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Fishing & Hunting The Fishing & Hunting forum is for discussion (on-site content) that directly relates to wilderness fishing and hunting with an emphasis on engaging in these activities while on backpacking trips. Lightweight/packable gear, personal experience/technique, and trip reports are of central focus. [Reminder: PBF is for actual content, not links/reference to offsite content.]


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  #11  
Old 01-04-2010, 10:30 AM
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richwads richwads is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
my kit fits neatly into an ALICE buttpack, for bowhunting. easy to carry, out of the way, and plenty of items and tools. the 'hawk goes on the belt alongside the quiver. field knife either goes on one of the shoulder straps of the buttpack(handle down) or on the other side of the belt. camelbak tied into the shoulder straps of the pack. pouches with poncho(rolled tight), line, food, and some field dressing tools on the side opposite the quiver along with E-tool. poncho liner(blanket) rolled tight and strapped to bottom of buttpack. the total rig weighs in at about ten pounds or so with the camelback empty, arrows in quiver.

Your setup sounds good. I was never quite satisfied with my hunting pack setup. A pack frame with mostly emptied out pack (stuff left at base camp) has the most possibilities for carrying survival and hunting gear, as well as packing out meat, but shouldering a rifle to shoot, or slinging a rifle, is difficult so I gave up the frame idea. A daypack is good, with webbing shoulder straps rather than padded, and I used a cotton duck version for many years because of it quietness in brush compared to nylon. When bowhunting, however, I found my draw to be encumbered by the shoulder straps, which tried to rearrange themselves as I approached full draw, so I switched to a fanny pack. I found a practical one at Cabela's, that includes a water bottle pocket, knife or flashlight pocket, and a flap over the top zipper with long enough straps to cinch a rolled up poncho or jacket under without having to stuff it inside. When fully packed, it did need to be "cinched up" to my butt fairly often, and I hear you when you mention suspenders , tho I never tried them. That ALICE pack sounds like the ticket.

My hunting pack includes rope and pulley for hanging and skinning, and a game bag, and I resigned myself to the idea of having to leave meat for the night hoping critters didn't tear into it, and come back with full-sized pack (and help ) the next day.

Actually, I'm switching to handgun/backpack hunting next, so I can start over with the daypack idea, which might just be my new internal frame REI Flash 50, tho I think a camo fleece pack would be better.

Do your ALICE pack's shoulder straps preclude slinging a rifle, or interfere with shouldering it to shoot?
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  #12  
Old 01-04-2010, 12:48 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richwads
Your setup sounds good. I was never quite satisfied with my hunting pack setup. A pack frame with mostly emptied out pack (stuff left at base camp) has the most possibilities for carrying survival and hunting gear, as well as packing out meat, but shouldering a rifle to shoot, or slinging a rifle, is difficult so I gave up the frame idea.
if you're still interested pack and rifle, try using a longer sling with the rifle slung muzzle down. it's a little more comfortable, and faster to bear than the traditional method. you also don't have it flagging game when you shift it. but frames are really tough to use with rifles. it's worth noting that a lot of army infantry either just carry their rifles, use special slings that keep the gun against their fronts, or in old days they would sling over their necks somtimes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by richwads
A daypack is good, with webbing shoulder straps rather than padded, and I used a cotton duck version for many years because of it quietness in brush compared to nylon. When bowhunting, however, I found my draw to be encumbered by the shoulder straps, which tried to rearrange themselves as I approached full draw, so I switched to a fanny pack.
sternum straps might alleviate this, but i can't say how much. i use a sternum strap on my ALICE suspenders to keep them in place(they don't shift much though).

