Practical Backpacking™ Forums

Welcome to Practical Backpacking™ Forums (PBF).

You are currently viewing PBF as a guest which has limited access. By becoming a PBF member, you will have full access to view and participate in tens of thousands of informative discussions, to view links and attachments (photos), and will gain access to other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free! Click to Become a PBF Member! Be sure to also explore the Practical Backpacking Podcast.


Go Back   Practical Backpacking™ Forums > Practical Backpacking™ General Outdoors (Backpacking Related) > Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills
HOME FAQ PBF GUIDELINES BLOG PODCAST GALLERY STORE CALENDAR Mark Forums Read

Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills The Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills forum is for discussion (on-site content) that directly relates to ancient and/or primitive style bushcraft/wilderness skills (e.g. firecraft, foraging, natural material construction, modern/primitive tools, long-term wilderness survival,...).


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 08-30-2013, 06:38 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Blazerdog Blazerdog is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 22
I agree the Mora have plastic handles, partial tangs, and the sheath and
knife itself are not knife show prize winners. I just figured
we were going more for function and utility rather than aesthetics. I believe
bush knives are often designed for a range of uses. Thick full tang and blade
can take a lot of abuse. Batoning firewood, pounding with a reinforced butt etc. These knives are'nt cheap. But as a starter ... learning knife maintenance etc. Mora looks good.
All gear choices are a personal matter however. Guy has to like what he
packs. Thats it!
Peace
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 08-31-2013, 05:28 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Benwaller Benwaller is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Backpack: Camelbak RimRunner, Osprey Volt 60, Kelty Redwing 50
Sleeping Gear: Kelty LightYear Down 20 / ENO Doublenest Hammock
Shelter: Granite Gear White Lightnin' tarp
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sonoma County, CA
Posts: 285
Whatever brush knife should:

have a full tang,

have a handle that works in the "push" and in the "pull" modes, which means that the handle should be of a shape such that, whether the edge is pointing away from you or towards you, there is no top or bottom to the handle - ovoid is the shape we are looking for,

have short guards or rises that will prevent your hand from sliding onto the blade - think of these as blood-loss prevention features,

have a non-slip grip surface, but not textured to the point of eroding your skin during hard or long-session use,

have a spine of sufficient thickness to enable batoning,

be not hollow-ground,

be of sufficient length to be useful,

be of 1085 - 1095 or a similar steel so that you can sharpen it if necessary against a suitable stone, millions of tons of which can be mostly found strewn about in the woods. Cave men did not have an Uncle Henry's Carbide Miracle Sharpening System and you are, after all, entering into an experience that should, dare I say it, hone your primitive skills.

There are other requirements of course but I think them less important than those I have listed.

In any case buy what you like, always, and listen to no one but yourself.

And pack gloves and some bandages. I do and I've been at this a very long time.

As always,

Ben
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 09-01-2013, 12:57 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
GGervin GGervin is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Forums Moderator
Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
Sleeping Gear: REI ThermoPod +0 mummy, MH 3D +40 mummy
Shelter: SD Superflash, GoLite Hut 1
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: California
Posts: 436
I have a Condor Bushlore. I like it, and trust it as a good small, sturdy survival knife.

It's 1075 steel, not 1085 or 1095. But that's still good steel. Decent at edge keeping, not too hard to resharpen.

Aesthetically, it's very plain. You will either think it's faintly ugly, or you will love the plainness (I think its plainness is rather attractive).

You can't judge a knife by it's OEM sheath any more than you can judge a book by it's cover. But the heavy leather sheath the Bushlore comes with is really good. You will only replace it if you insist on Kydex (in which case you will be making your own - which is very feasible).

I think the Mora is a different knife. A little smaller, a little thinner spine, a little lighter in weight. If you want a smaller knife, I think the Mora is pretty hard to beat. If you want a little bigger knife with a little larger spine, the Bushlore is dirt cheap for its quality.

The one thing that will take you by surprise is it's grind. The Bushlore looks like a scandi grind, but it's mildly convex. That's a common feature of the Condors.
Reply With Quote
Please Click to Visit These Sites
  #14  
Old 09-01-2013, 08:55 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
Quote:
Originally Posted by GGervin
I have a Condor Bushlore. I like it, and trust it as a good small, sturdy survival knife.

It's 1075 steel, not 1085 or 1095. But that's still good steel. Decent at edge keeping, not too hard to resharpen.

Aesthetically, it's very plain. You will either think it's faintly ugly, or you will love the plainness (I think its plainness is rather attractive).

You can't judge a knife by it's OEM sheath any more than you can judge a book by it's cover. But the heavy leather sheath the Bushlore comes with is really good. You will only replace it if you insist on Kydex (in which case you will be making your own - which is very feasible).

