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Backpacker's Health & Safety The Backpacker's Health & Safety forum is for the discussion of health and safety/survival issues that directly relate to backpackers.


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  #31  
Old 02-27-2009, 01:01 PM
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tonto tonto is offline
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Got all worked up on my last post & forgot to tip you off on what I ALWAYS carry on my person in the woods--even on day hikes:

In my pocket: Swiss pocket knife, water proof military match safe w/strike anywhere matches & a few trick birthday candles, mini lighter, local map, 16 0r 20 oz gator aid bottle W/ sport lid (yes I actually stick the thing in my front pants or coat pocket), small bottle of H2O purifying tablets. On a mini key ring: mini steel whistle & mini mag light (single AAA lithium). nail clippers.

Around my neck: mini base plate compass on a cord.

In my wallet: some band aides.

I learned my lesson the hard way on a Thanksgiving day hike a few years back with my oldest boy, before he got Gung-Ho to join the Army Rangers.
We showed up around 10 am to hike Bigalow Mnt. in Maine. Just as we were locking up my truck I took the small flashlight out of my glove com- partment. I put it back telling myself we where only going on a day hike and would be back before sundown, about 4pm or 5pm.
The trail was iced over and looked like a frozen waterfall in places and slowed us down some. We reached the summit after 1pm and ate a quick lunch. Didn't want to skate down the steep way we came up. So we headed north on the AT to catch a less steep trail down but added another 1.5 miles onto the hike. The trail was rocky and covered with rim ice in spots so that slowed us some too. By 3pm it was getting obvious that we might not get down before sundown so we started to quick walk and jog the trail when we could. We stopped to search for H2O at a tent site that showed a spring on the map, more time lost. About a third of the way down darkness overtook us at 4pm, something not anticipated. We literally felt our way down the trail (on the trail the leaves were packed down, off the trail they weren't). I would stand next to the blazed tree while my son would feel his way ahead until he found the next blazed tree and then call me ahead. Some times we read the map & compass using the light from my watch. My son was excited about the adventure saying it was like the night exercises the Rangers did!! I said, we were getting off the mountain that night because I didn't want to be in the local paper the next day!! The full moon came out and we leap frogged down the trail doing about 1/2 mile/hour. We didn't get back to the truck until 10pm. Could have made better time with the flashlight.
Live & Learn.
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  #32  
Old 03-07-2009, 09:40 AM
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BR360 BR360 is offline
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Twice I have left my camp after dark "for just a few feet" off-trail to take a dump and gotten "lost."

Once I was with friends. I called out for them, but the dense rhodos and their own laughing and cooking around the (loud) stove made it so they couldn't hear me. I wandered about and called for 5 minutes before they responded, and I had gone in the wrong direction.

The other time I was solo. I had actually left a blinking flashlight on my tarp that I thought would help me find camp. After 10 minutes or so, when I thought I might have to spend the night under a fir tree, I finally found camp.

Now, I make sure to carry a few "survival" things with me when I leave camp at night: headlamp, whistle, large trash-bag as an emergency bivy, my flint/steel for making a fire, and a bottle of water.
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  #33  
Old 04-14-2009, 01:24 PM
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manimal2878 manimal2878 is offline
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I carry an Adventure Medical Kits Pocket Survival Pak in my pocket when I'm out adventuring.
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  #34  
Old 09-03-2009, 11:17 AM
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Ted Ted is offline
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A couple of years ago I started the practice of carrying an emergency kit with me whether hiking, kayaking or going somewhere in the car. What I came up with is not original but it is compact and convenient to keep with you. Similar to BOMBERNBR's kit, it's a one liter nalgene bottle containing: space blanket, magnesium fire starter, small butane lighter, waterproof matches, a tea candle, small homemade first aid kit, water purification tablets, small penlight with extra battery, pocket knife, small compass, compact whistle, a few cable ties, a ziplock bag or two, a MRE accessory pack that contains toilet tissue, gum, coffee, sugar, creamer, and six feet of duct tape wrapped around the outside. I even squeezed in a minibottle of rum to celebrate when I make it back alive. This sort of package is light, keeps everything in one place, is waterproof, is easily carried and can be tailored to suit the conditions you might anticipate. Hope this is useful to others.

Ted
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  #35  
Old 09-03-2009, 12:52 PM
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Mountaineerbass Mountaineerbass is offline
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I have a wind up flashlight/am/fm radio/siren/phone charger that I will sometimes take. It is actually lighter than most of the solar chargers I've seen and it does work. It will not completely charge your phone but it will give you a couple of minutes worth of talk time, which could help in an emergency.

I once used it to contact a friend of mine, while I was searching for a lost hiker two years ago. The call got through and he came to help the search party.

I also like the siren for when I am hiking with others, slip fall and have the wind knocked out of you. It is also my backup light to my headlamp, and can be helpful for checking sport scores....
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  #36  
Old 09-03-2009, 03:40 PM
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SSDD SSDD is offline
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This is a topic I have talked over a few times with some old friends that I did survival school with and I still come to the same conclusion but they don't.

That is I am already surviving when I go backpacking and all the gear in my pack is survival gear so why would I take back up as that would be things I would prolly not ever use. Now I do understand the just incase mind set as well as be ready for any thing (as I learned in survival school) but at some point it is just redundant.
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  #37  
Old 09-03-2009, 11:17 PM
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MoondogFiftyfive MoondogFiftyfive is offline
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That is I am already surviving when I go backpacking and all the gear in my pack is survival gear so why would I take back up as that would be things I would prolly not ever use. Now I do understand the just incase mind set as well as be ready for any thing (as I learned in survival school) but at some point it is just redundant.

Well a part of me agrees with you, but I often walk away from the tent and big pack and I have been geographically embarrassed more than a few times so now I take the bum-bag with me when ever I leave camp, especially if I have kids with me, if it's really hot I add an extra waterbottle as well
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  #38  
Old 09-04-2009, 05:27 AM
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SSDD SSDD is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MoondogFiftyfive
Well a part of me agrees with you, but I often walk away from the tent and big pack and I have been geographically embarrassed more than a few times so now I take the bum-bag with me when ever I leave camp, especially if I have kids with me, if it's really hot I add an extra waterbottle as well


I can see how it would be a good idea if you are base camping and going for a day hike. I have been out with others who after setting camp said hey lets go over there so I packed up and took all my stuff with me it is just the way I am I don't leave my gear.
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  #39  
Old 09-10-2009, 09:11 AM
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philman philman is offline
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Backpack: MYOG Cuben, Osprey Atmos 65 AG
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Location: Alton, Illinois
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My current kit includes the following:

Space blanket
Signal mirror
Small compass
Wax dipped matches in waterproof case
Emergency tender and magnesium shavings in waterproof case
Signal mirror
30 Ft. lightweight nylon cord
A couple 1 ft. sq. pieces of aluminum foil
4 Micropur tablets
10 Ft. of duct tape wrapped around a cutoff pencil
A couple of bandaids
Whistle (around neck)
Solitaire Maglite & small multi-tool (in pants pocket)

Everything fits in a sandwich bag but it's kinda bulky and I would love to get it down to a more reasonable size. I would love to hear any suggestions.
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  #40  
Old 09-11-2009, 12:32 AM
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MoondogFiftyfive MoondogFiftyfive is offline
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What are you going to carry water in??

I would add a couple of XL silicon condoms.

I think it is as small as it gets if you do not count the multi tool, but a small LED torch may fit the Emergency role a bit better than the Maglite, I have just replaced my little "Pelican Solo with a disposable LED headlite with a clip
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