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Wilderness Photography The Wilderness Photography forum is for the discussion of photography (videography) gear, experience, and technique as it directly relates to wilderness photography. PBF members may also post self-owned photos that have been uploaded to the PB Gallery or as post attachments. Offsite links and offsite photos are prohibited. Please see ("sticky") instructional post located at top of threads.


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  #1  
Old 01-11-2012, 03:23 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Camera Roundup

What camera(s) do you use on your wilderness backpacking trips?

For compact camera, I'm currently using a Canon PowerShot SX230HS (which sports a 12.1 MP CMOS and DIGIC 4 image processor, full 1080p HD video, and 14x optical zoom with optical image stabilizer).

Reality
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  #2  
Old 01-11-2012, 04:18 PM
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big_load big_load is offline
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I still use a Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ3, which offered a great balance of weight and performance when it was new. I'll probably upgrade someday, but it's still healthy and I have a bunch of spare batteries. My wife has one, too. The latest version in that line (the TZ10) is tempting.
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  #3  
Old 01-11-2012, 05:11 PM
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Bushwalker Bushwalker is offline
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I have an Olympus "mu" weatherproof pocket camera at the moment...

I have been considering buying a Nikon D9 body and a Tamron lens, for those trips where weight isn't too critical, for a bit more flexibilty and a wider range of possibilities..

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  #4  
Old 01-11-2012, 08:48 PM
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Grandpa Grandpa is offline
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I wore out a couple versions of Canon Digital Elph cameras. What I liked about them is they had an optical viewfinder (although I didn't use that feature as much as I thought I would), they are small and light, have image stabilization, shoot high quality photos, and get about 400 shots on a battery.

A little over a year ago, on the way to Big Bend National Park, I stopped at a large box retailer and bought a Sony DSC-H55, along with 16 GB card for under $200.00. It's a bit larger than the Digital Elph but still fits in my palm or a shirt pocket. It has a 3" screen (nice for these old eyes) and 10X optical zoom rather than the 4X or less on the Canon Elphs. It takes better video than my Elphs did and the video can be zoomed while shooting. It also has a panorama mode, which I mainly use for trick shots (I get my grandson to pose on the left side, run behind me and pose on the right and show up in the picture twice). It has 14.1 megapixel resolution and weighs 7.4 oz. One battery charge will last several hundred shots and spare batteries are easily available online. As small and light as the camera is, I keep it on my belt at all times--as a grandpa, I never know when I'll just have to take another grandkid picture. My only gripe about the Sony is that the screen washes out in bright light.

A couple weeks ago, my grandson and I backpacked to South Rim in the Chisos Mountains in Big Bend. From the top of a pass almost 3 miles distant and about 2000' above them, zooming in at 10x and hand holding the camera, the photos showed my wife and granddaughter in the campground in the Chisos Mountains Basin. The image stabilization on the Sony works quite well.

These things are a long way from the first camera I packed in those mountains 45 years ago. When I was fourteen, I was hauling a Graphlex Speed Graphic, an old time bellows camera that took cut and roll film and required a separate light meter. That camera probably tipped the scales at half what my entire pack does now. I took pictures of Boot Rock with the Speed Graphic in 1966 and duplicated them with the Sony a couple weeks ago. The rock hasn't changed noticeably in 45 years but Grandpa and what he hangs around his neck surely has.
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  #5  
Old 02-19-2012, 05:31 PM
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Benwaller Benwaller is offline
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Sometimes I pack my trusty old Canon A570 but more often than not I am hauling my D40 with a couple of lenses and the standard filters. Not lightweight by any means, just under 3 pounds, but nowadays I find myself more and more in the weeds to take pictures (day hikes and over-nighters are what I mainly do) which is not really backpacking at all though backpacking is involved, the how of getting to where the pictures are.

But a smaller, equally capable camera would be nice for the longer trips. Though the A570 is a decent tool it is really slow and I've lost some great shots of raptors and such because it just couldn't cycle fast enough.

Talked myself into a new camera. Cool. That was easy.

Initiate search...

Ben
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  #6  
Old 02-23-2012, 03:11 PM
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Rambo Rambo is offline
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I have been carrying a Nikon Coolpix 5700. Nice lens but always just a little frustrating with with anything other than slow moving or stationary objects. I will be carrying a Nikon D7000 with the 18-105mm lens this year. Much nicer and well worth the additional 12oz. I think.
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  #7  
Old 02-24-2012, 02:59 AM
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GGervin GGervin is offline
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For pure snapshot use, I carry a Kodak Z8612 IS, which is my only digital. I find it a little obtuse to control, and the enlargement ability is limited, so it's far from my favorite.

If I'm "loaded" for bear or other animals, I carry a Minolta X700 with a long lens (400 f5.6 or 300 f2.8) and shoulder stock. I'd consider a digital SLR replacement, but don't want to replace the good Minolta-compatible glass I already have. So as long as I can get film and the Minoltas still work, that's the choice for animals.

My favorite landscape rig is a Galvin 2x3 view camera. Slow and deliberate (which I like), and hardly ultrallight (which I don't like). But it is packable, which is why I have it in the first place.

The Kodak weighs about 1 lb. with case and is great for exploratory trips and experimental snapshots. On the other hand, the Galvin rig weighs anywhere from 10 to 20 lbs. depending on lens and support choices.
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  #8  
Old 06-28-2012, 12:47 AM
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EricX EricX is offline
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I love that we got some classic view cameras going in this forum!

I use a Canon 5D Mark II with a couple of favorite lenses, the 24-105 f/4 L and the 70-200 f/4 L (great as a lightweight landscape lens). I may need to sell the 70-200 f/4 and replace with a f/2.8 soon for some photojournalism that I shoot, but I hope not since the weight I save is really nice! Occasionally I'll break out a 35 f/1.4, but I usually save it for the city and not the backcountry out of weight considerations.

I also have a Canon 550D with the Sigma 10-20 f/3.5-5.6 EX as backup. I usually bring it along on more photography oriented travel, such as roadtrips, and less so for backpacking again for the weight considerations.
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  #9  
Old 09-14-2013, 11:37 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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A while back, I upgraded my compact camera to the Canon Powershot SX280 HS. It features 12.1 megapixel CMOS, DIGIC 6 image processor, WiFi, ISO 6400, 20x image-stabilized zoom, 25mm wide-angle lens, and 1080p Full-HD video.

Reality
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  #10  
Old 09-14-2013, 11:50 PM
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Wildfield Wildfield is offline
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I've been using a Nikon Coolpix P7000. While it is a little heavy, it's a very nice and reliable camera. It is a 10.1 megapixel camera with a Nikkor 7.1x Zoom lens - 6 mm-42.6 mm (28-200) - F/2.8-5.6. It weighs 12.7 ounces; add 4.75 ounces for the carrying case, which slides on to my hip belt. Hanging off of my hip belt, the weight of the camera and case is not noticeable.






Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality
A while back, I upgraded my compact camera to the Canon Powershot SX280 HS. It features 12.1 megapixel CMOS, DIGIC 6 image processor, WiFi, ISO 6400, 20x image-stabilized zoom, 25mm wide-angle lens, and 1080p Full-HD video.

Reality

Reality,

That is a very nice camera. Fairly lightweight and the optical zoom is pretty incredible - 25mm to 500mm with image stabilization. Weight is respectable also at 7.4 ounces.

WF

Last edited by Wildfield : 09-15-2013 at 12:33 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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