I think the Mora is a different knife. A little smaller, a little thinner spine, a little lighter in weight. If you want a smaller knife, I think the Mora is pretty hard to beat. If you want a little bigger knife with a little larger spine, the Bushlore is dirt cheap for its quality.

The one thing that will take you by surprise is it's grind. The Bushlore looks like a scandi grind, but it's mildly convex. That's a common feature of the Condors.

the bushlore isn't all that far off from the knife that horace kephart designed a hundred and some years ago. about the same steel grade, same size roughly, etc. it's not a bad design at all. it's just extremely traditional. it's a knife that will get a lot of jobs done.

mora knives... have a very deep reputation. they've been around for ages. that said, i'm not a fan of some of the design choices involved in the mora knives. they're not BAD choices per se, but choices i don't agree with.

ben's got some really good points. full tangs are strong. carbon steels are easy to sharpen. non-slip grips are a CRITICAL must. i like handles that are both non-slip and with some finger ridging.

a first aid kit is a BIG one. carry one you can get to easy, and make sure you know the procedures for handling a big cut. practice them even. especially practice once or twice doing it with one hand, treating the other hand. not all of us have cut ourselves on our off-hand, but enough of us have, i think, to make that a good point.

carving is a lot of fun. if you like, i can point you to some fun knife-making resources that cover a little of making and fitting scales to a full-tang knife(and doing hidden tang and other such work).
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 09-01-2013, 10:35 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
GGervin GGervin is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Forums Moderator
Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
Sleeping Gear: REI ThermoPod +0 mummy, MH 3D +40 mummy
Shelter: SD Superflash, GoLite Hut 1
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: California
Posts: 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
the bushlore isn't all that far off from the knife that horace kephart designed a hundred and some years ago. about the same steel grade, same size roughly, etc. it's not a bad design at all. it's just extremely traditional. it's a knife that will get a lot of jobs done...

...make sure you know the procedures for handling a big cut. practice them even. especially practice once or twice doing it with one hand, treating the other hand. not all of us have cut ourselves on our off-hand, but enough of us have, i think, to make that a good point.
Real good advice about the first aid kit and cuts. Very relevant in a thread on cutting tools.

Interesting point about the Kephart design showing up in the Bushlore. I think the Condor marketing department knows what North Americans want in cutlery, so I'm sure it's not a coincidence.

I should mention another Condor. The Bushcraft. Kochanski's bushcraft book has line drawings of what he considers to be the "ideal" bushcraft knife. I think I recall he speaks highly of the Mora, and presumably the drawings are of an ideal Mora. But I seriously doubt it's a coincidence that the Bushcraft looks exactly like those line drawings, and it perfectly matches the verbal description of Kochanski's ideal. I bet that Condor would function as a great bushcrafting knife, too. It has the same heft and tang of the Bushlore, so it's a different knife from the Mora too. But it sure looks like a Kochanski bush knife. I almost bought one, but I do better with a drop point for point work, and the Bushlore's handle fits me just a little better. The Bushcraft is yet another cheap-for-the-quality option to consider.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 09-03-2013, 06:05 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Benwaller Benwaller is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Backpack: Camelbak RimRunner, Osprey Volt 60, Kelty Redwing 50
Sleeping Gear: Kelty LightYear Down 20 / ENO Doublenest Hammock
Shelter: Granite Gear White Lightnin' tarp
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sonoma County, CA
Posts: 285
The Condor offerings appear to be pretty much old school utilitarian and for that I do admire them. But to my mind 1/8" steel, 1075 at that, just isn't enough for a blade that may have to be pressed into service for wood processing.

I visited their site this morning and found that I do like many of the designs this company supplies. There are some fluffy, gee-whiz blades there of course (there has to be, always), but mostly it seems Condor makes yeah-that'll-work stuff.

I do think that 1/8" steel is just too thin for wood processing, so such blades do not meet any kind of "single knife" requirement. I've built a few Green River blades over the years, typically of similar 1/8" flat stock, and they just aren't stout enough to beat on.

In all other regards these Condor blades seem mostly adequate, at least from a design perspective. They are certainly affordable so I have ordered the Rodan, a 5 mm, 5-1/4" drop point (in my view a very practical blade for bushcraft chores other than wood processing; my current "favorite" is the KaBar Mark 1 Navy) - from Amazon. I do like the profile of this blade and besides I want to see just what kind of quality this company is supplying.

Well, that's my excuse anyway and I'm sticking to it.

