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Gear List The Gear List forum is the place to post your actual backpacking gear list, and to read what others have in their packs. Don't forget to specify weight.


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  #1  
Old 08-05-2012, 06:35 PM
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pxranger pxranger is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2012
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My First Gear List

I am somewhat new to backpacking, However I have been in the Army for 12 years (Infantry). I started backpacking for something that me and my 2 boys could enjoy together. Here is my pack setup. Note that the sleep system is tailored for the weather. My pack weighed in at 70lbs with food and water. This is much lighter than what I am used to carrying. Im not concerned about being ultralight as I am used to such loads, so no flaming me about the weight. I didn't add clothes and food to my list as I am still developing those items. Useful feedback welcomed.

Aether 85
Hennessey Explorer Asym Zip
Sea to Summit SM Compression sack
Sea to Summit SM Compression sack
MSR Alpine 1.6L Stowaway pot
MSR Dragonfly Stove
MSR Flex Skillet
Themarest Pillow (L)
Thermarest Trail Pro (L)
Adventure Medical Kit .9
Gear Aid Repair Kit Explorer
Packtowl Personal (L)
REI Tent Stake Bag
MSR Groundhog stakes (6)
Katadyn Pocket Water Filter
MSR 11oz Fuel Bottle
MSR 20oz Fuel Bottle
Princton Tec Remix Pro
Spyderco Endura
Gerber Multitool
Leatherman Micra
Light My Fire Flint Steel
MSR Dragonfly Parts Kit
Gerber Camp Axe
Camelbak 1L Water Bottle
MSR 6L Dromedary Bag
MSR 4L Dromedary Bag
Camelbak 100oz Resivoir
Toilet Paper in Ziplock Bag
Surefire C2 Centurion W/ LED Kit
Hennessey Hex Rainfly
Army Poncho Liner
Army Sleep System
Garmin Rhino 520
Glock 23 W/3 13Rnd Mags
Sea to Summit XS Dry Sack
Small Tinder Box
Sea to Summit Spoon, Fork, Knife Set
MSR Alpinist Spatula
GSI Salt/Pepper Shaker
MSR TR-3 Trekking Poles

Just a note, I dont carry both fuel bottles, My oldest son carries one for a spare.

Last edited by pxranger : 08-05-2012 at 06:39 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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  #2  
Old 08-05-2012, 06:43 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
i'm no lightweighter either.

11 liters of water tho, is pretty thorough. i think most of us run at most half that, but hey, tastes and styles.

i will point out that you can have a scalable tailorable sleep system over the issue-spec system that would be at most half as bulky.

it IS spendy however.

glock 23? interesting choice for hiking.
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  #3  
Old 08-05-2012, 06:50 PM
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pxranger pxranger is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 6
Yeah, The sleep system is the next to go. I will most likely get an underquilt and an overquilt setup since im using a hammock. As far as the glock, I never leave home without it. Hopefully I will never need it, but when I run into a situation where I need it, I will be glad its there. I just refuse to be a victim.

As far as the water, the 6L is packed in empty. Its for cooking and cleaning water. I bought my oldest a Gravity works filter that we use on site to fill the 6L for cooking/cleaning/showering.

Last edited by pxranger : 08-05-2012 at 06:53 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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  #4  
Old 08-05-2012, 07:09 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
fair enough. two spare magazines might be overkill tho.

interesting use for the large bladder. i could see that being adapted into a shower pretty easily. easier than my silnylon bucket, that's for sure.


on the carry vein: if you wanted to really mix practical and pleasure, a mid-size .357 is a great option for a handful of reasons:

plenty of defensive punch, easily on par with/superior to .40 S&W depending on what ammo you use. the heavy double-action pull on the first round in a panic situation can be a godsend if you have to stop pulling RIGHT NOW.

about the same weight.

a touch less threatening to see on the trail than a matte black people-popper, while being quite remarkably intimidating when pointed. something about seeing the other bullets.

you can get a big pile of .38 special brass, a bullet-mold and caster, and make plinking ammo to use with the kids. if you can recover some of the lead you're recycling like crazy and it becomes extremely cheap to keep the plinking side fed. a semi-wadcutter bullet on top of a low-power powder load makes an awesome rabbit/small game bullet.

revolver has a lot less issue with shotshells to use on snakes.


that said, a quality .357 doesn't come exactly cheap tho.


how's that dragonfly been treating you? i've been looking at those for a loooong time.
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  #5  
Old 08-05-2012, 07:30 PM
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pxranger pxranger is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 6
I've had my Dragonfly for 12 Years. It has never failed me. I love the dual flame adjustment.

.357 would be a good choice, but then I would have to buy dies for my dillon. I carry concealed on the trail as not to freak anyone out. Agreed, however about the mags, I will most likely leave one at home next time. Still its not as wild as my sons idea that we should take the AR with us. Imagine the looks that would get, lol

My dad has a .357 and has dies already, hmmm maybe I will start looking at .357's. Can't have too many. Plus variety is good.

