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Fishing & Hunting The Fishing & Hunting forum is for discussion (on-site content) that directly relates to wilderness fishing and hunting with an emphasis on engaging in these activities while on backpacking trips. Lightweight/packable gear, personal experience/technique, and trip reports are of central focus. [Reminder: PBF is for actual content, not links/reference to offsite content.]


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  #21  
Old 01-03-2011, 07:41 PM
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richwads richwads is offline
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Below is one answer to a packable .22 rifle - a single shot TC Contender carbine with composite stocks, at 4.7 lb, which can be taken down to barrel and stock/action for packing.

The fine bead front sight and Williams peep sight, with a sight radius of 21", allows far better "field" accuracy (i.e. other than bench rest) than my 16" barreled Marlin Papoose with open rear sight and fat ramp front sight.

One important thing about a survival rifle is the need to make the first shot count - not necessarily to save ammo, but because game doesn't usually allow us more than one . I'm thinkin', "If I'm gonna need a gun, how many compromises can I afford?"

I haven't packed it yet (just got the stocks to check them out) but the .357 version I'm working on will be with me next deer season instead of my trusty .30-30. But - that will be an update on a different thread.


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  #22  
Old 01-03-2011, 08:36 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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oh if only the T/C series were a little lighter on the wallet...

they are great guns, i give them that.

nice suggestion.
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  #23  
Old 01-04-2011, 01:45 PM
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richwads richwads is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
oh if only the T/C series were a little lighter on the wallet...

That fact has definitely slowed me down . . .

Cabela's used to carry carbine barrels, in a large number of calibers. They don't carry barrels any more, and standard calibers from TC have been drastically reduced, which don't include the handgun calibers. This means I need a custom barrel, and TC's barrel shop is temporarily closed for retooling. A couple other barrel makers can fill the gap, but at a $100 premium, more or less.

So I wait patiently . . . .

I'm really glad I got that .22 barrel from Cabela's back in the day!
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  #24  
Old 12-04-2011, 05:25 PM
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Ralph Ralph is offline
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Thinking about the 10-22: FWIW the rotary magazine fits perfectly in the Uncle Mike speedloader pouch. Mostly I have seen these in two-pocket versions so you can carry two additional loaded magazines neatly and cleanly in a compact belt pouch.
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  #25  
Old 12-04-2011, 06:28 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
honestly, i think i'd go with the henry. too versatile for me to pass up.

thoughts? anyone have experience with the henry AR7?

FWIW. Here's a snapshot of the stock of my Henry.



Reality
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  #26  
Old 12-04-2011, 08:17 PM
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Ralph Ralph is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benwaller
The 24 is no longer legal to sell in California because it can be broken into pieces without aid of tools.

People keep reminding me why I do not live in California.

One of the minor improvements that Henry made to the Surival Rifle was to make the insert large enough to take the action with magazine (the earlier versions required the magazine be removed.)

The AR-7/Henry Survival Rifle in .22LR. IMO the best of the AR-7s. I made a webbing sling for mine that wraps around the stock and has a loop for the barrel. I am going to replace the post front sight with a fiber-optic one but aside from that this is a fine, simple rifle, light, compact and very accurate.

Survival AR-7.jpg

The M-4 survival rifle in .22 Hornet, As I recall these were made by Ithaca and had a 14" barrel. I would really like to see someone make these in a 16" barrel. The .22 Hornet is both accurate and effective in many roles.

Survival M-4.jpg

The M-6 Survival Gun in .22LR and .410 - 3" chamber. I wrapped the barrels with 550 cord to form a sort-of forearm. I used an Uncle Mike barrel band for the front sling attachment. The sling is 1" quick-adjust nylon.

Survival M-6.jpg

The Marlin Model 70PSS in .22LR takes down similar to the AR-7 but would be better, I think, if you want to mount a scope. I'm told the provided case is a touch too small to hold a mounted scope, but I would be inclined to make one of my own. Hint to gun-makers: when you include a case of any kind please do not emblazon with words that say "GUN!!!" in bold letters.

Survival Marlin 70PSS.jpg

The S&W Model 317 in .22LR is a great kit gun, 8-shot, smooth action, very accurate very light - a good gun for the survival kit when you don't have room for the long gun.

