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Bikepacking The Bikebacking forum is for discussion that relates directly to bikepacking (also known as bicycle camping). Subject matter should involve the backpacking/camping/bike gear and trip planning as it relates to mountain biking and bicycle touring.


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  #11  
Old 10-01-2009, 08:43 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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better than you think, especially if you take along some steel mesh to put over it while it's burning, to catch sparks. some legs to keep it off the ground are useful too, especially if you can make them folding.
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  #12  
Old 10-02-2009, 11:13 AM
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Sparticus Sparticus is offline
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I’ve been using a bushbuddy on a lot of my trips lately. A hand full of twigs will cook a meal. No issue with throwing sparks, and it has not melted my aluminum snowpeak yet. I would think that it would make a great stove for bike tourning.
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  #13  
Old 10-02-2009, 12:57 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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one of the upshots to the wood-burning stoves, even small towns will have wood pellets/charcoal birquettes for sale in a convenience store, and in fairly small bags too.

in fact, a lot of places that sell wood pellets will do bulk sales and would probably let you buy just a pound or two.

i think they sell adapters for snow peak type stoves that would let them run on coleman bottles.
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  #14  
Old 10-02-2009, 05:58 PM
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Mountaineerbass Mountaineerbass is offline
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Wood stoves are also fun to play with if your not in a hurry.
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  #15  
Old 10-11-2009, 07:03 AM
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Cyclesafe Cyclesafe is offline
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21k miles of cycletouring experience here.

My cooking involves boiling one liter of water in a MSR XGK EX every night on the road. 14 oz of premium unleaded lasts roughly 10 days and costs less than 50 cents. Daily "cleaning" the stove involves shaking it to move a pin up and down through an extremely small fuel feeder hole and wiping off the inside of the fuel line. The stove is also very compact, nesting easily in a Dualist 1.8 liter pot.

White gas burns cleaner, but is usually available only in gallon quantities for more than $25. Quarts (usually Coleman brand) can sometimes be found for about $12. In both cases there is waste because I am usually just topping off my fuel bottle. Sometimes I'll buy or bum some white gas from a fellow camper who's otherwise wondering what they are going to do with all the extra white gas they bought. Oh, and mixing white gas with gasoline is not an issue for a multi-fuel stove.

An alcohol stove is much cheaper and lighter, but takes three times longer to boil water and uses roughly twices as much fuel. HEET (methanol) costs about $3 for 12 oz and is usually available in gas stations where it snows in winter. However, gasoline is ALWAYS available in gas stations.

Proprietary fuel canisters? Only Coleman propane and isobutane, rarely anything else. And those things are heavy.
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  #16  
Old 10-13-2009, 01:28 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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woophf, the price of good really can vary, huh? i pay between 5 and 7 dollars for a quart of coleman white gas... somewhere around that for kerosene too...

the big thing isn't proprietary fuel cans, it's the fact that not everyone uses the same type of connection(there's actually four or five different types that i've seen)... heck, they don't even use the same connections on all models of stoves by one manufacturer...

an adaptor kit that could mate any bottle type to any stove would be a handy thing, no?
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  #17  
Old 10-13-2009, 03:09 PM
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dysfunction dysfunction is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
better than you think, especially if you take along some steel mesh to put over it while it's burning, to catch sparks. some legs to keep it off the ground are useful too, especially if you can make them folding.

I'd be more than willing to bet the FS and PS rangers here wouldn't agree with you during fire restrictions.
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  #18  
Old 10-13-2009, 03:57 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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depends on the rangers.

and the area... the nature of the restrictions...

up here, it's mainly a matter of:does your fire ring/stove stand off the ground on its own? that's one of the big ones. actually, that's THE big one, aside from making sure your ashes are cold when you scatter them.

most woods aside from cedar don't throw off too many sparks, so really, avoid cedar and you're mostly set.

with that said, i've been tossing about the idea of an enclosed, controlled burning wood-fired stove. the main obstacle is getting it light enough AND small enough to be useful... it'll fit right into bikepacking though.
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  #19  
Old 10-13-2009, 04:08 PM
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dysfunction dysfunction is offline
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and yet I've NEVER seen liquid or gas fueled stoves banned... where anything that burns solid fuel is banned here every summer.
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  #20  
Old 10-14-2009, 12:02 AM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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it is strange, as solid fuel stoves don't have that whole, you know, EXPLOSION thing going for them... i've seen what happens if a liquid fueled stove should be tipped, bumped, or shifted wrong... 'fwoosh' comes to mind. especially alcohol stoves.

solid fuel burning stove of any sort, what do you get if you knock it over? a few sparks, a pile of burning coals that's easy to put out(as opposed to liquid fuels, which tend to spread when you try to use water on them, and continue to burn if you throw dirt/ash on them...) with water or dirt.

huh.

thinking about it that way makes it seem pretty strange...
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