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Hammocks The Hammocks forum is for the discussion of backpacking hammocks and related sleep systems.


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  #1  
Old 06-12-2013, 01:47 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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ContainsImages Carabiners for Hammock Suspension

Please share any carabiners (not clips, buckles, cord, knots, etc) that you use with your hammock suspension system.


Carabiners for Hammock Use

I've used the carabiners shown in the above photo.

Reality
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  #2  
Old 06-12-2013, 10:54 PM
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Grandpa Grandpa is offline
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Black Diamond Neutrino Carabiner: 1.26 oz.

Looks quite a bit like the Camp Nano.
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  #3  
Old 06-13-2013, 06:28 AM
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miahl miahl is offline
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I also use the Black Diamond Neutrino.
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  #4  
Old 06-13-2013, 12:59 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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I have some BD 'biners too. I haven't used them enough to comment.

The past few years I've been using the WB 'biners (pictured above). So far, there has not been any issues.

By the way, I've also wrapped some 'biners with (camo or dark) tape to tone them down. The CAMP 'biners are like beacons in comparison to my hammock and other components/accessories.

Reality
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  #5  
Old 06-21-2013, 08:27 PM
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PaxHammockus PaxHammockus is offline
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In the interest of safety, I'd personally be very reluctant to chance any carabiner that wasn't climbing rated. Inexpensive (i.e. $6 or $7 bucks each) climbing biners can be found at any sporting goods store that offers climbing gear. I weight's an issue the CAMP Nano 23 wiregate carabiner specs out at 20kN (more than 4000 pounds) strength at 23 grams each.

The tensile force on your hammock suspension varies considerably, based upon the angle/taughtness at which it is hung. The cord tension (i.e the tensile force on the suspension/rope/carabiner) is equal to the weight in the hammock, divided by 2 times the sine of the angle between the suspension and the horizontal from the point at which it's attached to the hammock.

It seems counterintuitive, but for a 200 lb. individual the tensile force on EACH side of the suspension -- IF the aforementioned angle is 30-degrees -- is 200 pounds (not 100, as one might think). What's more, if you reduce the angle to 5-degrees -- "nice and flat", one might think -- that tensile force becomes a stunning 1148 pounds on EACH side/rope/biner. Thats a static load. Add to that forces generated when one starts wigging/bouncing around getting comfortable...

A few extra grams of safety is surely worth avoiding the potentially dire consequences of a suspension failure. I cannot help but think that "Not For Climbing" is really "not for hammocks".
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  #6  
Old 06-21-2013, 09:04 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaxHammockus
In the interest of safety, I'd personally be very reluctant to chance any carabiner that wasn't climbing rated. Inexpensive (i.e. $6 or $7 bucks each) climbing biners can be found at any sporting goods store that offers climbing gear. I weight's an issue the CAMP Nano 23 wiregate carabiner specs out at 20kN (more than 4000 pounds) strength at 23 grams each.

The tensile force on your hammock suspension varies considerably, based upon the angle/taughtness at which it is hung. The cord tension (i.e the tensile force on the suspension/rope/carabiner) is equal to the weight in the hammock, divided by 2 times the sine of the angle between the suspension and the horizontal from the point at which it's attached to the hammock.

It seems counterintuitive, but for a 200 lb. individual the tensile force on EACH side of the suspension -- IF the aforementioned angle is 30-degrees -- is 200 pounds (not 100, as one might think). What's more, if you reduce the angle to 5-degrees -- "nice and flat", one might think -- that tensile force becomes a stunning 1148 pounds on EACH side/rope/biner. Thats a static load. Add to that forces generated when one starts wigging/bouncing around getting comfortable...

A few extra grams of safety is surely worth avoiding the potentially dire consequences of a suspension failure. I cannot help but think that "Not For Climbing" is really "not for hammocks".

aaand that's why i still use the beefy ones that came with my ENO. those bad boys are HEFTY.

and should i ever want to swap them out i have a set of really light cargo-rated clips i'll swap up to. those things could hold a car up.
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  #7  
Old 06-21-2013, 11:12 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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You bring up some good points. And...

Major Access Loading and Cross Loading (...) should both be considered.

As you know, there's also a big difference between climbing and hammocking. In some cases, someone could be seriously hurt if they fall from a hammock. However, if I had the strongest carabiners in the world on my hammock, I still wouldn't use the hammock fabric or webbing for climbing. The cord, webbing, thread, fabric, and other factors should be considered too -- but are sometimes overlooked on this topic.

It certainly pays to be safe, and the weight of something is often not the most important aspect, to be sure. Some of the ultralight stuff floating around is ignorance gone to seed. It's self-defeating. I'm all for lightweight gear, but not when it defeats appropriate function (...).

Thanks for the input and concern. I sure paid attention to such information years ago when doing rescue repelling and other similar practices in the military.

By the way, PaxHammockus, in keeping with this thread "Please share any carabiners (not clips, buckles, cord, knots, etc) that you use with your hammock suspension system."

Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
and should i ever want to swap them out i have a set of really light cargo-rated clips i'll swap up to. those things could hold a car up.
The ones I have, pictured above (center), I believe are the current 'biners' shipping with ENO hammocks.

By the way, I'm guessing the ones that you have are stamped with a warning to not use them for climbing.

Reality

Last edited by Reality : 06-22-2013 at 09:57 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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  #8  
Old 06-22-2013, 05:38 AM
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PaxHammockus PaxHammockus is offline
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(sorry... forgot to include...)
I use Rock Exotica RockO Auto-Lock biners (with Kammok Python tree straps)...

3 stage autolocking gate
Minor axis: 11 kN (2475lb)
Open gate & Inward against sleeve: 6 kN
Gate opening: .93” (23.2 mm)
Rated strength: 25 kN (≈ 5620 lbs.)
Weight: 80 grams.
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  #9  
Old 06-23-2013, 07:29 PM
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Benwaller Benwaller is offline
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Put me down as a user of the Camp Nano's. Plenty strong enough to prevent a 20" drop to the earth, which really does not rise to level of "danger" in the first place.

As for the "biner's" supplied by ENO, well...3/8" solid steel with a pot metal pin...though they look stout enough to hoist an engine block...they have no place in the woods.

Camp Nano's, good enough.

HYOH,

Ben
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  #10  
Old 06-23-2013, 08:37 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benwaller
Put me down as a user of the Camp Nano's. Plenty strong enough to prevent a 20" drop to the earth, which really does not rise to level of "danger" in the first place.
I like those Nanos too. I've used the stock WB 'biners a lot. I haven't had any trouble with them, but I'm likely to exclusively use the Nanos until something (if anything) changes my mind. I like the idea of them being used for other tasks, when needed.

An unexpected fall from several inches high could create trouble with the spine - especially if there's an issue that a fall like this makes the final breaking point. And I suspect some have their hammock hanging on trees on a hillside or perhaps over some rocks or bushes (read spear-like branches).

I'm sure you're like me and don't deploy your hammock over punji sticks or at nosebleed heights.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Benwaller
As for the "biner's" supplied by ENO, well...3/8" solid steel with a pot metal pin...though they look stout enough to hoist an engine block...they have no place in the woods.

I've used them in my yard and don't like the feel of them in comparison to my others - and that's likely for good reason. If they don't feel right in my hand, my whole body is not likely to feel comfortable relying on them.

I will say, however, that I've had a considerable amount of weight on them for a few days at a time. But being that I prefer having a better option around, for other potential uses, these will not be in my regular hammock kit.

Reality
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