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Fishing & Hunting The Fishing & Hunting forum is for discussion (on-site content) that directly relates to wilderness fishing and hunting with an emphasis on engaging in these activities while on backpacking trips. Lightweight/packable gear, personal experience/technique, and trip reports are of central focus. [Reminder: PBF is for actual content, not links/reference to offsite content.]


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  #11  
Old 02-06-2010, 12:04 AM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richwads

I developed a small game handload using 100 grain bullets loaded down, that has no kick and spits it out at 2000 fps and shoots dead on at 100 yd at the same scope setting as a 200 yd zero with 130 grain factory loads. Makes it fun to bag tree squirrels for dinner if the option presents itself . At that velocity the bullet doesn't expand and blow dinner into smithereens.


details, man, details! i've seen literature on .270 as a varmit round, and i'm thinking of three or four possible ways to use it as a small game-primarily rabbit/hares- rifle.
1:a light custom load. this is probably the best option, as i can tailor it to be just right at 100 yards.
2: headshots with a high velocity high-expansion varmit round. the challenging option.
3: SLAP(sabot round). if i can find sabots for .270, i can load up a .22 size bullet, and be able to deliver a round small enough that the damage wouldn't be terrible.

in other news: picked up the rifle today!



the Sears Heritage M-IV, from back when sears sold a few of everything imaginable. the date isn't traceable to anything firmer than the early part of the mid-60s, as there were so many different contractors and makers for sears, and of course they don't have any records...



That is indeed the factory original stock. raised/carved cheekpiece, and some really lovely curl to the wood. there is plenty of character in the stock, and it's in fantastic condition considering that it's heading for fifty years old.

Below is the Mauser type action, with that massive extractor. the safety is surpisingly positive, and the trigger pull is crisp and clean, feels like it's breaking in the 3-4 pound range. i'll be mounting the scope to it as soon as it gets here, i'm using a bushnell trophy with mil-dot reticle.
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  #12  
Old 02-06-2010, 10:27 AM
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richwads richwads is offline
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It's a beautiful rifle, NICE wood grain , and that stock is gonna make for some awesome offhand shooting stability. I would prob'ly try to reduce the gloss with some 0000 steel wool, but that's just me .

OK - details: 21 grains of IMR 4198 with Sierra 110 grain spitzer and CCI-200 primers is what I settled on, with an estimated MV of 1800 fps. I tried a variety of 100 gr bullets, but the 110 Sierra did the best in my rifle.

On the powder: IMR 4198 is "sometimes used for reduced loads in large rifle cartridges", and I think I found this specific charge in an article in an old Reloader's Digest.

The Speer manual no. 11 suggests 20 gr of SR 4759 for a reduced load at 1900 fps, but as I recall, I had already worked out the 4198 loads before picking up that manual, so left well enough alone. If I started over, it would probably be with 4759, tho there are no doubt other loads dreamed up since 1987, that manual's date (my how time flies ).

There's always the old standby: 10 grains of Unique - but that didn't give me the accuracy I wanted, nor the velocity for a decent 100 yard trajectory.
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  #13  
Old 02-06-2010, 10:47 AM
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BlackHills BlackHills is offline
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Very nice Rifle, Shes a beauty,
I too think we sould start a Bush Rifle section for long hikes/hunting. I have several ex military bolt actions that do that job verry well and would be more than happy to post.

