Practical Backpacking™ Forums

Welcome to Practical Backpacking™ Forums (PBF).

You are currently viewing PBF as a guest which has limited access. By becoming a PBF member, you will have full access to view and participate in tens of thousands of informative discussions, to view links and attachments (photos), and will gain access to other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free! Click to Become a PBF Member! Be sure to also explore the Practical Backpacking Podcast.


Go Back   Practical Backpacking™ Forums > Practical Backpacking™ General Outdoors (Backpacking Related) > Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills
HOME FAQ PBF GUIDELINES BLOG PODCAST GALLERY STORE CALENDAR Mark Forums Read

Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills The Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills forum is for discussion (on-site content) that directly relates to ancient and/or primitive style bushcraft/wilderness skills (e.g. firecraft, foraging, natural material construction, modern/primitive tools, long-term wilderness survival,...).


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-15-2011, 09:37 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Reality Reality is offline
PBF Administrator & PB Podcast Host
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Oregon
Posts: 4,954
Fire Kit

What do you carry in your bushcraft firecraft kit (e.g. flint/steel, sap/pitch, birch bark,...)?

Reality
Reply With Quote
Please Consider PBF Sponsors
  #2  
Old 10-18-2011, 01:02 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
garethw garethw is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 20
Hi there
I carry a few bits and pieces to make things easy.. while its good to know, bow drills, hand drills etc, or use an old fashioned flint and steel, they are far from easy or quick techniques. When you just want to get your fire going IMHO it needs to be as quick and easy as possible.

So my fire kit, contains:
  1. A lighter
  2. A Firesteel (useful if lighter is wet or out of gas)
  3. Cottonwool balls soaked in vaseline
  4. Birchbark
With this kit I can get a fire going quickly and easily 90% of the time. I also keep a small Bahco saw in my pack to cut up fire wood.

cheers
Gareth
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-18-2011, 04:07 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Ralph Ralph is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Valued Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 503
I carry a fire kit packed into a small, center-zipped sil-nylon bag. Since I use bags of the same size and shape for a variety of kit the fire kit is marked by using blaze orange material for the bag or by using blaze orange cord for the zipper pull.

The kit contains:
- a lighter (I prefer the Djeep butane but carry the Zippo hunter model - with a lanyard attached - in the truck kit along with a can of lighter fluid and spare flints. The Zippo is windproof, highly reliable and very durable.)

- a firesteel (The Aurora is waterproof and has a flint containing magnesium for large, long-lasting sparks. The modern flint will dissolve in sea water so if you are going to be near the sea, use a flint with an O-ring seal. The Aurora includes a scraper, but I can't get it to work so I carry a Corona carbide sharpener for the purpose, cut down to the same length as the Aurora case. I am seriously considering getting the Exotac flint kit as a more compact version I can carry on my neck chain. I carry a Sparklite kit in the survival gear. I have the original version with brass body and replaceable flint. The Sparklite is a very compact kit that can be used one-handed.)

- tinder (I prefer the Tinder-Quik used in the Sparklite kit. These are very compact, dry tinders that easily catch a spark when pulled apart and fluffed up. Fine steel wool or cotton ball-Vaseline are also effective.

- kindling (either a few fatwood sticks or Coughlins fire sticks - wax soaked Celotex).

-'inspirator" (18" rubber tubing with a brass tube tip used to precisely blow on the fire - much better than flapping your hat or getting down in the dirt).

I also carry a matchsafe filled with waterproofed (painted with clear nail polish) strike-anywhere matches. I've carried a Marble's match safe for more than 50 years but also use the K&M safe in the survival kits.

Other fire-related kit include a small dry bag for cedar twigs, birch bark and pinecones gathered en-route, a Gerber saw - or Sawvivor saw in the winter, a knife suitable for baton-splitting wood and/or a GB mini hatchet or an old LL Bean modified Hudson Bay axe.
Reply With Quote
Please Consider PBF Sponsors
  #4  
Old 10-23-2011, 04:47 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
my kit is actually duplicated to minor degrees several times for safety's sake.

but the general gist of it is:

lighter(bic. zippo just won't cut it for any real emergency. the bic will continue lighting long after the zippo dries out.).

some sort of fire-steel. either flint/steel, my swissarmy scout, or one of the magnesium bar/spark-rod combos.

tinder - this takes many forms. i've got the 'traditional' vaseline impregnated cotton, with a twist: it's packed into small envelopes(the sort of thing you'd put a receipt in). the paper picks up a bit of vaseline and becomes both waterproof and very flammable. a spark or two and the packet is burning nicely. these are usually boosted with a generous helping of magnesium filings/shavings to bump the heat output of the fire.

i also carry, anachronistic as it may seem, char-cloth in a waterproof container. i can carry hundreds of swatches around for just an ounce or two of weight penalty. this stuff has never not worked, as well. only downside is, the heat output might not be there in wet conditions, which is where the packets from above come in.

matches. one waterproof tube of them. if i feel i'll need more i cut them in half and pack two layers in.


a knife. it's just too dang useful to have something sharp to shave tinder off, cut dry grass with, or any one of a lot of other uses.

