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Backpacker's Health & Safety The Backpacker's Health & Safety forum is for the discussion of health and safety/survival issues that directly relate to backpackers.


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  #11  
Old 05-03-2006, 01:56 PM
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no_granola no_granola is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: SE Pennsyltucky
Posts: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by gussomer
I read a post from another site today about how someone carries their essentials in a fanny pack so that if they have to dump their pack during a mishapped water crossing, then they would still have critical gear needed for survival...yes, what an important consideration.

I carry my first aid kit and other 'survival' items (rope, empty water bladder, snacks, knife, whistle, compass, umbrella, etc., . . . ) in a waistpack along with other things I like to keep handy. It also makes for easy trips away from camp, say to an overlook where you can watch the sunset.

I can't believe no one said tequila!
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  #12  
Old 05-03-2006, 04:15 PM
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WildlifeNate WildlifeNate is offline
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Backpack: Osprey Atmos 50
Sleeping Gear: DIY down quilt
Shelter: ENO Doublenest Hammock, WB Bugnet, GG Tarp
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Nacogdoches, TX
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The current wisdom regarding snakebite kits is twofold.

1: The Sawyer Extractor is the only one that's remotely effective when used correctly. Even then, all it does is buy you a little more time to get real medical attention.

2: The margin for error when using one of these is VERY slim. To do any good, you have to use it very quickly after being bitten. If you can't get to it in time, it's useless weight.

Add to this the fact that most North American snakes are not lethal to adults, and it's generally recommended to immobilize the bitten area to reduce blood flow and the spread of the venom, and either send someone out to get help or slowly take the victim out of the woods. This is practicable in many areas, but not all.

I personally do not carry a snakebite kit because of their marginal effectiveness and because most places I end up hiking are close enough to civilization that evacuation is possible.
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  #13  
Old 05-03-2006, 05:17 PM
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gussomer gussomer is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Cache Valley, Utah
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WildlifeNate
The current wisdom regarding snakebite kits...
Nate, thanks for your reply. I actually posted a thorough response to my own question, which everybody can find in the safety section of BPF. I spent a few hours looking for reputable and up to date info. You'll be happy to know that your response was pretty good. The worthiness of the Sawyer device is up for debate based on what I read.
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  #14  
Old 05-03-2006, 07:20 PM
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Bbbluee Bbbluee is offline
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Backpack: Aarn
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Oregon
Posts: 99
Light and Easy Safety

I carry most things in my pack. But around my neck is a light weight whistle, and a photon light.

Another excellent book is 98.6 Degrees: The Art of Keeping Your Ass Alive

I read and followed much of the advice in this lively book.
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  #15  
Old 05-03-2006, 11:05 PM
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Moleskin Moleskin is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Reedley, CA.
Posts: 25
I carry a 6 foot piece of stainless steel 20 gage wire for snaring or fishing. Flint for fires and a small 1.5 in. folding knife. These are secured in nylon pouch that is velcroed inside my pants pocket.
Also a large bag of common sense.
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  #16  
Old 05-05-2006, 08:20 AM
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twokniveskatie twokniveskatie is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: PA
Posts: 28
Cody Lundin is my hero. i love how he combines primitive skills with modern .

my survival necklace is based on his book. i actually have several versions.

i do not use a breakaway necklace, not since the prison anyway. i've read alot recently about the wisdom of doing so. i'm worried how strong they are.

my survival stuff centers around sharp things (who'da thought!) and fire. my necklace has a swedish mora knife, a photon freedom microlight, and a mini lighter, duct tape, line and hook. a schrade simon is my constant companion, separate from my others. (i didn't get my screen name for nothing).

i usually wear a macabi skirt, and keep essentials in those wonderful pockets! that's where my necklace usually is, anyhow.
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  #17  
Old 03-15-2008, 01:59 PM
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Rickosovitch Rickosovitch is offline
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Join Date: May 2007
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Emergency Survival Kit

One thing I always carry, even on day hikes, is my emergency survival kit. If I ever were to get separated from my pack by bear, cougar, two-legged skunk or act of god, this is what I would rely on to keep me alive. A watertight ziploc bag, two dozen water purification tabs, an emergency blanket, a heavy duty disposable lighter, a swiss steel and striker, a bag of magnesium filings (if you've ever tried to scrape off filings in the bush you know why I do this ahead of time) and a folded sheet of aluminum foil, all tucked into a second ziploc bag. It weight 4.5 oz. and goes in the same thigh pocket in my hiking pants every time. Nothing else ever goes in that pocket. Anybody else carry anything like this?
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  #18  
Old 03-17-2008, 11:18 AM
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tpeterson1959 tpeterson1959 is offline
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Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Posts: 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality
Other than what would be included in the 10 Essentials, is there any survival gear that you normally carry?

Reality

My destination and the time of year play a roll in what I carry.

In addition to the Updated 10 Essentials (follow Reality's link!), I always also carry a second space blanket (I most often hike with my wife, who also carries the Updated 10 Essentials – the second blanket is for additional shelter and signaling), 25 feet of 12 lbs test monofilament (for snares), a heavy plastic, sightable signal mirror, a “rape” whistle, and Cotton balls with petroleum jelly in an old pill bottle.

Which brings up, for me, perhaps the single most important item I take with me – a week’s supply of my medications in individually marked mini zip-lock baggies.

I take a BP med that if not taken in regular intervals, has the potential of causing a stroke (hereditary BP issues really suck). I received instructions from my doctor on how to properly reduce the dosage to zero in the event of an emergency, but in order to do it; I need a full week of medication.

With my meds, I also carry ibuprofen, acetaminophen, and aspirin (when used in combination, the three will deaden most any pain without having to resort to mega-doses).

Looking at the other lists, I saw a few items that Hoosierdaddy listed that I think will be really great additions:

• Colored surveyors tape (3 – 4 feet) (I’m adding some florescent orange surveyor’s tape right away, possibly as much as fifty feet depending on the weight – which shouldn’t be very much. It can be easily seen and can be very useful for tying things together if needed.)
• A flexible plastic drinking tube, 3 feet long (I used to carry 3 feet of plastic tubing – I don’t remember what happened to it.)
• Collapsible 1-2 gallon water container (In Panama, we carried un-lubricated condoms, I don’t know why I never added them to my kit.)
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  #19  
Old 03-17-2008, 12:19 PM
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IceAge IceAge is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 48
I put together a kit based on the small kit found in John Wiseman's SAS Survival Handbook.

It all fits in an Altoids tin that I sealed with a few windings of duct tape. He makes the point that your kit needs to be small enough to fit easily in a pocket so that you will actually take it. Mine usually sits in the glove box of my car along with a few extras, but it goes into a pocket when I'm out hunting, or into a pocket on a fanny pack for a short hike.
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  #20  
Old 05-21-2008, 05:18 AM
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gunn_parker gunn_parker is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 82
Survival kit

Hi All
I have not seen a thread about Survival kits, so I am just wondering what others do?
Do you carry a purpose built, by yourself Survival kit? if so what are the contents? what does it weigh?
I have read Cody Lundin's book 98.6 the Art of Keeping Your Ass Alive and I have started to put together a kit suitable for my area and I'd like to hear from you guys.
Thanks
Gunn
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