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Gear List The Gear List forum is the place to post your actual backpacking gear list, and to read what others have in their packs. Don't forget to specify weight.


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  #11  
Old 04-21-2011, 11:00 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grannyhiker
My pack will support up to 35 lbs., but whether my knees and feet would hold up is another issue!

If I couldn't resupply after 12-14 days, though, I'd be in trouble!

perhaps a travois? sure it's a lot of work to haul it behind you but it lets you bear loads far greater than you could carry on your back. they were big among the nomadic people back when.
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  #12  
Old 04-22-2011, 12:39 PM
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Grannyhiker Grannyhiker is offline
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Backpack: SMD Comet
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Travois? Good thought! I have tried rigging one up in the back yard (with trekking poles and jacket) for possible use in case my dog gets sick or injured. The problem with that was making the dog stay on the travois long enough to test it!

Perhaps better, something using a bicycle wheel. Even a wheeled garbage can for back yard storage of emergency goods (chances are excellent that a severe earthquake, most likely catastrophe around the Portland, OR area, will result in fire) would be helpful, although probably not suitable for trails.
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  #13  
Old 04-22-2011, 09:38 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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something with wheels will give you mixed results. on firm and reasonably smooth it's even better than skids. trouble is, how often do you run into it?

it's a pity wheels aren't lightweight... though with a travois you could probably get away with lugging one around.
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  #14  
Old 04-23-2011, 08:03 AM
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richwads richwads is offline
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I recall seeing a hunter hauling a deer out on something with only 1 wheel - like a backwards wheelbarrow - it had a bicycle wheel and a platform. It was some time ago, but I think he had strapped to his waist and held onto the handles to help keep it upright. Like a travois, but with a wheel where the poles would drag.
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  #15  
Old 04-23-2011, 10:20 AM
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Kirt Kirt is offline
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Backpack: High Sierra Long Trail 90
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Join Date: Apr 2011
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I'd take my tent, my -30f synthetic sleeping bag (only one I have and need), my fixed blade knife with my pocket knife, 100' of green crafting wire, 100' of 550 cord and one of my Columbia winter jackets (the one with full fleece arms).

Reasons are:

1 - Tent and bag for temporary shelter until a more permanent one can be completed. Then used when conditions require them to be used again.
2 - Fixed blade for wood cutting\belaying, weapon, etc with the pocket knife used for less intensive use.
3 - Crafting wire and 550 cord used for snares and many other uses.
4 - Winter jacket for 4 season warmth (removable inner liner)

There are black bear where I live also, but I still wouldn't take a firearm. Wet black powder does nothing, running out of ammunition does nothing and the added weight with the growing rust (depending on location) would be too much.

That would be the gear I would take. For me it's not hypothetical, but has been proven as I've tested it since I was young (minus the tent, bag and jacket of course) for week long excursions as I was growing up.

No, I'm not a "hippie" but I taught myself to be able to survive on bare essentials should something happen. It was also for self-gratification of being able to make something out of nothing.
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  #16  
Old 04-23-2011, 07:01 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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main reason i'd go with a bow: it's all but impossible to render it useless.

you can make strings from just about anything with fibers.

arrows are easy to craft if you know what to look for in materials.

arrowheads, well, it's a good excuse to learn knapping.


though you'd be surprised what blackpowder can go through and still be usable. even if you wet it, that's by no means the end. wet it some more, spread it out on something flat, set it in the sun for a bit, then powder it between two rocks, or, if you're really handy, make a mortar and pestle out of wood.

biggest argument against firearms that i can come up with is the relative difficulty of keeping a good supply of the stuff that comes out of the barrel.

blackpowder type fire-arms have more in favor here, as you can recover spent rounds and recycle them fairly easily. then the real limiting factor is your powder supply, which can be worked around. while the sulfur must be procured, you can make your own charcoal and nitrates. while the powder isn't as strong as if you had sulfur, it'll do. granted, keeping a flintlock running strong in wet weather is a challenge, but there are tricks.

i've been coming back to this thought train for a while now, and i think the travois was the final piece of the puzzle for me.

so, if i made a travois, my long(more like extreme) haul expedition kit would look more like:

Pack: likely my mountainsmith over the CFP-90. being able to load an external hauler in addition to my pack would allow me to go with the smaller, more nimble pack for forays from camp regardless of weather or purpose, yet still haul enough around that i'd be covered for almost anything.

