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Backpacker's Health & Safety The Backpacker's Health & Safety forum is for the discussion of health and safety/survival issues that directly relate to backpackers.


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  #101  
Old 02-23-2011, 06:00 PM
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MoondogFiftyfive MoondogFiftyfive is offline
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Yes; but any method of carrying is better than loading your pockets or even worse hand holding and dropping off a cliff or into a deep river
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  #102  
Old 02-23-2011, 08:09 PM
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Ralph Ralph is offline
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I suggest cross-carry for a shoulder bag - strap on right shoulder, bag under left arm (if right-handed) - unless you have functional epaulets on shirt/jacket. Make a simple strap pad from an 8" piece of 2" webbing that slides onto the thinner shoulder strap. Sewing non-skid material to the underside of the strap pad helps some, too.

When you get down to it, your pack IS a survival kit. Most of the items in what we think of as a survival kit are redundant. However, making them up into a separate kit makes them less likely to be used routinely and so, will be there when you most urgently need them.

I have a Marble's matchsafe given to me as a birthday present in the early 1950s. I waterproofed some strike-anywhere kitchen matches with clear nail polish and put them in the matchsafe, along with a couple of sewing needles. This was my emergency match supply, never to be used routinely. In the 60-some years since that matchsafe has been with me - backpacking, canoeing, army field exercises, you name it. Too many thousand days and nights to count. As it happened, I always had some other way to make fire so none of those matches were ever used. A couple of years ago I thought I'd see if the matches were still good, so I took one out, dropped it in a glass of water to check the waterproofing and after a few minutes took it out, shook it off and struck it. It lit just fine.

Make up a kit and resist the urge to save an ounce or two by using the contents to replace a first aid kit, a repair kit or whatever. The survival kit needs to be there when you desperately need it.
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  #103  
Old 02-24-2011, 07:01 PM
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richwads richwads is offline
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Shelter: Tarp
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph
I suggest cross-carry for a shoulder bag - strap on right shoulder, bag under left arm (if right-handed) - unless you have functional epaulets on shirt/jacket. Make a simple strap pad from an 8" piece of 2" webbing that slides onto the thinner shoulder strap. Sewing non-skid material to the underside of the strap pad helps some, too.
Good idea! I tried it, extending one strap longer so I could get my head and left arm thru it. The pack hung sideways (i.e. zipper vertical) under my left arm with the zipper on the front, and the other strap (now the "lower" one) easily goes around my body. I'll find something to pad the narrow shoulder strap and take it for a walk.

thanks!
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  #104  
Old 05-24-2011, 08:37 PM
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richwads richwads is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richwads
At the risk of appearing to be a significant risk-taker , I will post the contents of my "survival ditty": headlamp, waterproof matches, CLO2, first aid kit, mirror, rope, sewing kit, opinel knife, mini fishing kit.

This is a ditty that goes with me when I leave camp on a day hike, usually along with a pancho, tp, water, snack, etc. If I'm after game, there will be more that will supplement this, like a deer bag, fixed blade knife, the jacket I had on in the wee hours when I hit the trail, etc.

I have never had to spend the night out, solely dependent on this gear. I notice some posts list stuff I've never even taken backpacking , making me feel like I've lived a charmed life .

OK then, my buddy and I are gonna take a hike up the road a few miles with only the clothes on our back and our ditty bags plus water, snack, tp and pancho and see how it goes in the woods overnight. This isn't to prove anything one way or another about what one might "need" for every survival situation, but to see how our own minds deal with this SUL packing style. Base weight: 2 lb more or less.

Well, we finally pulled it off. I added a windbreaker, stocking cap, space emergency blanket/bag, camera, and a pound of trail mix and ended up with 4.5 lb including the Flash 50 top pocket it was carried in.

Here I am at our destination -



We built a brush shelter and slept in our clothes inside our illuminized mylar sleeping bags. Temperature was mild, high around 65, low 45, now we bin there dun that .

I'll post pics of the brush shelter soon.

The pics will be in the Bushcraft/bush shelter thread.

Last edited by richwads : 05-25-2011 at 06:12 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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  #105  
Old 07-09-2011, 09:57 AM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Admin Note: To encourage further on-topic discussion, the subject of this thread is being reposted here:

Quote:
Other than what would be included in the so-called 10(+) Essentials, is there any survival gear that you normally carry for backpacking?

Thank you for your participation.

Reality
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  #106  
Old 07-23-2014, 06:34 PM
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Ryan_W Ryan_W is offline
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Backpack: SIx Moons Designs Fusion 65
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I'm a bit of an amateur still to backpacking so this has been a very informative thread as I'm currently refining my own survival kit. I carry a fanny pack with my Survival and FA/repair kit in it along with my trail snacks. (I do like the idea of a vacuum sealed "last resort kit" carried on my person though and may develop one myself).

I would like to add one of the augments I have made to mine when it comes to duct tape. I use neon orange tape for it's ability to be found or retrace one's steps accurately if lost.

