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Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills The Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills forum is for discussion (on-site content) that directly relates to ancient and/or primitive style bushcraft/wilderness skills (e.g. firecraft, foraging, natural material construction, modern/primitive tools, long-term wilderness survival,...).


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  #1  
Old 10-12-2011, 11:49 AM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Emergency / Supplemental Methods of Staying Warm

This thread is for the discussion of providing/improvising supplemental warmth while camping or on the go.

Please share any methods you've used and how they've worked for you - providing any helpful details you recall (e.g. temp, wind speed, precip,...).

Here are some examples of supplemental heating/insulation:
  • Heated water container (canteen, bottle) placed under (or in foot area of) sleeping bag/quilt/bedroll
  • Lit candle (wax, oil/fat) under shelter/emergency blanket
  • Heated rocks
  • Campfire reflector
  • Sleeping on top of buried coal bed
  • Wilderness debris as insulation (grass, leaves,...)
Thank you for your participation.

Reality
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  #2  
Old 10-13-2011, 11:08 PM
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Wayback Wayback is offline
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Wife. In same bag(s) or quilt with me. Never fails.
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  #3  
Old 10-14-2011, 07:08 AM
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SSDD SSDD is offline
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Wayback's way to stay warm would work

Years ago I was on a 4 day survival training trip and I had to make a "Big" pile of pine needles to cover my dog (Akita) and I and I got a little cold but not bad. Temps dipped to about 30-34 deg no precip and about a 8-12 mph wind.
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  #4  
Old 10-27-2011, 08:30 PM
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Ralph Ralph is offline
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Any loose material - leaves, crumpled newspaper, even stacked conifer branches can provide extra insulation. Using one of the reflective emergency bivies can keep debris from getting into your clothing.

Pinning a reflective sheet to your poncho lean-to dramatically increases the warmth from an open fire.

Any candle lantern acts like a radiator in addition to providing light and shielding the candle flame. I recall many times I would read for awhile, half out of the sleeping bag in frosty weather in a small tent heated by the lantern. In an emergency sitting up against a tree wrapped in a blanket (wool or reflective) or poncho with a small candle lantern between your legs can be surpriisingly comfortable. I've even slept that way though, to be honest, I was really stiff in the morning until I started moving around.
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  #5  
Old 12-02-2011, 08:47 PM
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Hanr3 Hanr3 is offline
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This is one of those areas where just about any wind break does wonders.
Simple things like putting your back to the wind to more elaborate shelters work wonders.
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  #6  
Old 12-04-2011, 07:06 AM
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Perkolady Perkolady is offline
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Once when I had day hiked into a remote trout pond in the White Mtns. of NH, although the temps were in the mid 60's, a very fast and freaky storm front moved in. Temperatures dropped drastically, and it started to sleet. Although I had a rain jacket with me, I didn't have any insulation other than what I was wearing already. The rain jacket wasn't enough and I was quickly feeling the threat of hypothermia. Thankfully, I had a trash bag with me! I configured a shirt-type vapor barrier and was a lot warmer after adding that under the rest of my clothing

I never hike without a trash bag. I have some in my vehicle, my car camping supplies, and I even carry one in my purse.
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Old 12-04-2011, 04:32 PM
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tonto tonto is offline
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Cheap Trick

I discovered this little trick while on a Boy Scout Survival camp out in November a few years back.
The boys had finished building their debris shelters for the required one night out in an emergency shelter when an unexpected sleeting rain set in around sundown.
I made my rounds to see that the boys where OK for the night ahead.
I soon found that my running shoes and socks where wet through and my feet where getting quite cold.
Not wanting to use my one extra pair of dry socks (which I always save for sleeping in) I remembered having a couple of plastic grocery bags in my truck.
Out of desperation I went to the truck & fetched them.
Removing my wet shoes & socks I placed a bag over each naked foot and wrapped the bag top around each ankle.
I then wrung the socks out and put them on over the sacks before putting my shoes back on.
It didn't take long for my feet to feel warm and comfy.
I've used the same cheap trick several times since.
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  #8  
Old 08-23-2012, 10:42 AM
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Debkirk Debkirk is offline
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I am a little slow on the uptake, but I thought Under Armour, The North Face, and such would take care of me. With a cold gear skin tight shirt, a shirt, a mid layer, and a shell worked great, once I figured the air around my skin needed some space to heat up. What did I find ? Old crumpled newspapers. Boy, my Daddy would be shaking his head if he knew.
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  #9  
Old 08-23-2012, 06:33 PM
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GWyble GWyble is offline
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I am a fan of trash bags also. On cold nights I stretch the rating of my sleeping bag by slipping a trash bag over the lower portion of my sleeping bag and pull it up to about my knees. Condensation doesn't seem to be a problem and it add considerable warmth. This can also keep your bag dryer during a rain storm when using a tarp or poncho shelter.

YMMV
Glenn
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  #10  
Old 08-24-2012, 01:17 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Debkirk
What did I find ? Old crumpled newspapers. Boy, my Daddy would be shaking his head if he knew.

hey, if it works for hobos...

one of my favorite methods is fluffy insulation of one kind or another. if i have plenty of extra clothing, throwing that in the bag makes for slightly uncomfortable but reasonably cozy extra insulation.

eating can really help, extra fuel to warm the body and all that. winter trips are good time to be taking extra snack-foods and go to ground with them.

i also carry some of those handwarmers to use. change them out once a year, they tend to lose some of their oomph if stored too long.
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