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Wilderness Photography The Wilderness Photography forum is for the discussion of photography (videography) gear, experience, and technique as it directly relates to wilderness photography. PBF members may also post self-owned photos that have been uploaded to the PB Gallery or as post attachments. Offsite links and offsite photos are prohibited. Please see ("sticky") instructional post located at top of threads.


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  #11  
Old 07-26-2006, 08:50 AM
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Cossoft Cossoft is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2006
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Has anyone considered a bean bag? You can either buy a proper bean bag style camera thingie with an integral screw mount, or just use a real bean bag. I have one that's a proper one from a camera shop. It's about 150mm in diameter and 40mm thick with a screw mount in the centre.

Their advantage is that you can put a SLR camera on it, along with a large lens. Just rest the lens on the bag instead of the camera. Total stability for large kit for little weight and dead tough.

I also sometimes use a large Manfrotto with a ball head. Not heavy at all when it's in the truck!


P.S. Have to agree with 3Pinner that the discipline of composition gives you better photos when using a full size tripod.
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  #12  
Old 07-26-2006, 10:17 PM
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kvolk kvolk is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Utah
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I carry a home made monopod. I took an aluminum arrow shaft and removed the feathers and nock. The pointed end where the nock was is the end that I push into the ground. I cut the shaft in half (shorter and easier to carry in two pieces)and put a small piece of dowel in one of the cuts. The other end slides over the dowel to join the two pieces when putting the monopod back together. At the camera end I have glued a small nylon bolt piece that fits the tripod threads on my camera. This whole thing is less than an ounce. The disadvantage is that with my 4 oz camera it tends to sway a little in the wind if it is blowing pretty hard. Easy to carry and weighs almost nothing, cheap, and works OK for me. Of course it isn't the answer for those needing a real tripod for macro work but for self portraits, stabilization in low light and pivoting for panorama shots it seems to work OK for me. I can't claim credit for this idea I got it from "Flyfishing the Rocky Mountain Backcountry".
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  #13  
Old 08-06-2006, 04:12 PM
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3Pinner 3Pinner is offline
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Join Date: May 2006
Location: Virginny
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Cossoft,
I use a variation of the beanbag sometimes - my pack.
I take the pack off & lay the camera on it like a bean bag.
(Usually on a rest stop of course)
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  #14  
Old 08-06-2006, 05:22 PM
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Cossoft Cossoft is offline
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I'm very interested in using a rucksack as a bean bag. 3Pinner, I've never gotten this to work properly as I find that the rucksack 'springs' back to another shape. I've usually had blurred long exposures because of this. The thing with the bean bag is that they're filled with non compressable bits of plastic, so once it's placed, it keeps its position. I guess a sandbag might behave similarly.

How have any long exposures come out for you 3Pinner?
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  #15  
Old 08-09-2006, 05:21 PM
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paddln paddln is offline
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Thumbs up

I have the Campmor tripod, looks just like the Ultrapod. I have had this for several years and it has held up well in all types of weather.

The velcro strap is a plus, does a good job supporting both my older HP 315 digital camera at 11 or 12oz or so, and my newer camera that weighs a lot less.
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  #16  
Old 08-09-2006, 07:15 PM
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big_load big_load is offline
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I looked at the Ultrapod before my last trip. Although it weighs an ounce less than my Cannon tripod, it's much more bulky, so it doesn't fit nicely in the same pocked as the camera. I'm still mulling it over.
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  #17  
Old 08-09-2006, 07:48 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by big_load
I looked at the Ultrapod before my last trip. Although it weighs an ounce less than my Cannon tripod, it's much more bulky, so it doesn't fit nicely in the same pocked as the camera. I'm still mulling it over.

I'd keep the one that fits where you want it, if you're happy with it. An ounce less weight is nothing in comparison to something that is more functional for you.

Reality
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  #18  
Old 08-09-2006, 08:00 PM
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Trooper Trooper is offline
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Tripods

I like the Ultrapod for a smaller digital. I keep it strapped to my hiking stick so people can ask, "What's that blue thing?" All my packs are genetically predisposed to fall over at the least conveniant time so I don't put the camera on the pack. Instead of a beanbag maybe a baggie of gorp from the food bag?
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  #19  
Old 08-15-2006, 02:52 PM
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Paul_B Paul_B is offline
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tripods

Gorillapod all the way. Great little functional tool.
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  #20  
Old 01-01-2007, 12:49 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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I took out a Joby Gorillapod on a recent hike. I attached it to several trees, and it worked as intended. So far, I like the versatility of this mini-tripod.

However, it's significantly larger than my Ultrapod. Though I believe I can work around that.

Reality
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