Practical Backpacking™ Forums

Welcome to Practical Backpacking™ Forums (PBF).

You are currently viewing PBF as a guest which has limited access. By becoming a PBF member, you will have full access to view and participate in tens of thousands of informative discussions, to view links and attachments (photos), and will gain access to other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free! Click to Become a PBF Member! Be sure to also explore the Practical Backpacking Podcast.


Go Back   Practical Backpacking™ Forums > Practical Backpacking™ General Outdoors (Backpacking Related) > Camping
HOME FAQ PBF GUIDELINES BLOG PODCAST GALLERY STORE CALENDAR Mark Forums Read

Camping The Camping forum is for discussion that relates directly to wilderness camping (commonly referred to as car camping).


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 08-10-2009, 06:11 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Eagleeye- Eagleeye- is offline
Practical Backpacking™ New Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Europe
Posts: 15
Recently had a very nice and unforgetable canoeing trip in Sweden with 3 kids 3, 4 and 6 yo. Actually everyone loved it !
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 08-12-2009, 07:50 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Mountaineerbass Mountaineerbass is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Backpack: Osprey Aether
Sleeping Gear: Big Agnes Lost Ranger
Shelter: REI Quarter Dome
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Virginia
Posts: 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eagleeye
Recently had a very nice and unforgetable canoeing trip in Sweden with 3 kids 3, 4 and 6 yo. Actually everyone loved it !

I just took my 10 month, and 2 year old on a camping trip (just about 200m from the car), with several day canoe trips with my 2 year old. I can't wait to take him on a full fledged canoe trip, hopefully next year! Any tips?
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 08-13-2009, 08:21 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Laurie Laurie is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Backpack: Granite Gear
Sleeping Gear: MEC Raptor
Shelter: Eureka!
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 338
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mountaineerbass
I just took my 10 month, and 2 year old on a camping trip (just about 200m from the car), with several day canoe trips with my 2 year old. I can't wait to take him on a full fledged canoe trip, hopefully next year! Any tips?

Yes... lots of tips (I might have posted some before so excuse any repetition). I'm actually teaching a workshop on this in Algonquin Park next summer.
  • In the beginning you'll want to make sure there aren't any really long portages on your trips. If your child is an infant you'll have to plan portaging careful. Most parents I know use a backpack designed for carrying a child. One person is responsible for the baby and the other(s) take care of the gear. With children aged four and up it is a little different. We've taken nieces, nephews and our own boy canoeing and it amazes me how much the kids embrace portaging. We take frequently stops to looks at plants, bugs, mushrooms, rocks and such and I think it is this exploration approach that seems to make the portages fun.
  • Keep the days fairly short as they get bored in the canoe. Get a canoe seat (the SeaLine one is great) and let the little one sit in the bottom of the canoe on it - in front of the stern paddler - give them a few little toys to play with.
  • As they get older let them have their own map and compass - even if they are too young to learn how to use it the map makes them feel important.
  • Campsite safety is often a concern. Many times you can eliminate many of the potential hazards by merely choosing the right campsite. Sometimes things happen and you end up with a site that is less than ideal. This happened to us on occasion. One particular island site had a very cliffy side. We brought the canoe up and laid it parallel to the shore on the cliff side and instructed our little one that he was not to go beyond the canoe. You can also use marker tape to section off an area. This works well with school-age children but not so well with toddlers who are more adventurous.
  • Also check the area they are playing in for mushrooms frequently especially if base camping - kids like to put things in their mouths and last year my friend had too close of a call with her 1 year old.
  • In the book Cradle to Canoe the authors, Rolf and Debra Kraiker, recommend a tether system made by tying a rope between two trees that are in a safe spot on the campsite and using a second section of rope with a carabiner attached to each end. One of the carabiners is attached to the main rope and the other to the child's life jacket. Then you put the life jacket on the child and this keeps the little one out of trouble. Remember that you still have to keep a close eye on the child but this does make it easier to start camp chores.
  • Biting bugs can also be an issue. I don't recommend using adult strength DEET on a child. In fact I prefer to use children's strength DEET as little as possible. Bug hats and jackets are much better, as well as long-sleeved shirts and pants. If the bugs are bad tuck their pants into their socks.
  • Rainwear is important. It seems to rain on every single one of our trips. Have a raincoat or anorak for the child along with rain pants. A pair of rubber boots is a good idea too. You'd be amazed what neat things you can find by exploring camp on a rainy day. Keeping warm and dry is paramount though.
  • First aid is important. I make sure I have all the standard first aid items in my pack but I also bring some Batman band-aids and such. For some reason the hurt seems lessened when they have a fancy band-aid on it. I also pack electrolyte replacement crystals and a children's pain reliever.
  • Bedtime can sometimes be difficult. Our little guy was afraid of the dark. One of our friends brought along the neon bracelets and other neon items that you can find at the dollar store. These were amazing. Not only was he more visible but at bedtime we hung the neon item from the gear loft in our tent and it acted like a night light. I was usually the one responsible for bedtime so I would go into the tent and tell him a story or if my imagination wasn't all that great I would let him look at the images on the screen of the digital camera, We'd talk about the photos and the trip and then he would go to sleep.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 08-14-2009, 07:40 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Mountaineerbass Mountaineerbass is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Backpack: Osprey Aether
Sleeping Gear: Big Agnes Lost Ranger
Shelter: REI Quarter Dome
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Virginia
Posts: 250
Great info. laurie.

One neat thing to take is a flora/fauna and fungi identification booklets. It can be fun to use for identification and may help out when someone eats something the shouldn't.