When I was 11, I got lost in the woods on a day hike and ended up traversing the wrong peak (My cousin and brother had me stay behind to wait for the adults because I was slow, but I decided that I'd have none of that...) After realizing that I was on the wrong peak, I tried to bushwack back to the peak my family was on, only to get caught in a broken semi circle of dangerous traverses. I was smart enough to not try scaling the sides, but trying to find the way back out towards where I had entered the area was difficult. I ended up making crude trail markers with my own special formation of sticks set in the small snow patches and made my way out with some trial and error back to the ridge I had originally used as a "scouting position".

From that experience, I feel that trail tape is a great asset if you're lost because it makes it easier to mark your way back, as well as leading a trail for SAR. Perhaps it's just something that sticks out in my head from wishing I had an easy way to blaze my trail, but I feel like if you're going to bring duct tape, you might as well bring the signal orange.
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  #107  
Old 08-10-2014, 12:51 PM
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Ralph Ralph is offline
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Awhile ago I picked up a Mountainsmith Buzz lumbar pack from an auction. The Buzz is very light and consists of a belt, two water bottle pockets, two side pockets and a smallish (probably around 120 cu. inches) back pocket. Originally I was thinking to cut off the back pocket and use the rest as a belt for an ultralight pack. Once I got the thing, though, I realized that cutting off the back pocket in a neat way would not be easy, so I tossed it on the shelf, figuring I would probably sell it.

I still wanted a light day pack and one day I really started looking at the Buzz. A light day pack really doesn't need a load-bearing belt and the more I looked at the Buzz the more I liked it. First, without gear it weighs less than 8 oz. and is very comfortable to wear with "just enough" padding. The belt is very adjustable with a side-release buckle and belt ends that tuck neatly under the side pockets so you don't have dangling straps. The zippers are the water-resistant type so are a bit stiff in action but this also means they are unlikely to creep open.

I have two 17 oz. aluminum oval water bottles with my monogram laser-engraved that fit the bottle pockets perfectly. For whatever reason I have never needed much water, even in arid environments so these smaller bottles suit me fine.
[There isn't room in the Buzz for a cup, but water can be heated in the aluminum water bottles. There is a loop atop the back pocket that can carry an old Rocky stainless steel cup (a better design but reminiscent to the Sierra cup if I am not carrying the small backpack.]

The main pocket in the back is a little awkward, being sort of conical, but as I worked up the load-out this turned out to be a non-problem. Since there are no shoulder straps it is easy to slide the back to the front so I can access that pocket without removing the belt.

Essentially, the way it worked out I use the back pocket for survival/emergency overnight gear and the side pockets for small items I want ready to hand.

Main (center) pocket contains:
Rain Notes pad, set plastic survival cards,
[Make a note, leave a not on waterproof paper. I always carry a Fisher Space pen in my shirt pocket. The survival cards have useful information. My advice is as soon as you realize your confusion, sit down, brew a hot drink, and read one of the cards. By the time you do that any incipient panic will be gone. Mostly, the cards remind me of the signals used for aerial rescue - since I have never used them I forget the patterns.]

Silver rescue blanket, AMK Heat Sheet,
[The silver blanket can be rigged as a shelter or pinned to a tarp, creating more light and reflected heat from a fire. The Heat Sheet is more pliable and stronger, better to wrap in.

Eze-Lap diamond card hone-Fine, plastic fresnel lens, SSI signal mirror,
[If you carry a knife you need something to keep it sharp, for us older guys the lens helps with fine detail, the flat signal mirror is basic gear and can be seen for many miles.]

AMK Travelers first aid kit, 6 chlorine dioxide tablets,
[Just basic adhesive bandages and medications and water purification - half a tablet per bottle]
K&M matchsafe [waterproofed SA matches],
[Matches are alternatives to the other methods I carry for fire-making, the K&M also has a small Suunto compass in the cap]

Victorinox Farmer knife, Gerber Dime multi-tool, mini-EMT shears,
[The Farmer is one of the best utility knife patterns and includes a small wood saw. The Dime is a compact tool including a small pair of pliers. I can cut most anything with a knife, but the shears are sometimes easier to use and cut fabric, leather and webbing. There is also a small wire-cutting notch.]

Gerber AA lithium LED Task Light, 30 ft. bankline, coil of thin brass wire,
[A good, basic light. The lithium batteries have a 10-year shelf life, work in cold weather and have a substantially longer run-time than alkalines. They also don't "juice up" in storage. Light bankline (tarred nylon cord) is perfect for lashing gear together from light saplings. The wire has myriad uses.]

Frontier water purification straw.
[The straw is a very compact and effective was to get a quick drink].

L. belt pocket: Exotac Polystriker, inspirator, packet Tinder-Quik, packet small strike-anywhere matches, Djeep butane lighter,
[This is my fire kit. The Polystriker is a ferroceramic rod that produces large sparks when scraped with the included blade. The inspiratory is a rubber tube about 18" long, tipped with a 3" piece of brass tubing used to blow the fire alive. Much better than flapping your hat of getting your face in the dirt.]

R. belt pocket: trail food & snacks

This gives me all needed basic gear in a compact form.

I made a small backpack that rides above the belt gear that carries additional gear and supplies. I also carry small gear in my pockets, on a neck chain and on my belt. Flat pouches aren't uncomfortable under the belt.
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