.

On the one hand, the thought of dumping out the contents of my pack to get my sleeping bag in or out of my pack seems counter intuitive. On the other hand, in my recent outings, I haven’t packed much stuff so I guess even if I have to remove everything...it's actually not that much.

Thanks again for your feedback!

Darryl
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  #16  
Old 09-10-2013, 09:30 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildfield
Thank for your replies and information. You both make great points.

I have drawn the conclusion that I should just try it.

On the one hand, the thought of dumping out the contents of my pack to get my sleeping bag in or out of my pack seems counter intuitive. On the other hand, in my recent outings, I haven’t packed much stuff so I guess even if I have to remove everything...it's actually not that much.

Thanks again for your feedback!

Darryl


i'm a bottom of the pack, no compartment kind of guy. all my stuff is broken down into individual clusters. mess cluster. bed cluster. clothing cluster. (shelter is typically stored in an exterior pocket). they all get their own bags.

so i suppose i do a sort of compartmented storage anyways.

that said, dry bags/stuff sacks aren't that expensive. pack the pack in reverse order of setting up camp so that tent comes out first and gets set up. mess cluster comes out so you can make dinner. clothing cluster comes out and goes into tent to be ready. bed cluster does the same.

sounds anal, but it makes for easy camp.
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  #17  
Old 09-14-2013, 06:38 PM
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Wildfield Wildfield is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
that said, dry bags/stuff sacks aren't that expensive. pack the pack in reverse order of setting up camp so that tent comes out first and gets set up. mess cluster comes out so you can make dinner. clothing cluster comes out and goes into tent to be ready. bed cluster does the same.

Sounds like good advice...thank you!

I did by a waterproof sil-nylon stuff sack today (Sea to Summit). Nice stuff sack but adds almost 6 ounces. I rationalize that the +6oz will be worth it, if it keeps my bag dry.

Someday I'll evolve to the no-sleeping-bag-compartment and (lighter weight) trash compactor bag to keep it all dry method. Until then....
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  #18  
Old 09-15-2013, 01:11 AM
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GGervin GGervin is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Forums Moderator
Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
Sleeping Gear: REI ThermoPod +0 mummy, MH 3D +40 mummy
Shelter: SD Superflash, GoLite Hut 1
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: California
Posts: 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildfield
I rationalize that the +6oz will be worth it, if it keeps my bag dry.
There's no rationalization at all in your thinking, only practicality. I've literally soaked a sleeping bag only once, and I'll never forget it. 0 degree 4lb. synthetic bag dry, only God knows how heavy when fully wet. But due to a series of misfortunes, it did get fully soaked, and I had to carry it and sleep in it. I can guarantee it was way more than 6 oz., and the dryer the bag, the happier you will sleep.

Sea-to-Summit makes good stuff, especially the light dry-bags. Have several myself. Here's to hoping you don't find out how important a dry sleeping bag is...
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  #19  
Old 09-16-2013, 11:57 AM
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dustin dustin is offline
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Backpack: Golite Jam
Sleeping Gear: Golite quilt
Shelter: SMD Gatewood Cape
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Lakewood, CO
Posts: 36
I happened to find a pillow stuff sack that's slightly larger than the stuff sack that came with the quilt. It's silnylon outside and microfleece inside (and vice versa at night). It's slightly easier to stuff the quilt, plus it's nicer on the face.

My hope was that it would keep the bag dry if rain actually soaked through the outside of the backpack, but I was relieved it kept the bag dry when my backup bladder leaked a puddle inside the pack.

I think I'll use a pack liner next time. The bladder leak freaked me a little. I really don't want to find out firsthand how wet down performs.
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  #20  
Old 09-22-2013, 10:06 AM
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HighMiler HighMiler is offline
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Backpack: Trailwise External-Frame with various bags
Sleeping Gear: Down-filled Quilts
Shelter: Tarp
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Twisp, WA
Posts: 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by dustin
I happened to find a pillow stuff sack that's slightly larger than the stuff sack that came with the quilt. It's silnylon outside and microfleece inside (and vice versa at night). It's slightly easier to stuff the quilt, plus it's nicer on the face.

My hope was that it would keep the bag dry if rain actually soaked through the outside of the backpack, but I was relieved it kept the bag dry when my backup bladder leaked a puddle inside the pack.

I think I'll use a pack liner next time. The bladder leak freaked me a little. I really don't want to find out firsthand how wet down performs.

Wet down simply doesn't perform. Having said that, I can also say that in 54 years of carrying down bags, I've only had a really wet bag once -- but after ten days in a snow cave, everything was pretty soggy. It was time to leave.

Your leaking hydration bladder is not uncommon from what I've heard. A companion recently had water dripping out of his pack as he walked ahead of me up the trail. He was not a happy camper. I'm still a bottle-baby, I guess.

My down bag is always protected in waterproof bags. Compressed tightly when needed, loosely packed when room is available. Mostly in the last few years, I pack light in a big pack bag, so my sleeping bag starts out pretty loose in the bottom. But it moves up, along with other items I'll need quickly, if I'm going to be walking until dark. I've never really wanted or needed to get my bag out first -- usually it's whatever shelter i'm using -- hammock, bivy sack, tarp, tent -- then my pad and bag.

Lastly, I normally use that zippered "sleeping bag" compartment at the bottom of some of my packs for stuff that gets and/or is wet. Zippers leak.
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