,

Ben
Reply With Quote
Please Consider PBF Partners
The Paleo Recipe Book
  #17  
Old 09-03-2013, 09:24 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
EagleRiverDee EagleRiverDee is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Regular Member
Backpack: Granite Gear Vapor Trail
Sleeping Gear: BA Q-Core SL, WM Versalite
Shelter: Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Eagle River, Alaska
Posts: 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirstRWD
Thanks all for the suggestions of the a Mora. I've read many times that they're great for the money. I just have an aversion to those big plastic handles. And I don't like the sheaths, so I'd also want to make a decent sheath for it. Just not really the knives for me. I was actually even thinking that if I went with the Schrade that maybe making some wooden scales for it would be one of the first tasks on the list to develop my carving skills. Maybe I'll end up with the Condor and the Schrade after a few months.

That Pocket Pal X2 looks like it would just be a nice small addition to keep in my pack. I think I'll probably grab one of those. Thanks.

Not all Mora's have plastic handles. The Mora classics have wood handles. I have a #1 and #2/0. I agree the plastic sheaths stink but making a sheath is pretty easy. I made one for my 2/0 and found that a leather sheath for a filet knife that bit the dust fits my #1 pretty good.

Condor is a good brand, too, though so if you go that way you should be fine.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 09-03-2013, 10:34 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
richwads richwads is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Shelter: Tarp
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: California
Posts: 483
RE: Pocket Pal sharpener vs. skandi grind blades

The Moras and other Skandinavian type knives ("puukkos") have a grind called "skandi grind" (vs "hollow" or "flat" or "convex" grind) that is both strong and scary sharp, and works best for batonning vs the other grinds. Sharpening requires applying a stone or diamond hone on the exact same angle as the flats that form the sharp edge. That is, if you want it to stay that sharp. Some don't care and find the pocket pal's "secondary bevel" to be sharp enough. A "secondary bevel" is commonly seen on hollow or flat grinds and is familiar to most American knife users. If one sharpens his knives with a stone or diamond hone, he can make that bevel as acute as he wants and achieve the skandi level of sharpening on a flat grind or hollow grind. Using a pocket pal or similar type of sharpener creates a fixed angle edge pretty fast because it's a relatively "dull" edge compared to a skandi grind.

I made the mistake of sharpening a Brusletto blade by honing a secondary bevel on it 'cuz I didn't know any better and couldn't figure out why I couldn't get it as sharp as it once was. After reading Kochansky's book on Bushcraft and knife sharpening I spent a few hours taking the whole edge down to the skandi angle and learned what a really sharp knife is like.

Since then I've flattened down all the secondary bevels on all my knives, to the approximate skandi angle (I forget what that angle is, but just look at your Mora edge for an example), which is a bit of work, but I've gotten to appreciate sharp knives.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 09-03-2013, 12:20 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Benwaller Benwaller is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Backpack: Camelbak RimRunner, Osprey Volt 60, Kelty Redwing 50
Sleeping Gear: Kelty LightYear Down 20 / ENO Doublenest Hammock
Shelter: Granite Gear White Lightnin' tarp
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sonoma County, CA
Posts: 285
Yeah, it's pretty amazing what happens when you lay down the angle of a knife that was made to carry a secondary.

I've done that with a lot of knives, including believe it or not, a KaBar Marine 7". It was a good blade before but it's a great blade now.

But it sure takes a long time to make a scandi out of a secondary and there is no doubt. I use a Lansky rig, so slow and slower is about as fast as it gets. And I always have the feeling that I'm wasting the steel - but that feeling passes once the blade starts taking proper shape and a proper edge emerges.

I do like the positive feel I get when sharpening a scandi as there is no guesswork to it at all. A scandi is also somewhat weaker than a secondary of course so you have to be a little more careful how you use the blade; chipping the edge is always a concern.

,

Ben
Reply With Quote
Your Visit to These Sites Helps Support PBF
  #20  
Old 09-03-2013, 02:43 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
richwads richwads is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Shelter: Tarp
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: California
Posts: 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benwaller
I do like the positive feel I get when sharpening a scandi as there is no guesswork to it at all. A scandi is also somewhat weaker than a secondary of course so you have to be a little more careful how you use the blade; chipping the edge is always a concern.
Ben
Good point (no pun intended ). I usually remove nicks (usually from batoning) using a tiny secondary bevel, then later redo the whole skandi bevel. I like the special sound that wide bevel makes when you're in the sweet spot!
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Wenger Ranger Knife Ralph General Gear Discussion 2 07-24-2013 10:40 AM
MSR Alpine Kitchen Knife dsuursoo Backcountry Kitchen 1 09-29-2011 02:15 AM
KaBar Adventure Piggyback Knife Ralph Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills 0 10-31-2010 06:43 AM
HOW do you USE your knife when backpacking? AlanBaljeu General Gear Discussion 45 01-06-2010 08:02 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:28 PM.

Backpacking Forums


Powered by vBulletin Version 3.5.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2006-2017 Practical Backpacking™
Practical Backpacking is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacker is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Podcast is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Magazine is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™