Survival-S&W 317.jpg

The AR-7, M-4 and M-6 are purpose-designed to be survival guns. One advantage of the M-6 and the 317 is that you can use the entire range of .22 rimfire, from BB-Cap to ultra-high velocity rounds without a problem. Autoloaders can be persnickety about ammunition.

The .22 rimfire is a remarkable load - intrinsically accurate and very effective within its range. Don't underestimate its ability as a defensive round, I recently saw a demonstration where a .22LR penetrated 4 layers of heavy denim and about 7" of packed meat at 200 yards. 500 rounds are about the same weight and bulk as 40 rounds of most centerfire ammunition and are quite reasonable in price.
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  #27  
Old 12-05-2011, 02:35 AM
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Bushwalker Bushwalker is offline
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Regulations and licensing laws are a bit more strict over here in New South Wales, so the situation is quiet different overall:

* Automatic and semi-auto' rifles, and self-loading shotguns, are "prohibited" weapons overe here ~ so that only police, military, and people with special reasons, (and some crim's - of course..), have access to such weapons;
* To own a fiream, a person must be licensed ~ and to get their shooters licence they have to be 18 years old, need to have a reason (or belong to a rifle or pistol club..), and have to do a compulsory firearms safety course (normally through one of the shooters associations/clubs/ranges/some dealers - easily enough arranged..);
* Children between 12 and 18 ~ can get a restricted "Minor's Permit", for shooting instruction and practice ~ under qualified supervision...

Obviously the range of weapons will therefore also be a bit more restricted than over in the USA ~ no M-15's or pump-action shotguns, for example ~ but there still seems to be a fair range of lightweight .22/.223/.270/30-06/"Over-and-unders" guns available here, that could fit the bill as a backpacking/survival/4WD-and-SUV weapon..

Maybe around half the guns that have been diiscussed here.
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  #28  
Old 12-14-2011, 10:11 PM
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Debkirk Debkirk is offline
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I agree with Ralph and others; I have had an M-6 Scout for 20+ years. The .22 component is as accurate as it needs to be and the .410 is an essential for bikepackers like us. The shotgun option gives one a birdshot option for snakes and such, and being able to chamber a slug or buckshot put one's mind at ease in predator country (bears not considered). The gun has a compartment for extra ammo in the stock and takes down into 2 pieces. The down side is that it is heavy, at about 4 lbs.
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  #29  
Old 12-15-2011, 02:12 AM
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Bushwalker Bushwalker is offline
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Despite some people downunder (Oz and NZ) liking to whinge about weapons laws being "too" harsh over here, the sort of weapon being discussed here ~ a .22 (or even .223, .270 or 30.06) calibre "over and under" gun with .410/12guage shotgun ~ could be quite an acceptable and viable choice for 4WD/SUV, bikepacking and horsepacking, or boating...

And quite legal - for an ordinary, everyday licensed shooter - and unlikely to raise any suspicions with police, or other shooters or travellers, if they see it..

But four pounds/a couple of kilograms - plus ammo - means thinking carefully about adding one to backpacking kit. (I don't.. BUT, if I were going away for an extended trip, I would re-consider..).

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  #30  
Old 12-15-2011, 05:32 AM
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Ralph Ralph is offline
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A couple of ideas for the DIYer.

When I was 18 I picked up a junk-shop rolling block .22LR, takedown octagonal barrel. Installed a barrel liner, cut down the barrel to 16" and reinstalled the front sight. Some light stock work to repair a chipped toe and a canvas carry case completed an accurate backpack rifle I carried for years. Moved by misguided generosity I gave it to a friend.

Marlin sold a bolt-action takedown .22 for awhile. The method is applicable with any light rifle using a single barrel screw. Replace the slotted barrel screw with a knurled thumbscrew. cut the barrel to 16", recrown and cold blue the bright end. Cut the forend to about an inch or so in front of the barrel screw. The stock and forend should be about the same length as the barreled action. Install the sight combination of your choice and a light carry case for the two parts.

With a light scope you can omit the front sight. An aperture sight with a fiber-optic front is a good combination for aging eyes. The only real difficulty is cutting the dovetail on a round barrel for the front sight. You can buy a jig for this purpose from Brownell's.
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