i've also been known to carry around other tools from time to time depending on the weather. a tube of fire-starter goo goes a long dang way when it's wet out/cold out. thermite is overkill in almost any situation but a handful i can think of, but for those rare circumstances where it's a good thing, it's a VERY good thing. not too difficult to make at home, the trick is coming up with a reliable lighting method in the field, when you're soaked to the bone, in the middle of a blizzard, and trying to light wood that is, in fact, frozen. cannon fuse leading to a blister of magnesium powder mixed with wax works alright.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-24-2011, 06:57 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Ralph Ralph is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Valued Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 503
Another emergency starter I will carry in the winter is based on the bag firestarters I found in the local dollar store. These are paper packets containing waxed sawdust. Using a small paper bag I put one of the packets, a small amount of dry cedar twiglets, a few pieces of split cedar shingle or fatwood. On the outside of the bag I tape a couple of waterproofed strike-anywhere matches and either some sandpaper or the strike pad cut from the matchbox. The whole thing is carried in a small drybag or a ziplock freezer bag and carried in the jacket pocket or in some other easily accessable place.

In a winter emergency (going through the ice, being injured etc.) when you absolutely have to have a fire right now just gather some sticks of firewood and light the bag. You don't even have to remove the matches. Depending upon the amount of kindling included this bag will burn hotly of several minutes and light most small sticks, even if they are wet or frozen and not laid in too carefully.

Read Jack London's "To Light a Fire" then make one of these up for yourself.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-26-2011, 12:19 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Reality Reality is offline
PBF Administrator & PB Podcast Host
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Oregon
Posts: 4,954
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
my kit is actually duplicated to minor degrees several times for safety's sake.
I do this with a fire kit too. I always have more than one firestarter.

I'm planning to put another one together soon, and plan to post a photo or two.

Reality
Reply With Quote
Please Consider PBF Sponsors
Aquaponics 4 You
  #7  
Old 10-28-2011, 05:32 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
GWyble GWyble is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Backpack: Mariposa Plus / REI Flash 65
Sleeping Gear: Eureka Silver City / Lafuma WnL 600
Shelter: Tarptent Squall 2 / Appy Trails Mark V
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: St Charles, MO
Posts: 209
My small emergency kit has matches, a magnifying lens and flint and steel along with some small fire starter tabs.

My main fire starter kit is a water proof tube designed to carry about 5 cigarettes and a small refillable butane lighter. In place of the cigarettes I put in cut up fire starter blocks. The tube has a lanyard that I tie to my pack and then slip inside a pocket. The tube was a promotional item for Marlboro as I recall.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-29-2011, 04:31 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
garethw garethw is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by GWyble
My small emergency kit has matches, a magnifying lens and flint and steel along with some small fire starter tabs........
......In place of the cigarettes I put in cut up fire starter blocks. .

Personally I've never found fire starter blocks to be very good, especially if its windy. Cotton wool balls and vaseline ignite instantly in any weather.

A military mate of mine, said he used to carry tampons as a fire starter. Small easy to carry and make a fairely big ball of cotton when you break one open. Can be used with or without vaseline and it ignites well with either a lighter or a firesteel.

cheers
Gareth
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-29-2011, 04:05 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
richwads richwads is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Shelter: Tarp
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: California
Posts: 483
I don't have a fire "kit" per se. Strike anywhere matches are in a waterproof case in my emergency ditty bag, and a disposable lighter is in my first aid kit. There is also a disposable lighter in my pot kit, as well as some book matches in a small ziploc bag.

I used to carry fire ribbon. Once when I did a flint and steel trip I carried charcloth, but gathered tinder as I hiked.

I don't mind having to find dry tinder in rainy weather, or go without a fire if I have to. The fire ribbon was a novelty and I used it a couple times, but ended up rather wanting to do it with found tinder after that and after a few years of carrying it, removed it from my pack.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-30-2011, 12:48 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Reality Reality is offline
PBF Administrator & PB Podcast Host
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Oregon
Posts: 4,954
Quote:
Originally Posted by richwads
I don't mind having to find dry tinder in rainy weather, or go without a fire if I have to.
I tend to agree... When I ponder my feelings on this matter, they almost seem like a contradiction. I'll let you decide - paradoxical or practical(?)

I don't like being dependent upon tinder that cannot be found in the wild (such as petroleum-impregnated cotton balls). However, on the other hand, I am very big on being prepared.

Therefore, I generally carry some "tinder" with me - natural or otherwise. However, it's rarely used because I carefully gather it while on my hike or in camp. [Conversely, I'm quite proficient in producing a primitive friction fire but mostly use a ferrocerium rod or lighter.]

I also gather tinder in the pouring rain (but it's nice to know I carry backup).

By the way, my understanding of "kit" (FWIW) doesn't necessitate that it is all in one place/container. And I always have fire kit on my person.

Reality
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need Advice for Minimalist Kit dragonrider Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills 60 05-30-2013 12:52 PM
Building a Fire when Restricted SSDD The Trailhead - General Backpacking Discussion 64 01-31-2012 08:08 AM
3 Kinds of Fire Starter (firestarter) yippikiyo Backpacker's Health & Safety 13 09-03-2011 08:29 PM
Camp Fire Reality The Trailhead - General Backpacking Discussion 79 04-16-2011 09:41 AM
Using NeoAir with Chair Kit (Big Agnes Cyclone SL) cpw General Gear Discussion 10 08-18-2009 05:17 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:48 PM.

Backpacking Forums


Powered by vBulletin Version 3.5.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2006-2017 Practical Backpacking™
Practical Backpacking is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacker is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Podcast is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Magazine is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™