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Camping The Camping forum is for discussion that relates directly to wilderness camping (commonly referred to as car camping).


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  #1  
Old 10-07-2010, 08:39 AM
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Eces Eces is offline
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California Snow Car Camp Recommendations

Hi there. This is my first official post! (other than my "Introduce Yourself" offering).

With winter approaching I've been considering trying my hand at snow camping. The problem is that Ive never done it. I've driven in the snow a lot. Skiied and snowboarded for decades now (oof!), been x-country skiing a tiny bit (many years ago). I love a sunny snow day and nothing beats the silence and solitude of being out in the snowy woods.

I'm excited for the experience but I want to take it slow (not interested in frost bite or hypothermia). To this end, I'm wondering if anyone can recommend a good spot (not too far from SF...Tahoe area?) where I can set up camp within near walking distance of (but preferably out of site of) my car. I feel like this will give me a retreat if I need it and I can overpack as well. I'll start out with backpacking gear and fall back on other items if/when needed.

Anyone have any nice recommendations?

Thanks!

E.
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Old 10-09-2010, 06:34 AM
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Bradleystj Bradleystj is offline
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Backpack: Gregory Triconi 60
Sleeping Gear: Clark Z-Liner;DIY pocket pads;Marmot Trestles -3°F/-19°C Bag; old down bag; Outbound -5C synth bag
Shelter: ClarkJH's NX150;TX150;Tropical2; Vertex Rain Fly & Vertex Camo Rain Fly
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: West Kootenay, BC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eces
. . . I've been considering trying my hand at snow camping. The problem is that Ive never done it. . . I'll start out with backpacking gear and fall back on other items if/when needed.
Anyone have any nice recommendations?
Thanks!
E.
I'm not from your area so . . .

. . . but a good hammock with Under Quilt etc.
or even
a igloo maker is a cool idea
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Old 10-09-2010, 08:26 AM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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i'm with bradley on this one... igloos are fun.


it's kind of like regular camping, you really just wear more. you're going to need a different sleeping bag i think, though, unless you're gonna sleep in the auto. if you're hammocking, a good lower-quilt plus a bag rated down into i think the 10s-20s would get the job done. getting up in the morning can suck though. one reason i stick to a tent after the first of october.

a good liquid-fueled stove for winter conditions or something that runs on pure propane is smart. these stoves have the advantage of being easier to run for longer if you have to melt snow for water. if you want a traditional 'backpacking' stove, one of the white-gas remotes or a isobutane remote would get the job done very well indeed.


probably the two toughest things in winter are sleeping and cooking.
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Old 10-13-2010, 07:15 AM
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Eces Eces is offline
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Thanks for the tips guys. I've been thinking about the igloo thing too. I think that sounds like a great idea. I'll give it a shot.

I've been reading up about hammock set ups and its really tempting. I wake up frequently when sleeping on the ground, it'd be amazing if that issue could be solved. That'll have to wait for more flush times though.

Thanks again,

E.
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