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Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills The Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills forum is for discussion (on-site content) that directly relates to ancient and/or primitive style bushcraft/wilderness skills (e.g. firecraft, foraging, natural material construction, modern/primitive tools, long-term wilderness survival,...).


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  #1  
Old 06-07-2011, 10:14 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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ContainsImages Bow Saws

For those who use a bow type saw (non-wire/chain, non-folder), please share the model that you use and how it has worked for your wood processing tasks.

Reality
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  #2  
Old 06-10-2011, 08:06 PM
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Saberman Saberman is offline
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Sawvivor 18" Sweet..........
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  #3  
Old 06-10-2011, 08:20 PM
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Ralph Ralph is offline
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I use the smaller SawVivor. Years ago I came upon a great deal in a dollar store - genuine Swedish bow saw (bidiectional) blades in the right size for 75 cents each and bought 6 of them. I still have 4. IMO the Bushman blades are the way to go
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  #4  
Old 06-11-2011, 07:09 PM
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watchman watchman is offline
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I pack a Sawvivor too. Weighs next to nothing but have so much cutting power.
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  #5  
Old 06-14-2011, 05:04 AM
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Tipiwalter Tipiwalter is offline
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In the old days I carried the usual cheap 21 inch bowsaw and lashed it with the blade guard on to the outside of my pack. This baby performed all tasks well and extra blades were cheap when one of them rusted. I built many sweatlodges with this old trusty bowsaw.

Now I've gotten away from the bowsaw and instead use either a Felco 611 saw or the folding Corona. Nowadays I don't build fires or sweatlodges and do not need to hump any kind of saw unless I'm on a backpacking trip and need to spend a couple days doing serious trailwork, so I cache a Corona saw and pruners wrapped in plastic somewhere in the area I am visiting.
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  #6  
Old 06-14-2011, 07:50 AM
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beekeeper beekeeper is offline
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I use a sven saw. It works well enough. Made a cordura sheath/stuff sack for it when it is in the stowed position.
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  #7  
Old 06-30-2011, 04:10 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Here's my newly-acquired Sawvivor 18" Saw.



The 18" model weighs in at 9.15 oz on my calibrated scale. I prefer the 18" model (over the 15") at a very slight weight increase of less than an ounce.

Reality

P.S. I'll post about my Bob's Quick Buck Saw sometime in the future.
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  #8  
Old 07-01-2011, 05:40 PM
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Saberman Saberman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality
Here's my newly-acquired Sawvivor 18" Saw.

That's the one I have and it works like a charm. Make sure you get some extra blades, they slide into the handle weigh nothing and are good to have just in case.
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  #9  
Old 10-09-2012, 11:36 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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I've used my Sawvivor saw (shown in post #7 above) several times and I am very happy with it. It really goes through the wood with ease.

Saberman, your spare blade tip is good advice.

Reality
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  #10  
Old 10-13-2012, 12:47 PM
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Ralph Ralph is offline
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I would have bought the 18" SawVivor if it had been available when I got the 15". I have used but never liked the triangular or tear-drop saws. If you are working on wood of substantial size you end up nibbling the wood. A 24" saw is better if you are working up a lot of wood - you can use the full motion of your arm.

Frame saws, IMO, are better than open jacksaws, the blade is held under tension and won't buckle or bind. I do have a Gerber saw with the Japanese-style teeth for times when I am not planning on needing a lot of wood (summer).

I like to have a small saw on a SAK or multi-tool. This is used for making notches and right-angle cuts if I am making bushcrafty stuff or whittling.

With all saws the trick is to not force the cut. A good saw does the work and needs only light downward pressure. This is particularly important with the Japanese-style teeth. These are narrow and induction hardened and can break from excessive pressure.
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