Quote:
Originally Posted by richwads
I found a practical one at Cabela's, that includes a water bottle pocket, knife or flashlight pocket, and a flap over the top zipper with long enough straps to cinch a rolled up poncho or jacket under without having to stuff it inside. When fully packed, it did need to be "cinched up" to my butt fairly often, and I hear you when you mention suspenders , tho I never tried them. That ALICE pack sounds like the ticket.
suspenders make all the difference in the world. the ones i use are designed to integrate to the ALICE pack and the web belt with hooks that resemble carabiners. pretty rugged and they don't come out easy. there are versions of these straps meant to work with the police pistol belts, which have snap loops or velcro loops that you wrap around your belt. if you have a blumenthal's nearby, you might be able to snag a set, and ressurect your fanny pack.

Quote:
Originally Posted by richwads
My hunting pack includes rope and pulley for hanging and skinning, and a game bag, and I resigned myself to the idea of having to leave meat for the night hoping critters didn't tear into it, and come back with full-sized pack (and help ) the next day.
this is the single toughest part of packing for any sort of mobile hunt, for me. i don't take a block and tackle(wish i could. the cargo tape i have just isn't enough, and paracord is hard to use), instead relying on about 50' of half inch cargo tape/strap that's ridiculously strong. a few trucker's hitches and it'll lift just about anything. i generally try to carry or drag out then and there if i can. i'll bleed and gut on site, which can, depending on what i keep from the bits, lighten the load by up to 20-30%. never sure how much but it's significant enough. generally lungs get tossed, along with lower intestine, bladder, and usually the stomach. it's enough to get out of there alright(though take care if you choose to carry. i once had a deer i was carrying out get shot with an arrow, while it was on my shoulders. i didn't know it till i got back to camp, and the guy who shot it didn't know i was carrying the deer. buck fever. we got lucky that day), most times. but with larger game like caribou/elk... it's smart to have either a horse or an ATV nearby.

Quote:
Originally Posted by richwads
Actually, I'm switching to handgun/backpack hunting next, so I can start over with the daypack idea, which might just be my new internal frame REI Flash 50, tho I think a camo fleece pack would be better.

Do your ALICE pack's shoulder straps preclude slinging a rifle, or interfere with shouldering it to shoot?
generally, the Y-type(and the earlier pattern H-type) don't get in the way of either activity at all. the straps are padded mostly as a formality(to help keep some shape), and are, when properly fitted, very close riding. i generally sling muzzle down, with the underside of the gun facing forward. this really keeps the rifle out of the way, though i usually leave off any side-bag on the buttpack when i do this. i've taken more often of late, attaching my buttpack to my load vest(molle/alice compatible, by blackhawk(300 dollars)). the vest is even better at bearing loads, and comes with an integrated shooting pad over the right shoulder(with non-slip rubberizing). the vest gets in the way of my draw something fierce with a bow, but it's the ticket to carrying more stuff for late fall/winter hunting. it can also be loaded with float pads, for when i decide to go hunting in the islands and i do crossings in a canoe.

lemme know how that REI pack works out. i've been eyeing it as a daypack/shortrange pack.
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  #13  
Old 01-04-2010, 05:43 PM
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richwads richwads is offline
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I also carry my rifle slung butt up (left side for right-handed), bottom forward, and find it quick to bring to shooting position, but can't do this with an external frame. I have slung the whole thing over the frame when packing in, but it would be funny to watch me get it off if I saw game at that time .

Instead of "block and tackle", 20 ft of rope with two lightweight marine pulleys work well, giving a 2 to 1 advantage, by tying one pulley to the load and tossing the rope/other pulley over a branch and threading the rope properly. I've only actually used this outside of camp on one occasion, and had the boned out animal back to base camp by noon (maybe 2 miles). Sure beat dragging the critter 2 miles uphill! Done that too.

