Practical Backpacking™ Forums

Welcome to Practical Backpacking™ Forums (PBF).

You are currently viewing PBF as a guest which has limited access. By becoming a PBF member, you will have full access to view and participate in tens of thousands of informative discussions, to view links and attachments (photos), and will gain access to other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free! Click to Become a PBF Member! Be sure to also explore the Practical Backpacking Podcast.


Go Back   Practical Backpacking™ Forums > Practical Backpacking™ General Outdoors (Backpacking Related) > Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills
HOME FAQ PBF GUIDELINES BLOG PODCAST GALLERY STORE CALENDAR Mark Forums Read

Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills The Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills forum is for discussion (on-site content) that directly relates to ancient and/or primitive style bushcraft/wilderness skills (e.g. firecraft, foraging, natural material construction, modern/primitive tools, long-term wilderness survival,...).


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 02-05-2012, 01:31 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
garethw garethw is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 20
hi there
If I'm not hiking far, I'll often carry a small forest type axe, for splitting larger logs. But for the final sizing for a fire batonning is my chosen method. I don't consider this, "abusing" the knife in any way. It is a tool that is made for a job and for me getting wood to kindling size batonning is the easiest and most effective way.
I take care of the knife, cleaning, avoiding rust and keeping the edge razor sharp.
I don't whack into big logs, where an axe is more apporopriate, but when I have small logs in the 3-6 inch range, that I've cut with a small saw, batonning gets them to a size where I can light a fire.
My Mora is 3 years old now, has seen loads of use and is still as good as new.

cheers
Gareth
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 02-05-2012, 04:42 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Bushwalker Bushwalker is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: New South Wales
Posts: 275
I do notice when I read through various "bushcraft" texts from different countries, that "battoning" seems to be largely confined to those books from North America ~ the USA and Canada...

As I inferred earlier, when you look to other countries you find their fashion shifts more towards small axes, machetes, and some of those larger local-native-styled big knives that one sees from Asia and the Pacific..

I have also noticed that some models of sheath knives ~ those with thicker backs and a mild tapered-wedge cross-section, like Ka-Bars and certain Buck and Gerber models, are actually advertised as being "suitable for battoning" in their spec's.

Last edited by Bushwalker : 02-05-2012 at 04:51 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 02-05-2012, 05:44 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Ralph Ralph is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Valued Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 503
The earliest tool used for batoning that I am aware of is the froe. The froe has a sharpened, straight blade with an eye on one side for a wooden handle at 90 degrees to the blade. In use, the froe is positioned on a wood block and struck with a froe club (not a mallet). The froe club is made from a length of dense hardwood (I used a branch of hornbeam) with a handle carved in one end. The principal uses are to work up kindling, make cedar shake/shingles and making clapboards. Kephart's book, Woodcraft goes into detail about these uses.

Splitting wood with a baton is safer and can easily be done under cover (inside or in a tent) since you are not swinging a blade around to do it.

Hitting a precise spot with an axe requires skill and considerable practice. A safer variant is to lightly strike the billet to seat the edge, push the handle to touch the billet and then swing billet and axe together against a firm surface. This is particularly suitable for the hand axe and wood up to maybe 3-4" in diameter.
Reply With Quote
Please Click to Visit These Sites
  #14  
Old 02-05-2012, 05:57 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Reality Reality is offline
PBF Administrator & PB Podcast Host
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Oregon
Posts: 4,954
Thanks for the favorites shared thus far. Anyone else have a favorite folder that is carried/used for bushcraft.

Keep in mind, it's not all about managing firewood.

Reality
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 02-14-2012, 11:28 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
i swear by my issue pocketknife. it's one of the stainless numbers with the reverse checking and US stamped in the side.

it's in fact one of the very last ones made by camillus before they shut down operations back in what was it now, 2000, 2001?

it's hardly any sort of heavy-duty knife. it IS however a fantastic can/bottle opener, a decent screwdriver, makes a perfectly serviceable striker for a firesteel, and the knife's pretty good to boot. 3" blade, sharp enough to have left me with a permanent scar where i was stupid, and it takes an edge nice and easy.

never go camping without it. it'll shave down wood to tinder, start a fire, prep dinner(canned or fresh), crack a beer, more or less in that order.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 04-13-2012, 07:54 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Grinder Grinder is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 20
I have been using the Benchmade 275 Adamas...beast of a knife, great for hard use!
Reply With Quote
Please Consider PBF Partners
The Paleo Recipe Book
  #17  
Old 04-15-2012, 12:17 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Wilder Wilder is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Oregon
Posts: 48
Until recently, I always took the Buck Hunter (110) I bought in 1965. It still goes car camping, along with the 40-some year old incredibly well endowed swiss army knife.

For backpacking, I'm transitioning to a mora, but I often miss my old friend.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 04-15-2012, 06:19 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilder
well endowed swiss army knife.


GiS for a 'well endowed swiss army knife':




what, no wood chipper?


i've been thinking about picking up a benchmade or a crkt folder for lighter utility duties on hunting trips. they're very nice knives, i must admit.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 04-15-2012, 08:48 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Wilder Wilder is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Oregon
Posts: 48
Yeah, that's the guy. It's great for keeping the newspaper from blowing away.
Reply With Quote
Your Visit to These Sites Helps Support PBF
  #20  
Old 04-17-2012, 07:00 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
beekeeper beekeeper is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Regular Member
Backpack: Golite Galaxy
Sleeping Gear: Hammock peapod
Shelter: Tarp
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Fairview, TX
Posts: 106
Wow! How do you even hold on to that guy?
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
SL3 Swedish Firesteel Folding Knife Reality General Gear Discussion 7 07-28-2013 12:39 PM
The Wenger Ranger Knife Ralph General Gear Discussion 2 07-24-2013 10:40 AM
KaBar Adventure Piggyback Knife Ralph Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills 0 10-31-2010 06:43 AM
Sheath for Mora Knife Reality Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills 6 10-25-2010 05:17 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:50 AM.

Backpacking Forums


Powered by vBulletin Version 3.5.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2006-2017 Practical Backpacking™
Practical Backpacking is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacker is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Podcast is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Magazine is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™