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Fishing & Hunting The Fishing & Hunting forum is for discussion (on-site content) that directly relates to wilderness fishing and hunting with an emphasis on engaging in these activities while on backpacking trips. Lightweight/packable gear, personal experience/technique, and trip reports are of central focus. [Reminder: PBF is for actual content, not links/reference to offsite content.]


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  #1  
Old 08-16-2010, 09:18 AM
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microzen microzen is offline
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Fishing Pole Recommendations for Beginners

Can you recommend a pole? (I am a fishing newbie)
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Old 08-16-2010, 10:47 AM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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you're going to want something about six foot long when it's put together(this varies depending on where you're fishing and what for). lighter action is more sensitive, so light to medium action(again, depending on what you want to fish for. a light action rod will be marginal with salmon, say).

casting reels are tricky to use if you've never done it before. spinners are easy to use but can get tangled. this is easy to fix however, in a spinner reel. spincaster reels are the best of both worlds in a lot of ways, and have all their own drawbacks.

in part it's going to depend on where and what for that you're doing your fishing.

starter kits from your local purveyor of goods for sports activities is probably a safe start. 20-25$ and you've got pretty much everything you need. they also come in kits that are tailored to specific kinds of fishing, like trout/bass, or fly fishing.

i myself am a generalist, so i carry a spinner rod/reel(different reel types go on different rod types because of how they work. keep that in mind), an assortment of tackle ranging from lures to bait, both for cast-retrieve and drift fishing. it's a setup that will let me work in lakes, streams, from shore or boat.

that said, it's under-equipped for specific situations.
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Old 08-16-2010, 02:29 PM
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microzen microzen is offline
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Thank you.

It is for one of my kids that always want to fish. I just don't want to get stuck with more weight. It looks like there are a variety of inexpensive options and low weight.
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Old 08-16-2010, 04:41 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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In short, I'd opt for whatever fishing pole that you like and are comfortable using. Compact and lightweight are pluses.

There are other variables that are dependent upon such things as what type of "water" you'll be accessing (lake, stream, ocean,...) and the type of fish you'd like to catch. Fishing implements can range from just a line to a stick to a fancy fly rod, etc.

The more that you provide about your interests and intentions the more it will help others to narrow it down for you.

Reality
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Old 08-16-2010, 08:21 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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it's also worthwhile to maybe pick up a magazine on fishing, or a book on fishing in general(i'm sure there's one on backpacking and fishing), and that can be really illuminating for the both of you. talking to the guys in the shops can be suprisingly helpful, but it depends on the shop.
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Old 08-17-2010, 10:17 AM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Great advice, dsuursoo. The good thing about talking to the "guys" in the shop is that they can offer advice for the local fishing area.

IMO, it's rare (depending upon location) to run into those who are geared up for backpacking and fishing. So you may have to scale down accordingly.

Reality
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Old 08-17-2010, 07:21 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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not only can the guys in the stores(especially fishing specific shops) know a lot about local fishing, they'll usually have a pretty good bit of fishing under their belts, sometimes, depending on the shop, as much as a century of combined experience.

if there's a cabela's nearby it's hard to go wrong by going to them. they'll also have a pretty dazzling assortment of fishing stuff, enough that even the folks who have done it for a while are overwhelmed.

if you go talk to the guys, they'll probably steer you away from beginner's kits(and probably away from character loaded kid's rods), those are there for the folks in a hurry who don't want to talk. odds are they'll steer you towards simple, easy to use, and reliable. but take everything with a grain of salt, some will just try to sell you a bunch of stuff.


seems like the best shops are the ones full of retired fellas just getting out of the house and getting a couple bucks while they're at it. sure the stories are tall... there's a lot of wisdom too. take a coffee and give yourself at least an hour.


on a side note, a former co-worker of mine used to carry around a little teeny rod about a foot long for fishing if he just felt like it. he even landed some salmon with it, though it was a hairy thing. they weigh about a pound after the reel goes on. might be worth for backpacking.

outside that advice and what was mentioned before, if you find south bend rod/reel combos, they're not terrible. pretty sturdy, nice action, affordable. i've been using them for a couple of years, and for casual fishing they're perfect. landed a 14/15 inch trout one trip to the coast that was one of the most delicious fish i ever caught.
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Old 02-06-2012, 10:09 PM
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Ralph Ralph is offline
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The simplest fishing rig is the pole. That is, the 2 or 3-piece bamboo poles, a length of line, 8-10' long, a few hooks, some sinkers and a bobber, with worms or bugs as bait. Cabela's sells a neat little carbon-fiber telescopic panfish pole that is about as light and compact as it gets.

Another very compact and light rig is the "pen" rod with a miniature reel from GoFastand Light. This is a carbon-fiber telescopic rod packaged in a pen-type case that also forms the handle. Reels available are a fly reel, a casting reel and a spinning reel. You will probably want a larger, more conventional rod if you do a lot of fishing, but the tiny pen rod is great kit to have just in case the opportunity for some fishing arises.
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Old 02-07-2012, 07:11 PM
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Hanr3 Hanr3 is offline
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Since your child is starting out and Im assuming your fishing fresh water inland lakes for pan fish or small trout. Go with a Zebco 33 reel and a Ugly Stick rod. Learn to slip bobber fish and you can carry waxworms for bait (bluegill, sunfish).

IF you can find an old Zebco even better, the newer versions have plastic gears and dont last under heavy fish with high drag. The older versions had metal gears and are practically indistructable.

The Ugly Stick is also practically indestructable, especially the tip, which is what every kid breaks off in the car door. You dont need a long rod, however generally the longer the better for casting further out. However you have to consider how short the sections are when you break it down for packing.

I highly recommend practicing at your local lake to learn what gear you will need and dont need. Pan fish have the same habits in similar lakes across the US. The number one goal with kids is to catch anything. Its a bonus if they can actually eat it.

You dont need anything special to cook em up. Could be a simple as a fillet knife and a stick. Cut the fillets off both sides, leaving the skin and scales on the meat, thread the stick through a couple of times and put it over a campfire on a slow cook setting. When she turns flacky and white, ready to serve. Skin side down in your pan, and fork the meat off the skin. YOu dont eat the skin. Flavoring can be as simple as butter and lemon.

Couldn't tell you how many times I've taught kids how to eat fish. Been taking the Scouts out at least once a year for the past 20something years. Every year its the same with some kids, I aint eating that, one bite later and its can I have some more...
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  #10  
Old 02-11-2012, 05:29 PM
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atraildreamer atraildreamer is offline
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Thumbs up Great little rigs!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph
Another very compact and light rig is the "pen" rod with a miniature reel from GoFastand Light. This is a carbon-fiber telescopic rod packaged in a pen-type case that also forms the handle.

I bought one of each of these rigs at a local closeout store for $3 each! The better half immediately claimed the spincast set and I got the open face reel. I made up a couple of nylon bags to carry the rigs. Both sets came with a small assortment of hooks, sinkers and floats.

Years ago, I bought a telescoping fishing rod for about $9 that was about 12" closed and expanded to 6 1/2 feet in length. I used a Daiwa closed-faced spin casting reel. The rod had good strength and flexibility and fit easily into my daypack for my frequent fishing forays. I haven't seen this type of rod for sale lately, and unfortunately, it was stolen, along with a lot of my other outdoor gear by a scumbag neighbor.
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