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Fishing & Hunting The Fishing & Hunting forum is for discussion (on-site content) that directly relates to wilderness fishing and hunting with an emphasis on engaging in these activities while on backpacking trips. Lightweight/packable gear, personal experience/technique, and trip reports are of central focus. [Reminder: PBF is for actual content, not links/reference to offsite content.]


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  #11  
Old 03-18-2010, 08:10 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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for brush rifles, i have to agree with the last of what rich said, though i'd choose .44 magnum, mostly for the bigger wallop and better energy delivery.

i'm a pistol carbine sort of fellow when it comes to brush guns for a few reasons... they're fast in the hands, accurate and powerful(even mild pistol rounds pick up some real heat in that really long barrel.), cheap to feed(this is crucial i think), and reliable. the other fun part is that you can get a pistol chambered to match your rifle(and depending on the load, you can load to match as well).

contenders are fantastic guns. while i'm not a fan of single shot actions, they can get the job DONE. the sheer versatility of the contender action is a fantastic value, it's similar to the desert eagle, just buy a new barrel and you're ready to rock.
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  #12  
Old 03-20-2010, 04:32 PM
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richwads richwads is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richwads
The Contender carbine's specs: Total weight - 4.5 lb, barrel length - 21 inches, overall length - 34 inches!
Correction - I put my .22 barrel carbine together to actually measure and weigh it and found my original specs to be faulty memory .

It does have a 21 inch barrel, but the total length is 35 inches, and the weight is 5.5 lb.

I'm now inspired to get a another custom barrel (stainless or blued?, tapered or bull? 21" or 23"?) in another pistol caliber (.357 or .44?).

Web sources list the velocity of the 158 gr .357 at 1830 fps from a rifle barrel (length not specified), which equals the original .30-30 loading and far exceeds most other rifle loads in those days, and which were all good meat providers at the time.

Mind candy .
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  #13  
Old 03-20-2010, 06:05 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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i'd go with the .44, rich.. you can load it down to equal the .357's kick and noise, or load it up to give yourself one mean game-gun.

or hey, go with one of the old classics like .44-40 or something along those lines. those old black powder rounds could really deliver with the right load. then you'd have an excuse to get a Colt SAA in matching caliber.

and so it begins...
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  #14  
Old 03-26-2010, 06:38 AM
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djmamayek djmamayek is offline
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I love my Marlin 1894 in .357 Mag. Plenty of stopping power, useful for whitetail, or even black bear. I can cycle .38 specials through it for rabbit or even turkey if I wanted to.
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  #15  
Old 04-07-2010, 06:38 PM
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etowah etowah is offline
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Quote:
As to brush RIFLES, one should consider a TC Contender carbine.

Nice choice. I have a Ruger 44 magnum carbine that works well for me in brush.
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  #16  
Old 04-07-2010, 07:31 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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i've considered, off and on, converting a longer semi-auto to a bullpup configuration to make a short carbine. say, something as big as the M1-A rifle, could become pretty short in bullpup configuration.
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  #17  
Old 09-28-2010, 08:02 PM
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Benwaller Benwaller is offline
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Put me down for the venerable Marlin 336 30-30.

With 34 grains of H335 under a 150 gr Hornady she works well enough to reliably smoke a bowling pin at 175 yards. Standing up. Slung. A Williams iron sight setup (light-gathering front, peep/ghost rear) helps me point it.

I bought it 30 years ago and have reloaded for it since new; the load noted above approaches MOA. Plus I have always liked the way it carries in the hand, perfect balance amidships the receiver. Remember the first law of Hammurabi, "Fit no scope on thy trusty lever gun". In my view a scope just ruins the balance of a lever rifle and generally ruins the form. Though a scope can improve your shot placement at almost any yardage, the real hunting game is to sneak up as close as possible to the critter, to say, within a hundred yards, and harvest it, not unintentionally blow it's horns off from across the canyon. There has to be some sport in the sport or it just isn't sport anymore. At least that's the way I heard it from my Old Man, so that's the way I taught to my kids.

I've also owned a Guide Gun, 1895G in 45/70 which would be my first choice in country over-run by dangerous game, but it was just way too much gun to be much fun so I sold it. Threw in a handful of ear plugs to sweeten the deal.

Yeah, in my view the lever is the best brush gun for a number of reasons including the fact that it can be cycled fast and reliable from the shoulder without compromising the sight picture. It's also got a couple of good safeties so if you fall down (and you will) you won't, and whoever you're with won't, inadvertantly succumb to rifle fire. We all know that never happens.

Marlin 30-30. Don't leave home without it.

Ben
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  #18  
Old 09-29-2010, 01:00 AM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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well said ben. lever guns are fantastic in the brush, and the 30-30 has been knocking them down for what, almost 120 years now?

performance is great, energy delivered is pretty solid. a lever gun with a tubular magazine feels great, is quick on target and if you need a second shot, it's maybe about a second away.

one of the things i really love about lever-guns is the fact that you can cycle the action without taking your eyes off the sight picture. the only bolt actions that can do that are some of the shortie magnum cartridges, and even then it's iffy and takes practice to not pull away. pump-action can do it, but you don't see a terrible lot of pump-action rifles out there.

i loved my marlin 1894s in .44mag. great round, delivered performance as good as the .30-30, if not hotter, packed more rounds in the magazine, and was a joy to shoot and easy to feed.

i'm really looking forward to taking out my .270 though. for a bolt-gun(and a long one at that) it's surprisingly nimble and VERY quick.
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  #19  
Old 10-02-2010, 04:34 AM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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here's a thought that i didn't think till now:

7.62x39.

yes, that old horse. the energy downrange is comparable to .30-30, thanks to a markedly more efficient bullet, but the recoil is lower on account of smaller powder charge.

it's not that common, save in the ubiquitous soviet designs, but both ruger and CZ are producing bolt-action guns in the caliber that are pretty lightweight and compact. CZ-527 ticks in at just under 6 pounds without a scope(has iron sights). calculator says that recoil energy with a 2400 fps 125 grain round is in the 8 pound range at 9fps, which is nice and easy for such a light gun.

the ballistics are good. nothing fantastic, but a 150-yard zero will shoot minute of deer up to about 200 yards or so no sweat, coming in just about 3.5" low at 200 and 2.5-ish high at 100.

CZ's action in the 527 is short and fast. the gun points naturally and the iron sights are pretty decent.

list price is kind of high at 757 USD MSRP. still, CZ builds a great gun.
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  #20  
Old 01-06-2011, 05:20 PM
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richwads richwads is offline
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I won’t get into the story that goes with this picture except to say that I was happy with bullet placement considering it was a short range “jump shot” with a single shot carbine. I guess that’s when I fell in love with this little gun. Anyway, I found this while going through old pictures and was struck by how tiny this carbine looks, even when held by 5’ 6” me, so it’s easy to see how handy it would be in the woods.



This was a Thompson Center Contender carbine with 21” barrel in .357 maximum. That barrel was sold for reasons described in a previous post. It had walnut stocks which have recently been replaced with composite stocks with a .22 barrel, shown in a recent post in the AR7 - .22 rifles thread. As I said there, I’m waiting for the TC Custom shop to re-open their custom barrel section so I can pick up a 357 magnum barrel. That barrel should handle squib loads better than the precious 357 max barrel, as the bullet jump from the short 38 case in the long max chamber caused too many keyhole fliers for my taste.

I’ll keep this thread posted on my progress with this project.
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