Last edited by pxranger : 08-05-2012 at 07:38 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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  #6  
Old 08-05-2012, 07:49 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
Quote:
Originally Posted by pxranger
I've had my Dragonfly for 12 Years. It has never failed me. I love the dual flame adjustment.

.357 would be a good choice, but then I would have to buy dies for my dillon. I carry concealed on the trail as not to freak anyone out. Agreed, however about the mags, I will most likely leave one at home next time. Still its not as wild as my sons idea that we should take the AR with us. Imagine the looks that would get, lol

My dad has a .357 and has dies already, hmmm maybe I will start looking at .357's. Can't have too many. Plus variety is good.


the slim lines and natural ergonomics in a mid-frame revolver make for a really pleasant carry. great bang for the buck comes in a ruger, GP101 series in a 4" barrel is as good as it gets.


pretty thorough packout, though, bravo zulu on covering the bases.
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  #7  
Old 08-06-2012, 11:15 AM
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EagleRiverDee EagleRiverDee is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Regular Member
Backpack: Granite Gear Vapor Trail
Sleeping Gear: BA Q-Core SL, WM Versalite
Shelter: Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Eagle River, Alaska
Posts: 82
Hike your own hike- if you're comfortable with that weight, great. You don't mention the duration of your trip, distance, or access to water which would be helpful. No way would I carry more than 2 liters of water, personally, but I live in Alaska and we're never more than a few miles from the next water source here. If you're hiking in the desert, then your 11L system may be a good idea.

I will put a plug here for the MSR Pocket Rocket. I have an MSR DragonFly and I love it, and if you're going on a long trip or if this is a winter pack than the DragonFly is still a great option. If this is a weekend trip, you might want to consider the PocketRocket. It's cheap, it has an adjustable flame, the boil time is similar to the DragonFly (and it's about as loud, to boot), but it's much lighter and takes up less space in the pack. My DragonFly still has it's place but the PocketRocket has become my stove of choice for shorter 3 season trips.

Why so much ammo? I carry a firearm and think they're a good choice for predator protection but that's a lot of ammo. I generally just have either the one clip (in my semi) or the cylinder (in my revolver) loaded and call it good.
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  #8  
Old 08-06-2012, 12:59 PM
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pxranger pxranger is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 6
As far as 11L I did mention that the 6L is packed in empty. I have 2 boys. My youngest shares some water with me. As far as ammo, I have taken a few courses in defensive and tactical shooting. One of the things I learned was that if you are ever unfortunate enough to find yourself in a gun fight, I for one would like to have one round more than the bad guy. Just personal preference.

Duration is currently limited to just a few days. Around 10 miles per day. I stick with the dragonfly because its easy to dial it down to a very small flame to turn it over to the next person to use it. The last hike we had 6 people and just my stove. Not to mention that ive had it for over a decade and it is a dependable workhorse.

In addition I just don't like fuel canisters, less waste involved in filling my fuel bottles.

As far as access to water, it is always nearby. I just havent built up enough confidence in my filter yet to drop the water. I am sure with more experience that will change, but for now I would rather my kids drink from a known source of clean water. But time will tell.

Last edited by pxranger : 08-06-2012 at 01:08 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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  #9  
Old 08-06-2012, 01:42 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
Quote:
Originally Posted by pxranger

As far as access to water, it is always nearby. I just havent built up enough confidence in my filter yet to drop the water. I am sure with more experience that will change, but for now I would rather my kids drink from a known source of clean water. But time will tell.

this is pretty sound thinking. if at all possible i try to pack all my water in, at least for weekenders. i have a lot of faith in the chlorine dioxide(learned about it here, bloody good stuff...) but if i can mitigate risk..

Quote:
I generally just have either the one clip (in my semi) or the cylinder (in my revolver) loaded and call it good.

always interesting to see differing theories here. depending on the semiautomatic, i would carry just one magazine(a 1911 would get two magazines), but with a revolver i would carry spare ammunition. i suppose part of it is 'all is well and good till an angel pisses in your powder' or something like that. i like having the backup much of the time, but, ammunition weighs and adds up really fast. i love carrying plinking ammo, but depending on the gun that can really add up. with my .270 it's nearly an ounce a round, and even if i'm no ultralighter, that does somewhat temper the desire to carry a lot with me. .45acp ammo is almost as heavy, per round. .357 is about 3/4 that, give or take.


a note on plinking: px, you're probably already aware of how the .40 S&W as a round is sensitive to proper bullet seating which makes reloading a little more of a pain in the butt. i can vouch for how incredibly tolerant .38/.357 is to being jostled around in transport. makes all-lead rounds pretty practical(if mistreated too heavily they can shift in the casing which in .40 is a bad bad thing).
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  #10  
Old 08-06-2012, 05:48 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Oregon
Posts: 4,954
Thanks for sharing your gear list, pxranger.

Do you carry any map sheets (sections) and a compass, or do you primarily rely on your Garmin?

Have you been able to put your current gear list to use lately? If so, were there any issues that came up that you thought about re-addressing (e.g. item change,...)?

Reality
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