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Wilderness Photography The Wilderness Photography forum is for the discussion of photography (videography) gear, experience, and technique as it directly relates to wilderness photography. PBF members may also post self-owned photos that have been uploaded to the PB Gallery or as post attachments. Offsite links and offsite photos are prohibited. Please see ("sticky") instructional post located at top of threads.


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  #11  
Old 05-25-2011, 01:49 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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The photos are wonderful - especially considering you didn't use a tripod (and perhaps remote).

Were you using a kit lens?

By the way, everytime I see photos of the RR area, it brings on a strong desire to go back again. I, too, like to go before (or after) the bugs and bears are biting.

Reality
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  #12  
Old 05-25-2011, 08:23 PM
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adventure_dog adventure_dog is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality
The photos are wonderful - especially considering you didn't use a tripod (and perhaps remote).

Were you using a kit lens?
Thanks, Reality! I didn't use a remote or tripod; I simply took a deep breath and fired off three successive shots in bracket mode.

I was using a Nikkor 18mm - 200mm DX lens that I purchased because I like the wide range it provides. I like the wide angle and the telephoto aspect is great for macros of flowers and bugs. It's a lot of glass so it's heavy and I'm trying to determine if it's worth it on some trips. I've lightened my load significantly over the last couple of years, only to gain a lot of it back in one heavy camera.
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  #13  
Old 05-26-2011, 11:47 PM
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GGervin GGervin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adventure_dog
I was using a Nikkor 18mm - 200mm DX lens... It's a lot of glass so it's heavy and I'm trying to determine if it's worth it on some trips. I've lightened my load significantly over the last couple of years, only to gain a lot of it back in one heavy camera.

And that's sooo easy to happen when it comes to good photo gear. I was never tempted by ultra-light packing gear until I got serious about carrying a camera. Now it seems essential if I'm going to carry the camera I want to. The weight of the photo gear becomes a burden of love, I guess...

Is this the 18-200 DX VR or VRII at f3.5-f5.6? If so, it weighs about 1.25lb.? That's actually very lightweight for the lens' capability and quality. It seems to be highly thought of for lightweight travel photography. I bet if you change lenses, you will have to give up capability or quality for only a few oz weight saved and for a huge drain on the pocket book. I'd encourage you to hang in there and keep carrying it, and count the bit of extra weight a labor of love. I think your results easily justify the burden. (They do say an artist must suffer for their art, right?)

By the way, I think the exposure and range of contrast is great in all your latest photos. None show blown out highlights and all show detail into the deepest shadows. It seems clear to me that for the contrast range of these particular scenes you did well to bracket by 2 stops and that you are figuring this HDR business out. Keep up the great work.

For those who still aren't sure what HDR is all about, have you considered posting the 3 bracketed frames you used for your HDR processing (maybe for the first Rogue River photo), and then re-posting the end result? It might demonstrate why someone should care to learn about this technique.
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  #14  
Old 05-31-2011, 05:16 PM
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adventure_dog adventure_dog is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GGervin
Is this the 18-200 DX VR or VRII at f3.5-f5.6? If so, it weighs about 1.25lb.?
Specifically, it's the AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR II. It's a very versatile lens for landscapes and outdoor shooting and I like it, despite it's weight.

Quote:
I think your results easily justify the burden. (They do say an artist must suffer for their art, right?)
The entire setup weighs 3 lbs, 2.05 oz, including the lens and camera body, body snuggie, hood, and polarizing filter. The body snuggie is a rubberized suit that keeps the body and buttons clean-ish and less prone to damage.

You're right about suffering. The carry is the hardest part. Over the three-day trip, I just kept it slung over my shoulder for the most part. I tried walking with it, Baby Bjorn-style, between my chest strap and my chest, but that left some bruises. The problem is that every time I put it away, something I wanted to photograph would come into view. And - as you know - those photo moments can be so elusive, especially with wildlife and dramatic lighting.

Quote:
For those who still aren't sure what HDR is all about, have you considered posting the 3 bracketed frames you used for your HDR processing (maybe for the first Rogue River photo), and then re-posting the end result? It might demonstrate why someone should care to learn about this technique.
Great idea - I will do that!
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  #15  
Old 06-01-2011, 12:42 AM
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GGervin GGervin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adventure_dog
...as you know - those photo moments can be so elusive, especially with wildlife and dramatic lighting.

I dread to think the miles I've walked to re-take a photo for some minor improvement, and I believe I've never been successful in getting a re-take to come out. Something's always changed that ruins it. By all means, continue to seize the moment. Cartier-Bresson coined the term, "decisive moment," and in backcountry photography wildlife opps and/or lighting definitely defines it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by adventure_dog
The entire setup weighs 3 lbs, 2.05 oz

By the way, my 35mm wildlife rig (with 300mm f2.8 Tamron, camera body, and shoulder stock) weighs about 11lbs. My view camera rig with 3 lenses, tripod and support arm weighs about 17lbs. In the midst of travail, you should celebrate the achievement of 3 lbs, 2.05 oz. Foreign as that idea may seem. A backpacker's concept of "ultralight" and a photo gear manufacturer's concept of "ultralight" simply don't mesh. But I expect you've already discovered that...

Last edited by GGervin : 06-01-2011 at 12:56 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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  #16  
Old 09-18-2012, 10:05 AM
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DieselTwitch DieselTwitch is offline
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Backpack: Osprey Aether 60
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Join Date: Sep 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GGervin
By the way, my 35mm wildlife rig (with 300mm f2.8 Tamron, camera body, and shoulder stock) weighs about 11lbs. My view camera rig with 3 lenses, tripod and support arm weighs about 17lbs. In the midst of travail, you should celebrate the achievement of 3 lbs, 2.05 oz. Foreign as that idea may seem. A backpacker's concept of "ultralight" and a photo gear manufacturer's concept of "ultralight" simply don't mesh. But I expect you've already discovered that...

I also love HDRing (is that even a word? it is now! ) But like you I didn't want to carry a huge multi pound setup with lenses an tripods.... bla bla, not to mention the cost of all that gear plus the risk of damaging it and having to deal with it.

My solution was to use a regular Point & Shoot and hack it for bracketing.... up to 10 shots at a time! granted they are not high speed back to back shot so ghosting can be a problem but some of the software i use helps with it a lot! the hack is called CHDK (Cannon Hack Development Kit) and allows you todo all sorts of awesome things like motion triggering, easily change shutter time to any thing you like for those long night exposures even shoot in RAW all from a P&S... man I sound like im trying to sell these things. but the cool thing is that my entire camera setup (Camera, Case, 3 batts, 2 SD Cards.. enough for 7 days) weighs in at only 8.3 oz!

Here are some of my shots with this setup... granded they are not the best but you get the idea.
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  #17  
Old 09-18-2012, 11:03 AM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Thanks for sharing, DieselTwitch. My particular favorite is the shot with the tents.

By the way, is that someone kneeling down in the shot?

Reality
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  #18  
Old 09-18-2012, 11:37 AM
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DieselTwitch DieselTwitch is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality
Thanks for sharing, DieselTwitch. My particular favorite is the shot with the tents.

By the way, is that someone kneeling down in the shot?

Reality

he's bending down loading his pack
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