Keep in mind I'm 135 lb soaking wet, and take every advantage I can to reduce my load (tho I'm not UL base weight yet).
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  #14  
Old 01-16-2010, 03:43 PM
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MoondogFiftyfive MoondogFiftyfive is offline
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And another question/ I carry a different first-aid kit when rifle hunting, mainly because I include an extra Field Dressing and stronger pain killers, just in case of a serious incident.
While I hunt in safety orange camouflage I have been thinking of adding a reflective vest for walking back to base camp after dark or for extra safety if I happen tp be walking out with a trophy on my back -> two even one for me plus one for the trophy.
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  #15  
Old 01-16-2010, 08:25 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MoondogFiftyfive
And another question/ I carry a different first-aid kit when rifle hunting, mainly because I include an extra Field Dressing and stronger pain killers, just in case of a serious incident.
While I hunt in safety orange camouflage I have been thinking of adding a reflective vest for walking back to base camp after dark or for extra safety if I happen tp be walking out with a trophy on my back -> two even one for me plus one for the trophy.

hey... you might be on to something.

i knew someone who had a few yards of a reflective tape that he took out. he'd wrap it around the deer's antlers after loading it onto his quad.

if i can hunt without the orange, i do, mostly because a lot of the safety orange gear fluoresces in the UV spectrum, which deer happen to see partly into. bow season here in washington has no safety orange requirement, but rifle season does.

at least deer are colorblind... but the UV reflective dyes... it doesn't matter what camo pattern you wear if you're glowing like a light bulb.

reflective vests/tape... good idea though. you could probably get a vest on the cheap, get one at a construction supply store maybe, or heck, even home depot. the bright green type, that are really eye-searing. the green won't get dark when it's night out.
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  #16  
Old 01-17-2010, 01:53 AM
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MoondogFiftyfive MoondogFiftyfive is offline
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The trick is to find old orange safety gear that doesn't glow in UV, and then bleach, paint or die to suit the country.
Most US and NewZealand made camo is far to dark for the Aussie bush so a few drops of Chlorine bleach and a wash does a really good job.

I usually add a little olive green or reddish brown to give the illusion of depth tho
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  #17  
Old 01-17-2010, 04:53 AM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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fair enough. i myself like using a ghillie cloak, or shooting from a hide, when i'm rifle hunting. as i use a wood longbow for bow season, i have to stalk. it's pretty much impossible to shoot a bow that's a hair over six feet long from inside a concealed position.

the bright green vests have a lot of advantages, after thinking about it. they're going to be pretty light, and compact when packed. and unless you're out on a night with complete cloud cover and ZERO ambient light, you should be pretty visible in all conditions.

as for the collected game... they do make belts of a more reflective version of the material, for use by joggers. they stand out pretty well, and they'd be a pretty good option. one or two of those would be easy to pack and go on the deer fast.
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  #18  
Old 12-15-2011, 02:08 PM
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Ralph Ralph is offline
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Back in the day when I carried an army combat pack I preferred the H-harness. The Y type tended to twist too easily. Mountainsmith has several models of lumbar pack designed to use their "Strapettes". If you have a chance to examine one of these it is really not much of a problem to adapt other types of lumbar pack to these straps. The Strapettes are lightly padded in an X configuration that keep the pack from swinging out at the top and take some of the weight off the belt.

I have several packs that ride low to allow upper body freedom.

The smallest is the Mountainsmith Buzz. This carries two water bottles and two belt pockets. The back pocket is VERY small and capable of carrying not much more than an emergency kit. It's okay for a stroll in the country.

The Orvis Safe Passage waist pack is designed for fishing, carries two water bottles and has a back pocket capable of carrying lunch and an emergency kit. I use this in conjunction with the Safe Passage mini chest pack.

The Mountainsmith Cairn - with Strapettes - is capable of carrying emergency bivouac gear in addition to two water bottles. Lots of organization. I added a couple of loops to lash on rain gear, two strap pockets and a couple of belt pouches.

I made a small pack based more or less on Kifaru's Tailgunner that is a fine, mid-size field pack with PALS on pack and belt to take a variety of MOLLE compatible pockets and pouches, added to suit the task at hand.

I have an old Mountainsmith Tyrol that rides low and serves as my light backpack, capable of carrying a comfortable light camp and 3 days food supply.

These are all good packs, possibly some of the best available for their pupose.
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