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Shelters The Shelters forum is for the discussion of backpacking shelters (tents, tarps, poncho-tarps, bivy sacks,...).


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  #1  
Old 11-07-2008, 12:44 PM
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Pugslie Pugslie is offline
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Hilleberg Staika Concerns (Allak & Soulo)

Received a Staika yesterday and did a quick set-up and found what maybe 2 things that concerned me...the Allak and Soulo share the same 3 pole design so I was wondering it was also common to them.

1. 1 of the 3 poles has a slight bend in it around the apex, is this normal? If so, I assume it goes as the vestibule support pole.

2. After staking out fully and setting out and adjusting the guylines, the outer tent comes in contact with inner, is this normal? I always thought that there should never be any contact between the outer (fly) and inner tent for condensation reasons.

b.gin
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  #2  
Old 11-07-2008, 03:11 PM
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FamilyGuy FamilyGuy is offline
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1. On the Soulo, there is one slightly longer pole with a bend near the apex and it is the cross pole for the vestibule, so yes, I think you are on the right track here. Pictures maybe?

2. There is a lot of static on the tent when new. Once you get it outside (or you can wipe down the outer tent (inside) with a damp cloth) the static will leave and there will be a space between the inner and outer.
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  #3  
Old 11-07-2008, 04:13 PM
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Tipiwalter Tipiwalter is offline
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The 08 model of the Staika could be different from my model, the 06, but my poles are all straight, no factory bends. Of course, when pitched the poles bend considerably but not permanently.

I found this setup to be good: Get the wedge set up first with one pole in the black coded sleeves and one pole in the white. The last pole should be in the red coded sleeves, leaving this pole to go over the two wedge poles. Does it make a difference? Well, I like having the rectangle wedge up first before throwing the third pole up and over them.

Another thing I did was to tie a short guy line on the head and foot portion of the fly(where the metal ring is), and stake both out when settng up. This draws the fly far away from both the head and the foot section of the body of the tent. Therefore, my canopy never touches the fly except in high winds.

My only real complaint of the Staika is the umbrella fly attachment points, which I posted on the gallery here several months ago. I believe Hilleberg upgraded these awkward toggles/rings to hooks, etc. When frozen solid, they are a bear to remove. Also, in the winter and having the poles outside the tent and exposed to the snow and rain, they can freeze together easily. Now every winter before I go out I coat each pole junction in a light silicone lube from a tube that comes with my old Pur Hiker water filter. Keeps the poles moveable.
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  #4  
Old 11-07-2008, 06:31 PM
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Pugslie Pugslie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FamilyGuy
1. On the Soulo, there is one slightly longer pole with a bend near the apex and it is the cross pole for the vestibule, so yes, I think you are on the right track here. Pictures maybe?

2. There is a lot of static on the tent when new. Once you get it outside (or you can wipe down the outer tent (inside) with a damp cloth) the static will leave and there will be a space between the inner and outer.

1. Pic (Attached)

2. Static cling...I think that's it. IIRC, it was like the inner was clinging to the fly...when I seperated the two, the inner would attach itself back to the outer. Thanks FamilyGuy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tipiwalter
The 08 model of the Staika could be different from my model, the 06, but my poles are all straight, no factory bends. Of course, when pitched the poles bend considerably but not permanently.
Not sure if its an '08...bought from ********* which notes: Changes for 2006

10 mm poles
Spectra-blend guy lines
Reflectors
Note: the photos on this page are of a prior version. The only changes are those listed at the top of this box


Quote:
I found this setup to be good: Get the wedge set up first with one pole in the black coded sleeves and one pole in the white. The last pole should be in the red coded sleeves, leaving this pole to go over the two wedge poles. Does it make a difference? Well, I like having the rectangle wedge up first before throwing the third pole up and over them.


On mine Staika, the black coded sleeve equals the vestibules pole and has the bend. You are right, this pole should go up first...on my first setup try, I put that pole last and could not get the top clips to attach . Took down that pole, slid it under the red & white sleeved poles, reattached to pole holders and was able to clip quite handily. Not sure if it makes a difference which pole goes after the vestibule pole first.


