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Wilderness Photography The Wilderness Photography forum is for the discussion of photography (videography) gear, experience, and technique as it directly relates to wilderness photography. PBF members may also post self-owned photos that have been uploaded to the PB Gallery or as post attachments. Offsite links and offsite photos are prohibited. Please see ("sticky") instructional post located at top of threads.


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  #11  
Old 01-09-2012, 06:55 AM
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Haclil Haclil is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Jerusalem, Israel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GGervin
A quick word of caution to SLR users, film or digital: be very careful before trying to clean the flip-up mirror that lets you look through the lens - in the field or at home. Most such mirrors do not have any protective coatings, and will be damaged by even light brush strokes. Dirt on that mirror won't affect the photo...

This is of course excellent advice. However, if your mirror is desperately dirty, there are ways to clean a front-surface mirror.

It takes a combination of the right tools, a delicate touch, and enough confidence to tackle the job; only then.

This issue is sort of analagous to that of going into your computer registry. So I can't say I recommend you try what follows, it's your decision.

I cleaned my OM4Ti's "desperately dirty" mirror with a polymer optics cleaner. It's called Opticlean and I think there may be other brands of this type of cleaner. I've read of another cleaner for front-surface mirrors but have no experience with it. It's called Eclipse lens cleaner.

There are lens-cleaning brushes available almost everywhere outdoors: bird feathers! Best are small ones, "sparrow sized" and, for delicate jobs, downy ones from young fledglings.

You can also pull a useful feather right out of a down jacket.

Last edited by Haclil : 01-09-2012 at 07:03 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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  #12  
Old 01-10-2012, 03:42 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GGervin
For lens cleaning, I carry a retractable make-up brush and a lens pen. The retractable feature is important in keeping the bristles free of oil or dirt between uses. Usually just the make-up brush does the job fine. I think I've used the lens pen in the field only once or twice.
Which model of retractable makeup brush do you use?

How do you remove water spots from your lenses, in the field?

Quote:
Originally Posted by GGervin
I remember setting a camera up in the mist from a large waterfall. I protected the camera and lens body, but the glass had to be cleared of mist several times in the 10 minutes it took me to shoot. I let the gear dry thoroughly and I got no fungus or other damage.

I have some commercial rain covers (e.g. cheap OpTech Rainsleeve). But I've made some many years ago out of extremely thin and light produce bags and biker bands (what I called them as a kid but aka, in recent years, as ranger bands).

I do my best to avoid using a bag/cover, and simply dry the equipment before stowing. I dry it before I place it back in a case, because I don't want to transfer any moisture... [Some overlook the moisture (and potential for subsequent/consequential problems) transferred into a camera case/bag.]

Reality
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  #13  
Old 01-14-2012, 11:31 PM
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GGervin GGervin is offline
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The make-up brush is a covered, retractable lip brush. I have no idea what brand, the name wore off long ago.





What I like about the lip brush is the fact it's covered as well as retractable, so no dust or oil can get into the bristles at all while it's stored. The lens pen's brush retracts, but it's not covered and the bristle tips can still get dirty or oily. I personally find the small brush gets specks of dirt off the lens easier than a bigger one.

What I like about the lens pen is the "foot", which is what I'd use to remove dried water spots. (I'd use something of soft cotton to blot away actual water drops.)

Your comment about letting moisture transfer into the camera bag is a good one. I've mentioned in other posts that I keep my camera case inside a lightweight dry bag, but that's to keep dirt and water out. Once the gear or the case itself has gotten damp, the dry bag will keep the moisture in, too. That's one time it would pay to keep the dry bag unrolled and open - at least until everything is dry again.
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  #14  
Old 06-28-2012, 12:49 AM
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EricX EricX is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2012
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I always stash some microfiber cloth new in the packet in my backpack's pockets, as well as a lenspen and rocket air blower.

Worse situation I've ever had was shooting the Big Sur coastline, literally being hit again and again by the waves. I resorted to simply wiping my ND filter with my cotton shirt, since the microfiber cloth wouldn't absorb water. I had to do this every minute or so, despite trying to cover the lens when the waves hit. I left with myself and my camera thoroughly soaked, which I cleaned with a simple cloth and lenspen later.
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  #15  
Old 07-01-2012, 04:13 PM
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cudakid69 cudakid69 is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: 44*29'06"N73*11'34"W
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garethw
I would suggest that all lenses are fitted with UV filters to help protect from stratches. These can just be wiped with the said cloth and if they do get scratched, simply replaced. Gareth

This is excelent advice. I've even had a UV filter save one of my lenses. I wasn't hiking for pleasure, but I was out doing a geophysical survey in a pretty remote area (we had to hike our equipment in about 5 miles) and I slipped while coming down a steep, wet, abondoned bedrock river channel. After slipping, I landed on the part of my pack where I had stowed my DSLR, and one of my lenses landed between me and the rock. After checking my gear, I found that the UV filter had been shattered, but the lense was fine.

Other than this, I just carry a cleaning cloth.
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  #16  
Old 07-06-2012, 12:31 PM
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Arizona Arizona is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2007
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My DSLR goes with me on very backpacking trip, 25 nights a year total at this point and it goes on every day hike on top of the backpacking.

I have never cleaned it in the field. Some dust on the front element of the lens will not affect the outcome of the image as long as you don't have direct sunlight hitting the element. I do keep the lens cap on when not shooting and keep the camera in a protective bag on my chest. I don't believe in putting a 20 dollar piece of UV glass on a 600 dollar lens but that is just personal preference. I'm just careful. I don't get mine wet either.

When I get home I take my hand blower and clean off the dust, clean the sensor and at times clean the lens with ROR and Pec pads but only when necessary.
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  #17  
Old 07-15-2012, 10:49 PM
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GGervin GGervin is offline
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Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
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Location: California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricX
I always stash some microfiber cloth new in the packet in my backpack's pockets, as well as a lenspen and rocket air blower.

Worse situation I've ever had was shooting the Big Sur coastline, literally being hit again and again by the waves. I resorted to simply wiping my ND filter with my cotton shirt, since the microfiber cloth wouldn't absorb water. I had to do this every minute or so, despite trying to cover the lens when the waves hit. I left with myself and my camera thoroughly soaked, which I cleaned with a simple cloth and lenspen later.
I do carry microfiber cloths, too. I forgot to mention them because they are in the form of sunglass carrying bags so I get double duty out of them and they aren't in the camera bag.
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