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Gear Workshop The Gear Workshop forum is for the discussion of homemade backpacking gear, gear modifications, and repairs.


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  #1  
Old 08-24-2013, 12:22 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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ContainsImages IKEA Cutlery Caddy for DIY Wood Stove

Though not a unique idea, I thought it would be good to share the IKEA Ordning Cutlery Caddy wood stove concept/project here on PBF.


IKEA Cutlery Caddy & Snow Peak 600ml Mug (left) for Size Comparison

The caddy can be cut, on the side near the bottom, to create an opening for fuel (twigs) feed and cut at top to fashion a pot stand (though steel shelter pegs may also be used).

The caddy is stainless steel and weighs 4.6 ounces (before any cuts are made).


IKEA Cutlery Caddy (Bottom View)

There are some raised standoffs (bumps) on the bottom of the caddy.

When I get around to converting this caddy to a wood stove, I'll followup with photos and comments.

Reality
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  #2  
Old 08-24-2013, 11:10 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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i like how there's pre-made guide holes for cutting/installing pot-standoffs.

and an eight-dollar wood-stove is hard to beat.
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  #3  
Old 08-24-2013, 11:29 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
i like how there's pre-made guide holes for cutting/installing pot-standoffs.
Yes. As you know, but worth noting here anyway, which pot, mug, or even stainless bottle is being used will have much to do with how cutting/installing a stand (or whatever) is approached. Some bottles and mugs may simply require a couple shepherd's hook stakes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
and an eight-dollar wood-stove is hard to beat.
Some of the quart cans that I've seen people use are a little spendy. Certainly, using cans from canned goods (foods) costs less, but they are not stainless steel. So I agree, for some, this is a good deal.

Reality
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  #4  
Old 08-25-2013, 07:28 AM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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the quart-can stoves are slick, but the amount of work, oy. and it adds up fast, as you need to buy the inner can for the fire, the mesh for the bottom of that, the outer can, the stove-stand can...

and as you mention, it's not stainless. while they're efficient, how long are they really going to last?

really looking forward to seeing this one done. i've looked at those same cutlery baskets and thought 'that would make a nice woodstove'
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  #5  
Old 08-28-2013, 05:36 PM
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ContainsImages

OK I decided to put a little more time into this project, while it was on my mind.


IKEA Wood Stove (Snow Peak 600ml Mug)

The initial thinking was to accomplish something like what's seen in the above photo. In this mode, it's easy to use alcohol, Esbit, or wood (twigs).


IKEA Wood Stove (inverted for grill-top)

I decided to design it in such a way that it could also be inverted to form a cook/grill-top.

I got the fire going with some birch bark, pine sap, and kindling. I then put the stove over the fire. As it burns, more fuel may be easily fed through the ample opening (seen above).


IKEA Wood Stove (inverted with SP Mug)

It works great, but I don't have much time in with it - so it's a work in progress. The inverted method made a very sturdy cooking surface.

The weight is now at exactly 3 ounces. This is similar to a canteen stove design - though a canteen cannot nest in this stove . This design is best suited for backpacking pots and mugs - though one could certainly cook on it with a stainless canteen or bottle.

By the way, for those concerned about the ground below the stove, feel free to use whatever you'd like (foil, metal plate,...) to protect it. However, at best, it's just going to help with aesthetics (which can be remedied in various ways). The ground is still going to get extremely hot and torture and kill a bunch of helpless microbes and other small living things. Do the best you can and leave no trace.

Reality
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  #6  
Old 08-28-2013, 05:53 PM
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Perkolady Perkolady is offline
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Wow this is pretty neat, Reality!

Can you please post the dimensions?

Thanks!
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  #7  
Old 08-28-2013, 05:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perkolady
Can you please post the dimensions?
It's about 4 5/8" wide and 3 1/4" tall.

In one mode or another, it should accommodate every lightweight backpacking mug and pot on the market.

By the way, I used a Dremel tool to make the cuts - while wearing ear and eye protection (outside). I also used the Dremel to smooth the edges, to avoid cuts and snags.

Reality
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  #8  
Old 08-28-2013, 06:06 PM
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Perkolady Perkolady is offline
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Thanks for all the info, Reality! Very cool!
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  #9  
Old 08-28-2013, 06:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perkolady
Thanks for all the info, Reality! Very cool!
You're welcome. I'm glad you like it.

This stove can also be used to dig with (e.g. catholes), to collect berries, and even as a strainer - and I'm sure others here can think of more uses.

Reality
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  #10  
Old 08-29-2013, 09:07 AM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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that came out really slick. easy to make, sturdy, cheap. what's not to love.

was the material hard on the cut-off wheels?
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