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Gear List The Gear List forum is the place to post your actual backpacking gear list, and to read what others have in their packs. Don't forget to specify weight.


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  #1  
Old 04-13-2010, 10:11 AM
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austin austin is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
Backpack: ULA Catalyst
Sleeping Gear: Montbell 15 degree spiral down bag
Shelter: Henry Shires tarptent Double Rainbow
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Tampa, Florida
Posts: 23
First Backpacking Trip Gear List

Hi there! thanks for taking time to look through my list. I am currently planning my first backpacking trip, besides when I went with a self development organization called Outward Bound in Colorado. I am planning to do 7-8 days in Colorado, or the John Muir trail late July/early august. Some of the items like the double rainbow and gsi dualist are to be shared with my g/f. Any constructive criticism will be appreciated. thanks


Big Four
Thermarest Prolite 4 (15.5 oz)
Mont-bell u.l. spiral hugger 1 (32 oz)
TT double rainbow (43 oz)
ULA Catalyst (48 oz)
Big Four total: 8.6 lbs.

Cooking
snowpeak litemax stove (2 oz)
Gsi Pinnacle Dualist (pot, 2 bowls and mugs, 2 sporks, wash basin) (21 oz)
Snowpeak pro Iso fuel (7 oz)
bic mini lighters 2 (0.7 oz)

Clothing/Boots/Misc.
therma max thermal underwear (15 oz)
Synthetic t-shirt (4oz)
Synthetic boxer briefs (3 oz)
Columbia Rainpants and Jacket (24 oz)
Princeton Tec Aurora headlamp (2.8 oz)
Smart Wool socks x 2 pairs (6 oz)
liner socks ( 1 oz)
Montrail hiking boots (60 oz)
flip flop camp shoes (5 oz)
bandana (1 oz)
baseball cap (2 oz)
Columbia fleece sweater (16 oz)
Wool Beanie (2 oz)
North Face zip off pants (18 oz)
Pack cover, food bag stuff sack, and sleeping bag stuff sack (7oz)


Hydration
2 liter water bottle/platypus (2 oz)
Purification Tablets (2 oz)

Navigation
map (1 oz)
Suunto M2D Locator compass (1 oz)

hygene
small tube of toothpaste and toothbrush (1.5 oz)
toilet paper (2 oz)
campsuds (2 oz)

total: 347.5 oz or 21 lbs 11.1 oz

Thanks for all your help!

Whoops, I forgot to add the Med Kit and trekking poles. I will probably carry a basic med kit with moleskin, asprin, and bandages. I am also still debating on which trekking poles to get..possibly the leki summit anti-shock or trail which will add about 20 oz to the packweight for the trekking poles, and I'm not sure about the med kit weight.

Last edited by austin : 04-13-2010 at 02:03 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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  #2  
Old 04-13-2010, 03:28 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
add some immodium to the medkit. you never know when you might goof up in your food prep, or with your water purification. being able to actually make it down the trail after you come down with traveler's sickness is good and smart.

there's no seperate 'oh crap' survival kit. in the wilds of colorado for a week, it's only smart to pack a small emergency kit that has a couple space blankets, some chemical water purification, a collapsible container, and a few other essentials. take it with you any time you walk away from your pack, day or night. it beats shivering in the woods because you got turned around after going to the bathroom. pack one for each of you. keep it on top of your pack.

those boots are pretty heavy.
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  #3  
Old 04-14-2010, 09:47 AM
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austin austin is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
Backpack: ULA Catalyst
Sleeping Gear: Montbell 15 degree spiral down bag
Shelter: Henry Shires tarptent Double Rainbow
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Tampa, Florida
Posts: 23
Thanks for the reply dsuursoo. Have you ever been in a situation where you needed the items in your survival kit? Also, are there any items in your med kit that you consistently use more than others? I know the boots are a alittle heavy, but they still have alot of use left in them and I cannot justify spending the extra money on new ones until these get worn out.