Quote:
Another thing I did was to tie a short guy line on the head and foot portion of the fly(where the metal ring is), and stake both out when settng up. This draws the fly far away from both the head and the foot section of the body of the tent. Therefore, my canopy never touches the fly except in high winds.

I just pegged out those metal rings with a shepard hook stake for plus or minus the same effect. Also set out all guylines but the fly and inner still touched...this is before I realized FamilyGuy's suggestion of static cling.

Quote:
My only real complaint of the Staika is the umbrella fly attachment points, which I posted on the gallery here several months ago. I believe Hilleberg upgraded these awkward toggles/rings to hooks, etc. When frozen solid, they are a bear to remove. Also, in the winter and having the poles outside the tent and exposed to the snow and rain, they can freeze together easily. Now every winter before I go out I coat each pole junction in a light silicone lube from a tube that comes with my old Pur Hiker water filter. Keeps the poles moveable.

At least on my "newer tent", those umbrella fly toggles and rings are still used and a PITA. I'll try the silicone lube idea althou my main camping concerns for this tent is high winds and rain.
Since my interests are mainly car/basecamp camping and doing day hikes, I chose the Staika over the Allak for its supposely stronger construction/materials.

b.gin
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File Type: jpg P1000258t.jpg (56.2 KB, 37 views)
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  #5  
Old 11-07-2008, 08:49 PM
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Tipiwalter Tipiwalter is offline
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Thanks for the head's up info. On my Staika, the red coded sleeves are the vestibule sleeves, and I always out of habit put this pole in last. It crosses over the two other wedge poles and is not pre-bent. When the tent is bone dry or sitting in the sun, the black clips can be a bit difficult to attach to the poles, but when the tent is wet or moist it's not so tight. I can't understand why one of the Staika poles would be pre-bent, just doesn't make sense, but who knows?

The Staika is about the best tent I've ever owned and it has been my shelter on many backpacking trips. It's heavy but I'm used to it and like to hole up for several days in rough weather. Shelter from the storm, etc.
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  #6  
Old 11-08-2008, 07:19 PM
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Pugslie Pugslie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tipiwalter

I found this setup to be good: Get the wedge set up first with one pole in the black coded sleeves and one pole in the white. The last pole should be in the red coded sleeves, leaving this pole to go over the two wedge poles. Does it make a difference? Well, I like having the rectangle wedge up first before throwing the third pole up and over them.


I stand corrected on my earlier post on setting up the Staika. Tipiwalter's suggestions above proved quite true and his description on the colored sleeves are corrected...I had the red and black sleeves mixed up. Between the 2 setup tries I did today, I think it was easiest to get the white and black sleeved poles in and up, then attach a couple of sleeve clips on each pole end to steady the wedge. Finaly, get the 3rd pole over them.

Thanks for the tip Tipiwalter.

b.gin

BTW, that static cling is gone too.
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  #7  
Old 07-19-2014, 08:35 AM
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Tahawas Tahawas is offline
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Bought a Staika this spring

Did 4 nights in The Mosquito infested Adirondacks in June...No problem with being too hot with all of the venting options. No condensation either.
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  #8  
Old 09-18-2014, 10:10 AM
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Tahawas Tahawas is offline
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Staika gets 2 nights in the Adirondack Sewards Wilderness

Rain, in the 40's 1st night- Rain in the 30's second. Warm and dry and condensation free with my Hilleberg Staika, Big Agnes QCore Long /Wide, Feathered Friends Condor Long and 3 mil plastic ground sheet.
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  #9  
Old 11-18-2014, 02:44 PM
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JPro JPro is offline
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Length

I am strongly considering buying a Staika. One comment that I see about it from time to time is that people who sleep in 6'6" winter bags on 2-3" pads sometimes touch the inner with the foot of their bag. Have you ever had this problem?
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  #10  
Old 11-24-2014, 08:17 AM
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Tahawas Tahawas is offline
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Hey I am 5' 11" and use a Feathered Friends 6'6" and a Qcore long. The slope of the Staika is enough that I have no problems with my head touching. I have the pad closer to the head end so there is well over a foot of floor room for even storing stuff at the foot end. Granted, if a bunch of snow was piled on the tent it might sag there but I haven't been in that situation. I can tell you that despite extra weight and size, what you do get... is an incredibly good tent and you can expect it to last a lifetime.
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