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Backcountry Kitchen The Backcountry Kitchen forum is for the discussion of food and cooking gear related topics for backpacking trips (e.g. menus, recipes, stoves, fuel...).


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  #11  
Old 06-09-2011, 01:53 PM
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miltoncross miltoncross is offline
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In the morning, I drink Chinese green tea (a few different types). I really like to bring along the fresher loose tea rather than store-bought brands of green tea. So what I've taken to doing is hand-packing a bunch of tea bags using Rishi Loose Leaf Tea Bags.

I prefer the ease of clean-up this way, and the bags weigh almost nothing.

In the evening or with dinner, I like roasted barley tea (mugicha is the Japanese term). I also bring some of the bags pre-packed with this.

Reality, if you wanted iced green tea, you could just brew a few cups, put it in a water bottle, and let the bottle sit in a cold river overnight. I bet that would be great.

For that matter you could do the same thing with the roasted barley tea. It's commonly served iced during hot Japanese summers, and is very refreshing.
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  #12  
Old 06-09-2011, 02:34 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miltoncross
Reality, if you wanted iced green tea, you could just brew a few cups, put it in a water bottle, and let the bottle sit in a cold river overnight. I bet that would be great.
Putting beverages in the river/stream to cool certainly works. It's something I've done periodically since I was a child.

Unfortunately, I want iced tea on demand during the heat of the day.

It's not a problem for the first day, I've had ice logs in a hydration bladder in the pack sleeve along with first day's food before, it would work with tea too.

But I could use the "river" method while camping near alpine lakes - on more stationary trips. [The solar-powered ice machine is too heavy.]

Thanks.

Reality
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  #13  
Old 06-09-2011, 03:20 PM
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Ralph Ralph is offline
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I don't use a cooler that often but I have one I got from Moor & Mountain years ago. It's sewn from the linen canvas used in water bags, the kind that ooze water and cool by evaporation. The inner lining is folded Ensolite with gaps in the corners. Load with ice with the stuff to be cooled on top. As the ice melts the water seeps out, evaporates and cools the interior. I've had ice remnants up to 4 days of Adirondack summer. Also, you never open up the cooler to find your food awash in melt water.

A rectangular pocket made in this way and hung on the outside of the pack might work to keep your tea cool is not outright cold for a couple of days.
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  #14  
Old 06-10-2011, 02:05 PM
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miltoncross miltoncross is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality
Putting beverages in the river/stream to cool certainly works. It's something I've done periodically since I was a child.

By the way, I didn't mean to imply that you (or anyone) hadn't thought of the river method. I know it's as old as the hills, I was just talkin'.

I've been known to bring a Stanley thermos on day hikes - the joy of ice cold tea in the heat of the day is not to be underestimated.

I wonder if anyone has tried one of those thermal water bottle cozy/carriers, the ones that would fit a Nalgene bottle? That, in combination with the river cooling method, might get one closer to on-demand-iced-tea. I'm not an ounce counter, but I'd think the unmitigated pleasure of iced tea with lunch might be worth the extra weight of the carrier.
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  #15  
Old 06-28-2011, 06:43 PM
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JoelHikingDude JoelHikingDude is offline
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My old Asian Ex-Gf got me hooked on 2 different Teas:

California dieter's Drink: you dont know how constipated you have been all your life until you drink 1 or (if you dare) 2 bags of this. you can loose 7 pounds in the toilet if you are "stuck"

Chai Tea: Chai actually means "tea" in Hindi. I Believe is Masalian Tea. You can get it in Hot or cold. But I bought a Box for 3$, comes with 20 bags, and I just get the water to simmer, then dip the bag, wait only 3 or 4 mins, add a bit of soy milk ( in the trail i add creamer) but not necessary. about 2 Tbsp of sugar. the smell will clear you nostrils, and the "spices" in it leave a powerful taste of cinnamon and others in your tongue and throat. almost like Altoids. But its very sweet and flavor full.

I will take some bags of Chai, and maybe 1 or 2 of The California's just in case the trail gets me stuck.
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  #16  
Old 07-06-2011, 07:11 PM
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yippikiyo yippikiyo is offline
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I enjoy a cup of green tea with dinner and peppermint tea before bed. I usually take regular tea in bags and use the string as dental floss.

in my part of Texas, sassafras grows abundantly. i have been known to pull up a little plant for the roots and brew up some sassafras tea. it is an utter delight! just chop and mash the roots in some very hot (not boiling) water and brew to desired strength. you can save the leaves for your file gumbo.

yippikiyo
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  #17  
Old 07-12-2011, 02:48 AM
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nzbazza nzbazza is offline
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No fancy teas here, just regular green tea in bags. Boil some water up in a billy, drop in the tea bag(s) and let it brew for a while. Always have a brew in the morning and in the evening and sometimes one at lunchtime if it is a cold day.
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  #18  
Old 07-21-2011, 12:39 PM
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Laurie Laurie is offline
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I, almost always, use loose tea on the trail. Sometimes I use a reusable tea strainer but often I use unbleached tSac's for brewing my tea. What kind I drink depends on my mood but you can always find Earl Grey and Masala Chai in my pack.
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  #19  
Old 09-15-2011, 08:51 AM
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vdeal vdeal is offline
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I'm a confirmed tea drinker - have been since childhood. Now I do like a good coffee like Jamaican Blue Mountain but that doesn't come in a bag. For the most part I use Red Rose tea bags and supplement that with Celestial Seasonings Morning Thunder which is a mix of black tea and mate - a nice pick-me-up in the morning. I see that Laurie responded with the mention of T-Sacs. I have some and the clip but it seems a bit of a pain to use. I believe she mentioned filling them and then ironing them closed with a clothes iron. Am I correct Laurie?

As for Lapsang Souchong it is available in bags from Twinings.

Russian Caravan is available from Choice Organics Teas in bags.

Personally, I like the loose-leaf teas from Rishi Tea. Their African Rooibos and Oolongs are great. If the T-Sac trick works they will go with me.
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  #20  
Old 09-18-2011, 10:33 AM
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Haclil Haclil is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoelHikingDude
Chai Tea: Chai actually means "tea" in Hindi. I Believe is Masalian Tea. You can get it in Hot or cold. But I bought a Box for 3$, comes with 20 bags, and I just get the water to simmer, then dip the bag, wait only 3 or 4 mins...

A hot cup of chai masala on a cold morning really warms the cockles. Chai masala teabags are good but there's no substitute for chai made from scratch.

Here's how it's done in north-west India: Start with a container resembling a sauce pan, one that'll hold 1 to 4 cups depending on the size of your party.

Have these ingredients on hand: loose tea, cinnamon or shelled cardamom, milk or non-dairy milk, and sugar or sweetener. As the water approaches boil, put in the tea leaves, then the milk, then the sweetener. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for a bit. Set pan aside until the ingredients settle and pour. BTW the cinnamon or cardamom are the "masala".

Two well-suited Indian teas are the Darjeeling and Assam varieties.
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