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Fishing & Hunting The Fishing & Hunting forum is for discussion (on-site content) that directly relates to wilderness fishing and hunting with an emphasis on engaging in these activities while on backpacking trips. Lightweight/packable gear, personal experience/technique, and trip reports are of central focus. [Reminder: PBF is for actual content, not links/reference to offsite content.]


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  #21  
Old 04-02-2011, 08:53 PM
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Hanr3 Hanr3 is offline
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I prefer teh 12ga. Remington 870 pump. It'll shoot pretty much anything (rabbit, deer, bear, duck, etc.) with teh right load. Plus its highly dependable, and extremely accurate. You can get it in 2-3/4", 3", 3-1/2" shell length. Plus the combo package includes a 2nd barrel. I have a 18" smooth bore and a 28" smooth bore.

Besides, a 1 ounce slug will make any charging animal stop in its tracks.
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  #22  
Old 04-03-2011, 11:25 AM
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GWyble GWyble is offline
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Here in Missouri if you mention a brush gun and pretty quickly someone will mention a lever action 30/30. Since most of the shots around here are less than 100 yards a 30/30 will get the job done. A few years ago I starting hunting farther back in the woods and decided I needed a brush gun. I did a little research and found someone who had tested several calibers on their ability to take game in the brush. The focus was on the effect on bullet path after striking a small twig. Surprisingly the results showed that a fast small bullet was better than a large slow bullet. The best results came from a 22-250.

My final choice was a Remington bolt action 30-06 with a sythetic stock and 3x9 scope. The gun was affordable and had a finish I wasn't too worried about scratching up. I turn the scope power down to 3 when I get in the woods. This way I can see any limbs between myself and the target and get a larger site picture.

I prefer the simplicty of a bolt action. A semi auto can make you take a poor first shot because follow up shots are quicker. That being said my grandfather had a .308 lever action Savage that was great.
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  #23  
Old 04-03-2011, 05:59 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GWyble
Here in Missouri if you mention a brush gun and pretty quickly someone will mention a lever action 30/30. Since most of the shots around here are less than 100 yards a 30/30 will get the job done. A few years ago I starting hunting farther back in the woods and decided I needed a brush gun. I did a little research and found someone who had tested several calibers on their ability to take game in the brush. The focus was on the effect on bullet path after striking a small twig. Surprisingly the results showed that a fast small bullet was better than a large slow bullet. The best results came from a 22-250.

My final choice was a Remington bolt action 30-06 with a sythetic stock and 3x9 scope. The gun was affordable and had a finish I wasn't too worried about scratching up. I turn the scope power down to 3 when I get in the woods. This way I can see any limbs between myself and the target and get a larger site picture.


I prefer the simplicty of a bolt action. A semi auto can make you take a poor first shot because follow up shots are quicker. That being said my grandfather had a .308 lever action Savage that was great.

30-30 is one of those 'it ain't broke, let's not fix it' sort of calibers. there's a reason it's one of the top sellers of all time. same deal with .30-06 and .270win. they're rounds that deliver.

bullet deflection is a really sketchy subject that depends on a lot of things, but velocity is extremely important in that regard. heavy rounds at moderate velocity bull on through without deflection because of inertia, but can easily deform or tumble and lose all their penetration. light high-velocity rounds can zip though, but it can be really unpredictable, i've seen high deviation on light rounds in addition to great brush performance. solid, higher-weight, medium to high velocity rounds seem to do the best, or at least the most predictably. note the popularity of the 30-06 and .308 cartridges.

the manual-action vs semi-auto debate will probably go on for eternity.
quick-cycling manual actions seem to be the best of both worlds, but for the most part your cartridge selection becomes really limited, the heavier-hitting cartridges are not terribly popular, with a few exceptions.

still waiting on a .454 casull levergun. probably never happen, but a guy can dream, right?
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  #25  
Old 05-12-2011, 07:13 PM
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MoondogFiftyfive MoondogFiftyfive is offline
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I have just decided on my new hunting rifle and as most Sambar are taken at very short range the "Brush gun" nomenclature suits.
I am going to make up ( or actually have made up as I am useless with a welder and lathe ) one of the classic wildcats of the dominions; the SMLE or #4 action 35-303
Very similar ballistics to 35 Rem. 358 Win

I like the way a Smellie action works so smoothly and quickly and while I may not need 10 shots to bring a deer down it i s handy having that capability
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  #26  
Old 05-13-2011, 06:50 AM
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Kirt Kirt is offline
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For deer, I use a Browning Auto-5 12 gauge circa late 1930s. Where I deer hunt it's shotgun only. Small game I use my Ruger MK-I .22 pistol.