Tools:
my nice full-size single bit axe. sure the fiberglass handle makes it heavy, but it's powerful and would last an eternity. a spare axe head in the eventuality the other one breaks. Saw would likely be a bush(bow) type with spare blades, and maybe one of those 'chainsaw in a pocket' type saws so i could improvise while away from camp. a drawknife(more suitable to many tasks than a regular knife), and two chisels, one narrow, one wide.
hammer-type implements could be made as needed(mattock type items).
a set of whetstones of decent bulk, likely waterstones over oilstones for various reasons.

camp:
shelter would likely be a yurt or a lavvu. both are very weather-resilient shelters that can be put up/taken down in a reasonable time frame but are solid enough to hold up over long periods. The lavvu would be easier to repair in the field as the structure is a lot less intricate than the yurt. this does come at the price of less interior volume.

sleeping would most likely consist of my alps synthetic bag, and in all probability one of the blue ccf pads(simpler is harder to break). a wool blanket will likely go along for summertime usage.

cooking:
now here's the tough section. i've become *really* attatched to my raptor stove. however, even the larger cans don't last forever. alcohol is nice, but unless i wanted to go to a LOT of trouble, i wouldn't be able to use one of those for very long.

so the best available very-long term option is wood, looks like. there are a lot of pretty efficient designs out there, so likely i'd go with one of the models featuring pre-heat and a fairly open(simple) design, that can run fairly well on squaw-wood. depending on the size of the stove and the scale of the shelter, i might even be able to get away with having it inside with me for winter-time.
the usual culprits would go with me to cook things in: steel pots, the bailed pot i have as well as the handleless wonder, and a smaller cast iron pan for anything that couldn't cook in those.

other items/tools/useful things:

hawken-type flintlock. it's simple, reliable, and a little lighter than the kentucky-model that was popular shortly before the hawken pattern appeared. it also comes in bigger calibers(traditionally up past .60 but nowadays they top out at .54-.58) for more oomph downrange. with it would come a couple pounds of powder and about 200 bullets, plus a mold and smelting spoon. bullet design is pretty involved and won't be covered here, but i will say that i'd take one of the minie type bullets because of the greater sectional density.

Bow: debatable what type. my only requirements would be wood, natural material string, of about 80-100lbs draw, and sized to my draw length. this would be for the eventuality that the gun would either finally run out of ability to fire, or break beyond my ability to repair it.

knives/edged stuff: my previously mentioned set, as well as my camillus pocketknife and a proper light 'hawk. maybe even a fillet knife.

several hundred feet of light, strong cordage as well as about a pound of 20-gauge steel wire. that's a LOT of wire, btw.

clothing:
extra beyond what i normally take, selected for long-wearing and comfort over weight. assuming a VERY extended trip, several items would likely get replaced with field-made clothes, likely leather. a fully-stocked sewing kit including a palm, awl, and enough good synth thread for a long time would be counted under clothes.

food:
the essential concern. highest priority goes to stuff that might be hard to come by in the field, including certain vitamins and fats. initial loadout would focus heavily on long-storage dry goods, including rices, grains, beans, you get the idea. as meat would be foraged much of the time, any that goes along is only for the inital phase of the trip, or emergency purposes.

following that thought: a week's worth of emergency rations. they keep for years, require no heat to make ready, and would make good last-ditch supplies.

water treatment would need to be VERY long-usage. boiling would likely be what i'd choose, as i don't think i could trust a filtration unit to keep going for months in the field. it's not ideal, but unless i could find a clean spring to use, what choice do i have?

most of the above would concern an extremely long-term trip, what i think of with the phrase 'expedition'. the above could easily keep me going for a year or more without any real need to return to civilization for new stuff.

addendum for EOTW(end of the world) type scenario: seeds. a couple pounds of a variety of easy to grow seed stock. sure i'd be stuck where i was for a year, but if i sited myself well, that's not a problem.
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  #17  
Old 04-24-2011, 01:15 PM
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SSDD SSDD is offline
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Man your going to need a team of donkeys to pack all that for you

Sure a lot of that would be nice however how likely are you to move very far in any amount of time humping 350+ lbs of gear and supplies without pack animals and out in Alaska

