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Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills The Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills forum is for discussion (on-site content) that directly relates to ancient and/or primitive style bushcraft/wilderness skills (e.g. firecraft, foraging, natural material construction, modern/primitive tools, long-term wilderness survival,...).


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  #1  
Old 10-07-2011, 12:46 AM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Ultralight Bushcraft Kit (Gear List)

In another thread, I raised the issue of durable gear (perhaps heavier than normally carried) for use in the long-term.

In this thread, please share any bushcraft gear items that you have selected (or would choose) as ultralight options over heavier items.

Consider a situation in which you need to bug-out indefinitely and would like to go as light as possible - without making any significant gear sacrifices (or relying too heavily upon the possibility of improvisation).

For example, what would you use carry for winter (cold) weather sleeping gear and clothing (including footwear)? Would you carry a wood stove, or just cook over a campfire? Would you opt for a large knife and leave your hatchet behind?

Thanks for your participation.

Reality
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  #2  
Old 11-25-2011, 02:29 AM
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Debkirk Debkirk is offline
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Reality, as usual has an excellent point in searching for that which is durable. Living in Hurricane Alley such as I do, a 'survival kit' kind of has to double as a 'Go- Bag'. Consequently, Durable + Ultralight = Expensive, but you get what you pay for. Quick and dirty, here is my basic list:
Spyderco Endura folding knife: $65.00
Brunton Raptor butane stove : $50.00
2 small fuel cans: $5.00 ea
Snowpeak cookset with Spork $60.00 (titanium)
REI Halfdome 2+ tent: $200.00
Petzl head light: $40.00
Katadyn Hiker Pro H20 filter $70.00
50 feet of PMI 550 cord: $6.00
There it is. Now this base kit provides the 4 C's, cutting tool, cover, cordage, and combustion. Everything else depends on the season, length of trip (or crisis). Down here in Texas, you don't need a sleeping bag except in Winter and you don't need mosquito next except in Summer.
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  #3  
Old 11-25-2011, 09:35 PM
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SSDD SSDD is offline
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Ti-Tri Caldera cook system or a Vortex Cylinder Stove depending on the area of Op.
Mini works filter (don't leave home without it )
A Mid style shelter
0-10 deg down quilt
Exped UL short
3600-4200ci UL pack
Merino wool
Insulated GTX style boots
7" fixed blade
bow saw
A few Snares 1/4" down to 1/16" cable
100' 550 cord
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Old 06-03-2013, 08:27 AM
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Barbarian Barbarian is offline
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It's difficult to go UL for indefinite bug-out purposes, IMHO. To me, it would be easier to pack heavier and leave gear at camp, as well as accumulating and building further accoutrements AS you camp (better cookware, fire/tinder kit, permanent shelter, etc.) Continuous travel would necessitate carrying more gear.

While trying to stick to the idea of the thread, here's my list:

Fixed blade knife w/ 4" blade. (I've become used to processing firewood with this.)
Ferro Rod
Petroleum Jelly-Infused Cotton
Poncho & Liner
2 Canteens and 1 Cup
American Kami Ti Spoon
50' of 550 Cord
2 Pair Smartwool Socks
1 Change of Clothes
Petzl Tikka 2
Cash and Documentation
Half a Toothbrush
Quarter Bar of Soap
Compass & Map

Last edited by Barbarian : 06-03-2013 at 08:33 AM.
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  #5  
Old 06-03-2013, 02:28 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barbarian
It's difficult to go UL for indefinite bug-out purposes, IMHO.
Ultralight (UL) is quite subjective. Moreover, it also varies depending on what it's applied to -- lightweight bushcraft gear is likely to be different type of gear than ultralight backpacking.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Barbarian
2 Canteens and 1 Cup
An example: A couple disposable water bottles can last a century, if cared for appropriately - and they can be 1/2 pound lighter than a couple of the prevailing canteen options. This is merely an example. If someone prefers canteens, then that's what s/he should carry.

Reality
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  #6  
Old 06-03-2013, 06:21 PM
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richwads richwads is offline
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Just musing here . . . I can see an application where "light weight" rather than "durable" would be valuable in a bushcraft situation. Like where one would have to move often and unpredictably. Having too much stuff might result in much of it being left behind. So with that scenario:

I think I would end up using the same type of gear I usually take backpacking (my 2 season base weight without food or water is around 14.5 lb). I would still take a down bag, capilene and merino base layers, ti cookware, etc.

BUT I would take more of most things. More than one fixed blade knife (various sizes), more than one cookpot (pots, pan, lids), a sturdier, bigger ground sheet, more than one spare pair of underwear and socks. A bigger version of the Ti Bushcooker stove I now use - for cooking with wood.

AND I would take sturdier, more redundant versions of other things. Stainless steel water bottle in addition to plastic, a warmer sleeping bag with sturdier fabric (my old 20 deg bag). I might want to take my Shangrila 3 pyramid tent rather than the tarp I usually carry, for increased security against bad weather.

Extra categories of items would be:

Sawvivor 15" (remember- this is fast and light)

A firearm would be the lightest version I could find, like a Savage Rascal single shot .22 rifle at 2.5 lbs, or a Marlin Papoose or AR-7.

Having a sturdier pack with the above gear would probably more than double my base weight. Add 10 lbs of food and that's a heavy pack for my 130 lb to carry. Prob'ly why I don't do it .

But if I had to . . . . .
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Old 06-04-2013, 12:18 PM
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Bushwalker Bushwalker is offline
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I would still stick pretty much to my usual "essentials" concept, for this kind of preparations ~ such as:

A pocket knife and a fixed-blade knife;
Add: a small axe for those extended and 'forced' trips (and a file..);
2x 50' hanks of Twine, and some duct or strapping tape (much more versatile and practical than 500' of paracord weighing you down);
Firestarter and tinder (e.g. cotton balls w. petroleum jelly);
First aid kit; plus extra antibiotics and 2 or 3 sahets of electrolyes;
Water and a water purifier/filter, plus 'Steritabs' or similar;
A flashlight and/or headlamp;
Maps and compass;
And a light tarp or bivy sack could be a handy shelter, if expecting harsh conditions...
Clothes ~ layered clothing that can be built up for cold and wet conditions (a rainjacket and pants, and a set or two of thermals) and stripped downfor hot days; both a brimmed hat for daytime and a beanie for evenings; well-padded boots for walking, and sandals or light shoes to give your feet, and the boots, a rest at the end of the day..
Food ~ enough for 4-5 days.


I have to gag sometimes at some of the more extreme "bug out bags" that I see some people posting on some of those more paranoid "survivalist" and "TEOTWAWKI" websites and YouTube posts. Many of them would be groaning under their 150 lb loads ~ especially after loading up their M-15, shottie, 4 man expedition tent, and their "essentia"l 'nuclear-powered water purifier and cellphone rechargers' for a 3 day trip away from home...

I have to wonder how far some of those cityslicker Rambos would be stumbling down the track before eventually dropping their load, to run away screaming and hide behind the nearest tree..
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  #8  
Old 06-07-2013, 07:17 AM
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Barbarian Barbarian is offline
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Quote:
Ultralight (UL) is quite subjective. Moreover, it also varies depending on
what it's applied to -- lightweight bushcraft gear is likely to be different
type of gear than ultralight backpacking.


An example: A couple disposable water bottles can last a century, if cared
for appropriately - and they can be 1/2 pound lighter than a couple of the
prevailing canteen options. This is merely an example. If someone prefers
canteens, then that's what s/he should carry.

Reality

Ah, I understand. I was applying the same standard as UL backpacking. My mistake. I'll certainly add to the above list then.
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