If I had a choice, bolt action rifle for the simplicity.
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  #27  
Old 05-29-2011, 11:20 AM
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WildlifeNate WildlifeNate is offline
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My dad gave me his Remington 11-87 Premier 12ga with 2 barrels - rifled and smooth bore this year. It can handle up to 3" shells.

By the time I got my hunter's ed finished and my TX license, I essentially missed out on deer season here. There was a little time left on private properties under a management plan, but since I don't have a hunting lease, I couldn't get in on one of those last weekends. Turkey are uncommon here and mostly limited to private lands, as well. Pretty much all I can shoot for the rest of the year are hogs.

It's uncommon here for people to actually stalk their quarry. More often than not, since most hunting is done on private lands, hunters will bait a location and then hunt out of a permanent treestand. However, that's not how I was taught and I won't hunt that way.
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  #28  
Old 08-23-2011, 07:30 PM
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Benwaller Benwaller is offline
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I agree with that. My Old Man schooled me to walk slow, sometimes just one step a minute or less, and I can still approach game (not elk; for some reason they seem to be more intelligent than their smaller cousins) in an open clearing and get close enough to hit 'em with a rock. BS? If the wind is right and the light is right it can be done.

Actually, I think it should be done by everybody at least once. And no, the zoo does not count.

The word hunting is, I think, the infinitive form of the verb hunt. Action. Doing something. Pulling the trigger is not hunting and neither is shivering in a tree stand waiting for an animal to come to the salt lick.

That's how I call it. Learned it that way more'n half a century ago, so that's how it will stay, for me anyways.

YMMV and so forth and that's fine.
Ben
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  #29  
Old 08-26-2011, 09:48 AM
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WildlifeNate WildlifeNate is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benwaller
I agree with that. My Old Man schooled me to walk slow, sometimes just one step a minute or less, and I can still approach game (not elk; for some reason they seem to be more intelligent than their smaller cousins) in an open clearing and get close enough to hit 'em with a rock. BS? If the wind is right and the light is right it can be done.

Actually, I think it should be done by everybody at least once. And no, the zoo does not count.

The word hunting is, I think, the infinitive form of the verb hunt. Action. Doing something. Pulling the trigger is not hunting and neither is shivering in a tree stand waiting for an animal to come to the salt lick.

That's how I call it. Learned it that way more'n half a century ago, so that's how it will stay, for me anyways.

YMMV and so forth and that's fine.
Ben

I was taught to hunt where there are few clearings and oftentimes too many hunters in small parcels of public land to safely stalk deer. What I was taught to do was to visit a place to scout it for deer activity - rubs, trails, scat, etc. Find where deer are likely to travel and find a spot to wait them out at the base of a tree, in a thicket, or something along those lines.

I would like to be able to hunt in a stalking method, because I do oftentimes get scary close to them when I'm not even trying. Not here in TX, though. I can count the times on one hand where I've encountered deer while hiking or mountain biking and still have room left over.

I've only once spent significant time in elk country. It was not hunting season at the time, but I did try my hand at stalking a bull elk in the middle of a clearing. He was wily, that's for sure. But I did manage to get close enough to snap a few pictures with a little 35mm P&S before he had enough and ran into the woods. Probably would have been close enough for a shotgun using a rifled barrel. I managed to get out into the clearing with him and from what I recall, I had the sun at my back and shadows from the edge of the clearing on me. I do not know what the wind direction was, because I was hiking a trail, popped out of the forest, and there the elk was. I had to dig my camera out of my pack.
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  #30  
Old 08-26-2011, 10:14 AM
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richwads richwads is offline
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Well, after all my plans to build up a TC Contender Carbine for this deer season, I've decided to go back to the longbow for a "brush gun". Got an Archery Only tag for most of California; it's early deer season in my County right now, but I'm going north in late September for the late season. I have to renew my contacts around here for permission to bow hunt private property (Santa Cruz County), or wait for a buck to eat my garden during legal hunting hours .

Well, the odds of my getting within 15-20 yards of a buck are pretty slim, but my backyard target has been drilled at that distance, so here's hoping!

BTW, I consider it a "brush" weapon, because it's pretty hard to sneak up that close in the wide open spaces, and in these redwood understory forests its pretty much "by the time you see it it's almost in range."
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