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Bikepacking The Bikebacking forum is for discussion that relates directly to bikepacking (also known as bicycle camping). Subject matter should involve the backpacking/camping/bike gear and trip planning as it relates to mountain biking and bicycle touring.


View Poll Results: Do you wear a helmet (law required or not) when bikepacking (touring)?
Yes, always 37 71.15%
No, never 8 15.38%
Occasionally 7 13.46%
Voters: 52. You may not vote on this poll

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  #1  
Old 07-29-2009, 11:30 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Helmet Use

Do you wear a helmet (law required or not) when bikepacking (touring)?

Reality
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  #2  
Old 07-30-2009, 09:09 AM
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Hanger Hanger is offline
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I've been wearing my helmet a lot more since moved to a place with more bike accessability, but I used to rarely wear it. On my first century ride I didn't wear it once. I can't really think of a good reason except for comfort, but I don't think that comfort should trump safety. I took a nasty fall this weekend and I'm glad I was wearing my helmet.
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  #3  
Old 07-30-2009, 06:41 PM
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WildlifeNate WildlifeNate is offline
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A helmet has saved my tail more times than I care to count on all types of riding. It's a required accessory, IMO.
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  #4  
Old 03-05-2010, 06:47 AM
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Bradleystj Bradleystj is offline
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A number of years ago I moved closer to work and I parked my car.
I was about to embark on a 2 yr period of riding my bike to work.
Up and down good sized hills, and a ferry crossing.
(Funny how it seemed, that it was mostly up hill . . . both ways)
My home and work were 10 miles apart.
Our area had just enacted a bike helmet law,
so as silly as I thought it was, I was compelled to wear it.
As I lived on the coast, we seldom had snow and ice, but for one time.
It was during this time that I took a spill.
I went over backwards, and the first ground contact was
the back of my head, or rather helmet.
I hit real hard, and split the helmet
up the center from the back to almost all the way to the front.

My actual injury, was a stiff and sore neck for a few days.

I believe first, that if there was no law I would not have worn the lid.
Second, that fall without the lid, could well of resulted in my death,
or at the very least, an injury that would have been quite/very sever.
My head hit real hard . . . smokin' hard.

For what it is worth, I thought I would share my experiance,
and thank God I am still alive today.
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  #5  
Old 03-21-2010, 08:17 AM
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Vinovampire Vinovampire is offline
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I must admit, I learned my lesson with bike helmets this Fall. Luckily, I didn't wait until I had an accident to learn this lesson. In Oct, two friends of mine were touring the east coast and one of them had a terrible accident. Even with a helmet on her head, she temporarily lost some executive function. Since then, I've worn my helmet 100% of the time, even on short trips a couple blocks away from my home.
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  #6  
Old 03-23-2010, 11:55 AM
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richwads richwads is offline
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I've crashed and hit my helmet hard enough to crack the rigid foam liner (requiring a new helmet) twice, so I'm a believer.
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  #7  
Old 03-23-2010, 02:21 PM
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Lonewolf22 Lonewolf22 is offline
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You dont get in a car without puting your seatbelt on, you dont get into any sort of watercraft without puting your PFD on, and you dont get on a bike with out puting a helmet on! Its just plain common sense.
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  #8  
Old 03-24-2010, 05:28 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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All great comments! An accident (fall) can happen in one's own driveway, so it really doesn't need to be lengthy trip to prove a helmet's usefulness.

Thanks for the continued feedback. I'm sure this thread will help to sway some on the fence about helmet use into the "won't ride without it" camp.

By the way, it's better to mess up one's hair than one's brains.

Reality
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  #9  
Old 08-15-2010, 09:29 AM
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Debkirk Debkirk is offline
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If you are a cyclist, climber, and paddler, you can run yourself to the poorhouse fast by buying one for each discipline. All sport- specific brain buckets are impact protecting in their design, and they are designed to stay in place somewhat after an impact, but a paddling helmet will also keep your head above the water in the event you lose consciousness If your are a multi-sporter, you might think about a kayaker helmet as an all in one. Make sure you put some really good Scotchlite reflective tape at four points around the head to ensure visibility while performing all disciplines,
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  #10  
Old 08-29-2010, 04:02 PM
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WildlifeNate WildlifeNate is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Debkirk
If you are a cyclist, climber, and paddler, you can run yourself to the poorhouse fast by buying one for each discipline. All sport- specific brain buckets are impact protecting in their design, and they are designed to stay in place somewhat after an impact, but a paddling helmet will also keep your head above the water in the event you lose consciousness If your are a multi-sporter, you might think about a kayaker helmet as an all in one. Make sure you put some really good Scotchlite reflective tape at four points around the head to ensure visibility while performing all disciplines,

That's a pretty poor substitute, IMO. The kinds of impacts you'll see in a kayaking environment will not be the same as the ones you see in a bicycling environment. I would not trust my head to a helmet made for another purpose. You can find cheap bike helmets that work just as well as the expensive ones for their intended use. There's the typical cyclist style, there's the BMX style, and there's the downhill full face style. I would rather go broke buying helmets than going broke paying for treatment of head injuries.
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