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Backpacker's Health & Safety The Backpacker's Health & Safety forum is for the discussion of health and safety/survival issues that directly relate to backpackers.


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  #11  
Old 02-16-2010, 08:23 PM
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SSDD SSDD is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FatherTime66
I'm not a year-round backpacker. My preference is to hit the trail when the weather is moderately comfortable, say above 45 degrees. Rain doesn't bother me but cold does. So for me, November thru May in Oregon is usually "off season".

Are there others out there who share my weenie approach to Mother Nature, and if so, what do you do to stay in shape? I walk several miles every other day, but that's getting a little old, and exercise machines don't excite much either.

I would love to have some new options.


Well if you don't like or your not geared up for below 45deg nights I would start doing day hikes or using a elliptical machine. Most of the year if you are up in the cascades you are at about 35-45deg at night. So why not just add a light-mid weight base layer and keep BP'ing all year just stay west of the cascades or close to the Columbia River and you should be ok.

I find the time I hike the least is moskeeto Hell season I love all the great places to hike out here in central Oregon
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  #12  
Old 02-21-2010, 02:21 PM
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armbruster armbruster is offline
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I've surprised myself by coming to look forward to the gym in the morning. Just an hour's workout a couple of days a week (o.k. longer on the weekends)really makes a difference. And honestly, it's a little addicting, in a good way.
But the thing that gets me through winter with a smile is nordic skiing, plus a little snowshoeing. It's very aerobic and really works the legs; but that's not why I do it. It's very fun. There's a kind of rythmic beauty to skating/striding through the snowy woods that's hard to describe. And I get to stay in a warm room with beer at night!
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  #13  
Old 02-21-2010, 03:09 PM
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Tipiwalter Tipiwalter is offline
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My policy has always been that your lifestyle should dictate your exercise. Example: You decide to live out in the woods in a cabin or a yurt or whatever, and you have no road to it so you have to walk in with everything on your back. To live and sleep you therefore have to exercise, etc. And you have to haul your own water and split your own wood. This is a great system and keeps us hardy.

To me exercise "for no reason or purpose" is the most boring of activities. Then again, if I can keep backpacking thru the year and get a 15 day trip in once a month, well, I feel I'm at least getting some exercise. The beauty of backpacking is that you are getting exercise simply by moving camp every day, a great motivator, plus you're surrounded by beauty. All good incentives.
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  #14  
Old 03-07-2013, 11:26 AM
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mhampton mhampton is offline
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As an experienced camper but relative newbie to backpacking, I was wondering what people did between hikes and in the offseason to stay physically ready when I ran across this older thread. It kind of looks like I'm going to have to endure the boredom of the gym (okay, if you've seen their recent commercials, it's not a gym - it's Planet Fitness) at least until the neighborhood streets and sidewalks are clear enough to get out and walk.
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  #15  
Old 03-07-2013, 06:19 PM
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Bushwalker Bushwalker is offline
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Question

WHAT is an "off season"...
Getting outdoors should be a year-round activity..

I can't get my head around this peculiarly North American (and European) habit of some people giving "seasons" to activities that can be readily adapted to all seasons and weather. (And especially with the likes of that minority of self-styled "hunters" who only use their guns or bows during certain seasons, and never practice otherwise..).

IF people can't go hiking, there's always mountain biking ~ and skiing and snowboarding for those who get snowed in..
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  #16  
Old 03-07-2013, 08:24 PM
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richwads richwads is offline
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Around here (Santa Cruz, California), mushroom hunting gets us out into the (wet) woods. Not that walking along the beach or the cliffs or on the redwood trails isn't enough in itself, but actually looking for something that may or may not be there, that will disappear if you wait too long between hikes, and that may also be a delicacy (mmmmm), is a powerful incentive. Candy caps, oysters, chanterelles, boletes etc just waiting to be found and sauteed . . . .
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  #17  
Old 12-19-2013, 03:10 PM
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Dman Dman is offline
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I actually think I get in better shape during the winter.
I still walk most days, just not in a pretty setting or as long of distance.

I do more weight lifting at home during the winter.
Shoulder / arm workouts with a barbell of weights. Roughly 20 minutes
200+ squats with 45 lbs in my backpack <7 minutes
I plank for 90 seconds 4x throughout the day.

When tax season is done, I'm back out walking and hiking.
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  #18  
Old 12-19-2013, 06:21 PM
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Benwaller Benwaller is offline
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The off-season does not exist in this part of California which is mainly why I live here, having spent a dozen years on an Illinois farm - and the snow came down like BB's pretty much horizontal and at 40 MPH.

Not a fan of any of that.

As to keeping in shape I hike into the local weeds weekly, more or less, with 15-20 pounds of stuff in the bag, ten miles more or less. Daily I walk a couple of miles. Tending the landscape at the house is pretty much a constant and I have experienced a fair amount of sweating doing that work even when it is rainin'.

My bike is my principle mode for errands around town.

All in all I get enough exercise, enough so that no temptation to join a gym has ever crossed my mind.

Off season? Doesn't exist in Sonoma county. Wouldn't live here if it did.



Ben
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  #19  
Old 01-23-2014, 10:31 AM
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crkmeup crkmeup is offline
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I tend to hit the gym almost year round unless I am bike commuting then it is too much of a PITA.

I also add much outdoor time because I love downhill and cross country skiing, snowshoing, and mountaineering. The dogs prefer when I walk them with my skis on.

I really don't have an off season because mother nature offers amazing experiences every season. (you can keep black fly season in the ADKs).
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