-Austin
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  #4  
Old 04-14-2010, 09:51 AM
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Mountaineerbass Mountaineerbass is offline
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Backpack: Osprey Aether
Sleeping Gear: Big Agnes Lost Ranger
Shelter: REI Quarter Dome
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Virginia
Posts: 250
Take plenty of anti-septic for cuts and nicks. Plus, are you only taking one platypus? I would take at least two, in case of failure.
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  #5  
Old 04-14-2010, 12:13 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
Quote:
Originally Posted by austin
Thanks for the reply dsuursoo. Have you ever been in a situation where you needed the items in your survival kit? Also, are there any items in your med kit that you consistently use more than others? I know the boots are a alittle heavy, but they still have alot of use left in them and I cannot justify spending the extra money on new ones until these get worn out.

-Austin

yes, actually, more than once while turned around in the dark away from base camp and while on hunting roves. once when the trail collapsed with me on it and i went on a merry ride down into the bottom of the ravine. my pack died. i didn't. i wound up using my emergency kit to hike overland back to civilization, having climbed up the wrong side of the ravine(i had just fallen 40-odd feet. i had a right to be a touch loopy). i spent just shy of four days post-fall hiking out(alaska is a surprisingly big place), all of it subsisted by the kit, foraging and trapping.

i'm hardly an idiot hiker. i might be one of the more aware and alert folks out there, and i'm a pretty good tracker, even at night. but things go wrong.

even if those situations had never come up, i would carry a survival kit every time i went into the woods.

it's one thing to get into trouble and have the worst outcome when it's completely out of your control. it's another thing when that happens and there is something simple to do to prevent it from ever happening.

the low-weight ethos of 'don't take what you don't use' is a dangerous one when it's taught with the caveat 'except for a survival kit, which you must always have'. because hikers will either A: never carry it, thinking 'oh, it's just dead weight' or B: they'll remove it after a few hikes, thinking 'oh, i never need it'.

and then they wind up being in the news. it's not 100%. it might never happen to you.

but i personally would rather your 'might never' be a 'will never', or as close to it as possible.

those tiny kits you see sold, they're crap. put together your own. a fellow who goes by the moniker 'M40' has a site dedicated to survival stuff. leave any sensitive points you might have at the door, he doesn't pull any punches and he's anything but politically correct. his info is top notch however.

you can make a survival kit that weighs less than a pound, but you'll likely be making a couple compromises along the way. mine is more full-featured than most, but i personally prepared my kit to support myself for at least three-five days provided i have access to water, without needing food. or, it'll support myself and someone else for 2-3 days only needing access to water.

i'm a belt and suspenders kind of guy.

asprin/tylenol get used more than anything else, to handle the ache of a hard hike if i haven't been out for a while. the immodium is just a few packets, as a just in case. antiseptic is useful. a couple butterfly sutures might be handy, weigh nothing or next to it. a few of each sort of bandage, and a wrap tape really round it out. anti-itch cream is smart if you expect to travel through a poison ivy/oak area. if you're not sure, it's optional but might be handy just in case. not a big tube, and you only need one. it's also useful for bug-bites.

i brought up the boots just in case you had a lighter option you hadn't considered. i'd probably shun any sort of serious in camp footwear then, if you're looking to reduce weight. aquasox are light and low-bulk though.
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  #6  
Old 04-14-2010, 12:46 PM
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adventure_dog adventure_dog is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 273
You'll be in bear country in both places. An approved bear canister will be required on the JMT; you'll at least need some cord and a caribeaner for bear bagging in Colorado.

Other things I'd add:
  • pocket knife
  • tenacious tape or duct tape for repairs
  • Thermarest repair kit
  • something to dig a cathole with
  • anti-inflamatories (i.e., Advil or Aleve)
  • another bandana or two
  • fire starter and matches
  • sunscreen
  • sunglasses
  • bug dope
  • 1-liter Platypus (so you can treat and drink at the same time)
  • polypro gloves
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  #7  
Old 04-15-2010, 03:53 PM
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yippikiyo yippikiyo is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 485
I can't comment on the JMT but in Colorado you will absolutely need the bug repellent and I would also consider a head net or a "scarf" of bug netting (this is what I use) to wrap around your hat. It's shocking how the skeeters come out at dusk in Colorado mtns, especially near water but even on many places along the CDT w/out obvious water sources nearby. Unless you like to breathe them lil bugs...

