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Backpacks The Backpacks forum is for the discussion of backpacking packs (including front packs and pack accessories: hipbelt pockets, pack covers,...).


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  #11  
Old 08-11-2014, 02:12 PM
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tonto tonto is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 471
As far as internal frame packs go.

I've also noticed that Osprey packs are very popular on the AT
Especially, with long distance hikers.
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  #12  
Old 08-11-2014, 03:54 PM
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Grandpa Grandpa is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Backpack: GoLite Pinnacle
Sleeping Gear: Moonstone Lucid 800 w/Neo Air pad
Shelter: Tarptent Sublite Tyvek & Tarptent Double Rainbow
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 430
My "hauler" pack is a GoLite Pinnacle, which is frameless. The current equivalent model is the GoLite Jam. It is a fairly cavernous 70L, however, it has their ComPACTor system, which consists of adjustable straps and hooks on the sides and bottom to cinch the pack in a way that the volume is lessened, allowing it to be filled with a less bulky load and still ride properly on your back. Before I got the Pinnacle, I had a GoLite Speed pack, which didn't have anything like that and was more uncomfortable when not filled because smaller loads would collect at the bottom. The Jam weighs less than two pounds.
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  #13  
Old 08-18-2014, 05:46 AM
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cmseeley cmseeley is offline
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Shelter: JRB Tarp
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Horseheads, NY
Posts: 14
I ended up getting a Kelty Redcloud 90. I got this one sight unseen from REI based on the Coyote 80 from dicks. Rei had it on closeout, so I figured I was getting the next model up for a better price and I liked the coloration better for this older model over the new model Coyote. So far, It is great! The pockets are well laid out, material seems strong. Fits me very well. All in all at this point, I think this will be a good start for an all propose pack for me.

Friday night, I took it on a quick overnight trip. I had too much for a typical overnight (on propose for extra weight), but had plenty of room in the pack for a ton more. I could gear up for a week or more with room to spare in this pack. Although it was way under loaded, the pack cinched up good and was very comfortable. I only hiked about 1/2 mile to camp (as shown on the map), but the last 1/10th mile or less was pretty much straight up the side of the hill with plenty of loose leaves to slip on. So this was a good test of the gravity vs balance fight. I am a "happy camper" for now. Only thing I am not sure of is the strength of the outside tie on points on the bottom. This is my first internal frame pack. I tied an older ozark trails (Heavy as hell) backpacking tent to the bottom, as I took my step son with me (he is still a little insecure out in the wilderness), and I was a little unsure of it.

Thanks for all the insight and advise!!

Best,

Chris
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  #14  
Old 08-18-2014, 07:20 AM
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badwolf badwolf is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
Backpack: Granite Gear Leopard 58 AC KI or Deuter Aircontact 50L
Sleeping Gear: Thermarest NeoLite XL womens, Big Agnes Roxy Ann
Shelter: Big Agnes Copper Spur UL1
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Ohio
Posts: 45
Hi Chris,

Congratulations on the great pack!

As far as tying the tent on the bottom... my experience is you want heavy items inside the main compartment, close to your back, mid-back area. That will help keep your center of gravity in a more natural place.

Having a heavy object on the outside of your pack generally results on it pulling you over backwards.

Don't roll up the tent and put it in the original stuff sack. Just loosely stuff the tent and fly inside the pack. (I bring a big lightweight kitchen garbage bag to stuff it in if the tent is wet). Put the poles on the outside of your pack along the side or elsewhere if you wish.

Personally, the only thing I have outside my pack are my tent poles. Everything else is inside.

It may be the "tie out points" you refer to are really ice axe loops? Not sure on your pack. The most I'd consider tying down there is a lightweight foam sleep pad or similar. Nothing heavy... it's just gonna pull you off balance.

Congrats again. Send pictures!

Shannon
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  #15  
Old 08-20-2014, 09:07 PM
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GGervin GGervin is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Forums Moderator
Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
Sleeping Gear: REI ThermoPod +0 mummy, MH 3D +40 mummy
Shelter: SD Superflash, GoLite Hut 1
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: California
Posts: 436
REI closeouts can be a very good buy if you get the right thing. I did a search on the pack you got just to see it. Looks like you got a good one!

Badwolf is right about loading the pack and how it affects wearing. Now that you have it, you should definitely research how to load an internal frame. My packing experience can vary greatly depending on how I load my internal frames. Generally the rules you used for external frames don't apply.

If you like the pack now, wait till you see what you think of it after you've researched loading it!

Last edited by GGervin : 08-20-2014 at 09:09 PM.
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  #16  
Old 08-25-2014, 07:21 AM
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cmseeley cmseeley is offline
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Shelter: JRB Tarp
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Horseheads, NY
Posts: 14
Badwolf, Ggervin, thanks for the tips. I will research proper packing techniques.

Next time I take the tent, I will put the poles on the outside, and put the rest inside.

I will take a pic next time I get a chance.

Best,

Chris
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  #17  
Old 09-12-2014, 06:25 PM
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Benwaller Benwaller is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Backpack: Camelbak RimRunner, Osprey Volt 60, Kelty Redwing 50
Sleeping Gear: Kelty LightYear Down 20 / ENO Doublenest Hammock
Shelter: Granite Gear White Lightnin' tarp
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sonoma County, CA
Posts: 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by badwolf
Hi Chris,

Personally, the only thing I have outside my pack are my tent poles. Everything else is inside.

Shannon

+1. You have a 90 liter pack, you should not need to put anything other than your poles on the outside of that bag even if you're carrying some of your son's stuff.

I used a big bag pretty much all the time when the kids were little as at that stage of my development I was pretty much the affable mule, appointed by unanimous consent, and I wanted to make sure they learned to love the woods. Which of course they did and still do. Nowadays I enjoy having them carry it when the mission is hauling the beer and the barbeque down to wherever the festival is happening. No one complains. Whoever draws the short straw considers it a privilege.

Otherwise that old Gregory stays in the gear closet loaded for emergency use here in earthquake country. Re-purposing is always a good idea.

My current go-to bag is an Osprey Volt 60 - inexpensive, durable, highly adjustable and I recommend it without reservation.

My typical week-long summer load, all consumables and with 2 liters of water carried, comes in just south of 29 pounds so I don't need a hauler. It's just me and my bride and she's using a GoLite Jam2 which, she has informed me many times (once or twice practically sternly) is the only bag that she ever intends to carry. So some of her stuff is in my Volt, too. Rank has its privileges clearly.

Which I consider an excuse to procure lighter gear. This we understand to be the quintessential win-win circumstance and I do exercise my perogatives.

Yeah, and we are also sleeping in the trees these days, having finally figured out how to do hammocking. Old dogs do learn new tricks but only so long as they keep moving.

There are lots of ways to do the woods, but first and foremost enjoy every minute of it. That's the best way, do it like that.

You'll thank yourself for it later.

Ben
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  #18  
Old 09-16-2014, 02:48 PM
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KBob KBob is offline
Practical Backpacking™ New Member
Backpack: GG
Sleeping Gear: North Face Ibex
Shelter: HH Asyn
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 11
Take the time to find and travel to an outdoor shop. Try on different packs with a min 20 lb load. Walk around in the shop. Test and compare, before you buy. "Anyone can go out into the woods and be miserable."
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