Jonathan
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  #14  
Old 02-06-2010, 12:46 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richwads
OK - details: 21 grains of IMR 4198 with Sierra 110 grain spitzer and CCI-200 primers is what I settled on, with an estimated MV of 1800 fps. I tried a variety of 100 gr bullets, but the 110 Sierra did the best in my rifle.

that does sound like it'd be nice and soft. when i get some reloading gear, i'll give it a try. any issues with the reduced powder load(excess space in the case, etc)?


on other notes, yes, the rifle is spectacularly gorgeous. my wife actually 'ack''d over the idea of taking the gloss off. we'll see. i might do a nice dull oil finish. her first words were 'wow, that is beautiful. you didn't say it was so pretty!'(i tried to convey that...).

the bore is in really good shape, which pleases me. there's no slack in the action, and everything slides and works VERY smooth. near as i've been able to learn, it was made by FN, for sears. so those belgians were doing something right back then...(still are. FN's products are worth every penny)

Last edited by dsuursoo : 02-06-2010 at 12:49 PM.
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  #15  
Old 02-06-2010, 01:13 PM
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Mountaineerbass Mountaineerbass is offline
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Gorgeous rifle! I really like the both the grain and the contour.
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  #16  
Old 02-06-2010, 03:37 PM
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richwads richwads is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
any issues with the reduced powder load(excess space in the case, etc)?

Unique is the worst in that regard. 4198 fills about half the case and doesn't seem to have ignition variation problems, as accuracy is good. 4759 is a bulkier powder and is recommended for downloads in rifle cases because it fills the case better, but I haven't tried it.
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  #17  
Old 02-06-2010, 07:06 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richwads
Unique is the worst in that regard. 4198 fills about half the case and doesn't seem to have ignition variation problems, as accuracy is good. 4759 is a bulkier powder and is recommended for downloads in rifle cases because it fills the case better, but I haven't tried it.

aha. one of the cowboy action shooting tricks for their low powered competition loads is to use cotton batting tamped into the casing(not tightly) to keep the powder on the primer.
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  #18  
Old 02-06-2010, 07:33 PM
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richwads richwads is offline
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Now that you mention it, I recall trying that - pain in the a** .

Roll it up tight to fit through the bottleneck, let it expand inside the case, push it down against the powder, seat the slug, shake it to see if it moves .

Hey, if it increases confidence, it increases accuracy !!! (placebo affect?)
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  #19  
Old 02-06-2010, 09:30 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richwads
Now that you mention it, I recall trying that - pain in the a** .

Roll it up tight to fit through the bottleneck, let it expand inside the case, push it down against the powder, seat the slug, shake it to see if it moves .

Hey, if it increases confidence, it increases accuracy !!! (placebo affect?)

well, the cowboy shooters, if they use modern powders(especially in magnum calibers), have a LOT of space left over, and if the powder is spread out, ignition isn't totally reliable. so thus. in a straight walled casing it's easy. in a rifle casing, i dunno if it would have quite so much impact... and using the bulkier powder would make it less than neccesary.
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  #20  
Old 02-07-2010, 09:49 AM
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richwads richwads is offline
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The cowboy shooters' loads may be so tiny that yes, the packing would be required for consistency, and for straight-wall cases it's not as much trouble to do. I tried it for handgun competition (25 and 50 yd slow fire)using .38 wadcutters and 3 grains of Bullseye, which still puts a 148 grain slug out there at 750 fps. With that load I could not find a difference in bench rest accuracy, even tipping the barrel up vs. down between test shots (with the unpacked rounds).

But, like I said, if they're using something like 3 grains of powder in a .45 Colt case or a .30-30 case, that's a whole 'nuther situation. Especially in their typical unpredictable rapid fire here and there shooting.

In our discussion, tho, we're trying to have a decent trajectory for small game out there a ways, so the packing may not have any measurable effect due to the use of significantly more powder to do that.

It will give you an excuse to spend time at the range testing your handloads .

p.s. For what it's worth, I did a little research in my "library" and found this in the 1969 NRA Handloader's Guide article "Ultra-Light Rifle Loads":

"Ignition problems may result if pistol primers are used, unless the powder is held against the flash hole with a light paper wad. With the stronger rifle primers no ignition difficulties were experienced with charges as low as 0.7 gr. of Bullseye loose in 7x57 mm. cases. Rifle primers were used in all our tests and the added step of positioning the powder was eliminated."

Last edited by richwads : 02-07-2010 at 10:32 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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