I like the Ursack instead of fussing with bear bags.

sunscreen? i didn't see it on your list but you'll want some.

i don't use moleskin, i prefer duct tape. have you experience with both?

ibuprofen and tylenol, one for body aches, one for headaches.

extra platy. they don't take up much space and they do fail on occasion. or 1 platy and 1 widemouth nalgene

second the knife suggestion. no wimpy Juice model, either. get a good knife

i usually bring 2 bandanas. they are great for potholders, neck gaiters, washclothes, tying extra clothes in for a pillow, sling, placemat, marker in deep woods for trail

yippikiyo
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  #8  
Old 04-16-2010, 08:53 AM
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aarondietzen aarondietzen is offline
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Backpack: GoLite Pinnacle
Sleeping Gear: Northface Cat's Meow with a Big Agnes AirCore Mummy (both Long)
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Colorado
Posts: 23
I have never done the John Muir trail, but I do hike in Colorado (as I live here) and I would say add more water carrying. When you consider how dry it is here, especially in the summer, and how far apart water sources can be, you might want to carry additional water. I generally carry a 2L hoser and a second 2L platy. I have been on the CDT and had to walk through most of the day without passing any water.
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  #9  
Old 04-16-2010, 08:12 PM
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niallgar niallgar is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Ontario
Posts: 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by aarondietzen
I have never done the John Muir trail, but I do hike in Colorado (as I live here) and I would say add more water carrying. When you consider how dry it is here, especially in the summer, and how far apart water sources can be, you might want to carry additional water. I generally carry a 2L hoser and a second 2L platy. I have been on the CDT and had to walk through most of the day without passing any water.

I hiked the JMT solo last summer and water availability is not a huge issue in most places. But it is always a good idea to carry an extra 2L platy - especially since they only weigh a scant 1.3 oz. Last summer I brought a 2.5L MSR Dromedary bag and two 2L Platypus bags. I also had a 500ml Gatorade bottle that I bought at Tuolumne Meadows that ended up going with me the whole trip. When I got to camp for the night I would ususally fill up both 2L platys. That was usually enough water for the evening / washing up etc., and I would have enough water for the next day's breakfast, and to get going down the trail.
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  #10  
Old 04-18-2010, 08:33 PM
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austin austin is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
Backpack: ULA Catalyst
Sleeping Gear: Montbell 15 degree spiral down bag
Shelter: Henry Shires tarptent Double Rainbow
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Tampa, Florida
Posts: 23
First, I would like to thank you all for your time and opinions. They have been very useful, and it feels good to have my post answered.

There was alot of comments about bringing extra water containers, so I will deffinitely do that. Has anyone found that it is easier to bring regular gatorade bottles than to deal with platys? and will 2 one liter bottles be sufficient? it also seems like it would be more difficult to get water into the smaller mouths of the bottles, has this been a problem?

"YippiKiyo-i don't use moleskin, i prefer duct tape. have you experience with both?"
I have used Moleskin when I felt a blister coming, and it has worked fine. I have never used it after a blister has already formed though. Could the duct tape suffice as the thermarest repair kit also?


Next, I hear everyone talking about fire starters and matches. Would bringing two small lighters and storing them in different places not be suffiient? why are matches or firestarters any better when they weigh nearly the same?

About the issue with the bear bags...We did not use bear bags with the organization (outward bound) in Colorado and did not have any problems; they said that there were not too many bears in the area we were hiking. Would it be completely inorant of me to think that a regular food bag will suffice?

Any suggestions on pocket knives that won't burn a hole in my pocket?

Lastly, If I will be flying into the denver airport, does anyone have suggestions on how to get from there into the mountains or near the colorado trail? Are there any hostels/hiking shops that could be used as a base camp to get everything together?

I know there were alot of questions, so I would like to thank you all in advanced for your responses

Last edited by austin : 04-18-2010 at 08:40 PM.
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