Also some wire snares would be of great value in any area and can be used over and over for food clothing and to make things you could trade should you need something you ran out of or don't have..
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  #18  
Old 04-24-2011, 02:17 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SSDD
Man your going to need a team of donkeys to pack all that for you

Sure a lot of that would be nice however how likely are you to move very far in any amount of time humping 350+ lbs of gear and supplies without pack animals and out in Alaska



travois. the real issue isn't weight(the tool/material loadout comes out to about 100-125 pounds. i could carry that on my back, but it's not easy. a lot of it is really bulky too, which is where the travois would come in. heck, in snow it'd be even better.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SSDD

Also some wire snares would be of great value in any area and can be used over and over for food clothing and to make things you could trade should you need something you ran out of or don't have..
oh, definitely. the downside there is the critters that are best for clothing are kind of big. yes, you can take them with a snare, but it's difficult at best. there's a high risk of them breaking the snare or ripping it loose, and then you've got a lamed animal.

but for taking small game, there's no more efficient way than well-sited snares.

medical supplies would be a huge concern for me, i admit. if i were going to be away from assistance for a long time, i'd want a pretty well-stocked kit, all the essentials plus splints, plenty of bandages, sutures, and a good stock of both painkillers and anti-biotics.
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  #19  
Old 04-24-2011, 05:12 PM
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SSDD SSDD is offline
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In the snow a pulk sled would work OK to good even better on ice

Snares will get you Med-big game the hard part to deal with is the antlers, but if you use 1/4" to 5/32" aircraft cable either 7x19 (weaker but more flexable) or 1x7 (stronger but not as flexable) cable to get cougar, wolf, black bear, hogs, crocodile, grizzly & Kodiak bears.

I like to use the k.i.s.s. principle as it helps weed out things unneeded.

Look at a axe I can do about the same stuff with a tomahawk it may take longer but it is a lot smaller and lighter and can be used as a defencive tool. Now in extreme cold weather IIRC at -60 deg even a maul will break like glass if hit hard so a saw is better in that type of weather.

Also if you keep your gear some what light if you need to move fast you can say to keep up with migrating animals, fire, unwanted humans in your area and so on.

As much as making a cabin and doing the Grizzly Adams thing would be nice but the situation may not allow that so being able to move may be more advantageous.
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  #20  
Old 04-24-2011, 10:39 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
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Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SSDD
In the snow a pulk sled would work OK to good even better on ice


aye, aye. maybe a travois that could be converted to a sled? wouldn't be all that difficult, just steam and shape the ends of the poles and have extra canvas.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SSDD
Snares will get you Med-big game the hard part to deal with is the antlers, but if you use 1/4" to 5/32" aircraft cable either 7x19 (weaker but more flexable) or 1x7 (stronger but not as flexable) cable to get cougar, wolf, black bear, hogs, crocodile, grizzly & Kodiak bears.
true, though where am i gonna get the concrete for anchoring them? i keed, i keed. a tree would do, though if i were going after anything bigger than a fox i would rather do it with a bow or a gun. it's worth the ammunition at that point.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SSDD

Look at a axe I can do about the same stuff with a tomahawk it may take longer but it is a lot smaller and lighter and can be used as a defencive tool. Now in extreme cold weather IIRC at -60 deg even a maul will break like glass if hit hard so a saw is better in that type of weather.
i like wood mauls over metal. easy to replace in the field, you don't have to lug around an 8-10 pound single-purpose tool. they also don't break in cold weather all that easy, having more give than a metal head.

to be honest, my own selection is a lot less about settling down, though it's entirely an option with that sort of gear should i so choose.

on axe vs 'hawk. it's a matter of effiency and power. the axe may take more energy per swing, but it does a LOT more work per swing than a 'hawk. if i were setting up camp for a week, i'd rather spend one or two days working on having enough firewood for proper cookfires by using the axe to fell a good sized tree or two, break it down and split it out, than use a hawk every day, after hunting down smaller trees and having to take more of them.

that said, i'd totally take a tomahawk in addition to a good axe. if i were on a forage jaunt from camp and were forced to overnight for one reason or another away from camp, it would come in VERY useful at that point.

dunno about using it defensively against anything other than a similarly armed person. just about any animal that would pose a significant threat to me that were attacking would likely overpower and severely injure me unless i scored a perfect killing blow on the first swing. which would be a little hard under the circumstances.
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