I had to be rushed to the hospital to have my stomach pumped after I had eaten some berries, when I was ~4. A story my family loves to tell.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 08-18-2009, 01:34 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Sparticus Sparticus is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
Backpack: ULA
Sleeping Gear: JacksRBetter Quilt
Shelter: Hammock
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: NS, Canada
Posts: 16
Kids will often surprise you in the backwoods. My first trip with my son (he was 6) to a lone camp sight in a national park. It was a great spot because we didn’t have to walk very far. The rangers stopped by and asked if my son would like to see something cool. We go down to the portage point on the lake and there was a snake and a frog having a stand-off. He was hooked on camping that day.

Our second trip was a winter camping trip when he was 7. As a first trip on snowshoes, we went back to the same spot in the National Park, but with the access road closed, it meant a 4km snowshoe walk to camp. When we set up camp, I realized that I left my camera in the car. We walked out to the car to get it, and then headed back to our campsite. A 12 km walk for a 7 year old – they can really surprise you when they get the bug.



Third trip was a 7 day canoe trip 6 months later. Our kids today grow up with lots of stimuli, but one thing I took away from that trip was when you remove all the day-to-day stimuli and put a kid in the back woods, their little personalities start to bloom. On the second day of the trip I see him sitting on a rock just looking out while I’m cooking dinner. I ask Shamus if he is board, he replies “no dad, I’m just thinking, I like being out here because it gives me time to think”. The then started talking about everything in his little life and didn’t stop of 5 days. There is no better way to connect with your kids!

As I started going more ultra-light, it made it even more fun for my son. We build pulks together for our next trip and it increased our range.

Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 08-18-2009, 05:31 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
now that my son's learned how to swim(well, float with control of his direction while wearing a vest. it counts), i've been earnestly considering a canoe expedition, maybe up part of the columbia river, next year, for father's day weekend. a few days of paddling about, exploring and panning for gold sounds like a blast to me.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 08-18-2009, 05:40 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
tonto tonto is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 471
Sounds like great prospects. Hope things pan out. (Hey, I just had to say it!)
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 08-18-2009, 06:20 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonto
Sounds like great prospects. Hope things pan out. (Hey, I just had to say it!)

well, if you were digging for a nugget of humor, you certainly hit pay dirt!

i don't mean to flake out, but i had to mine the vein of humor too.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 08-18-2009, 08:10 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Sparticus Sparticus is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
Backpack: ULA
Sleeping Gear: JacksRBetter Quilt
Shelter: Hammock
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: NS, Canada
Posts: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
..i've been earnestly considering a canoe expedition ...

Canoe expeditions are worth doing. You can generally carry more (portages can be a little more work for dad), you can take advantage of swimming holes, and you can fish - all things kids love to do. When I did my trip with my son, my friend lent me a canoe barrel. It proved so handy I purchased one when I got home; not what you consider ultra-light kit, but keeps your gear dry and can be used for lots of stuff.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 08-19-2009, 08:42 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Laurie Laurie is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Backpack: Granite Gear
Sleeping Gear: MEC Raptor
Shelter: Eureka!
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 338
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparticus
Canoe expeditions are worth doing. You can generally carry more (portages can be a little more work for dad), you can take advantage of swimming holes, and you can fish - all things kids love to do. When I did my trip with my son, my friend lent me a canoe barrel. It proved so handy I purchased one when I got home; not what you consider ultra-light kit, but keeps your gear dry and can be used for lots of stuff.

I'm of the opposite mind but then again it isn't unusual for me to plan 10 km or more of portaging in a given day. The only things that we take that aren't in our regular backpacking kit are... the canoe, the bailer kit (includes throw-rope, whistle and flashlight and is the law here), our PFD's and a lightweight canoe seat for the dog (so he doesn't get wet if water gets in the bottom of the canoe from rain or what-not). One other thing we do is keep the food in a separate pack. That way it gets carried with the canoe and the packs are a little lighter. It splits things up nicely and makes the portaging more pleasant. I could just put the food in our packs like we do for backpacking but this just makes it really easy to deal with when it comes time to hanging.

I also detest canoe barrels (I wish I could think of a stronger word - I really hate them with a passion). Many people use them for food - wrongly assuming that they are bearproof and that they don't have to hang the barrel. Barrels don't lay nicely in the canoe either and they take up far too much room. The other issue is that if they aren't completely full (which happens as food stores deplete) the weight inside can shift horribly on a portage not to mention that they just aren't comfortable to carry. We, as I said earlier, take a separate day pack for the food. It weighs 1/6 th of what a 60 L barrel does when empty and it is easier to hang in a tree. It fits better in the canoe too - behind the stern seat... and acts somewhat as a backrest for the stern paddler.

Here is a photo of Bryan with the food pack and the canoe (a Wenonah Prospector 16)...



He rests the yoke of the canoe on the pack straps which makes it much more comfortable to carry (instead of a yoke digging into his shoulders). We use canoe style packs in the canoe and Tobias sits on the back of one of them as there is no middle seat.

Of course, one has to keep in mind that we are portaging rugged terrain. These aren't often flat portages but moreso rough, rocky and rooty climbs to the next lake which can often have a higher elevation. Some of the portages are so steep that we've had to use rope, placing the canoe almost vertical and it took two of us to get it up the rocky incline. Other portages can be as flat as a logging road but several kilometers long. It just depends on the trip so ensure you have a map that shows the contours or you might be in for a surprise.

With all the weight I have lost I am having trouble getting the canoe pack to fit me comfortably (it shifts a bit now especially at the shoulders and I can't seem to adjust it enough) so I will probably be going back to my backpacking pack for the next trip - I haven't decided yet.

Last edited by Laurie : 08-19-2009 at 11:47 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:45 AM.

Backpacking Forums


Powered by vBulletin Version 3.5.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2006-2017 Practical Backpacking™
Practical Backpacking is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacker is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Podcast is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Magazine is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™