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Travel Backpacking The Travel Backpacking forum is for discussion that relates directly to international backpacking (also known as independent travel). Subject matter should involve the elements that comprise this type of backpacking: budgeting, cultural tips, backpacking gear, hostels, and transportation.


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  #1  
Old 06-16-2008, 12:59 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Single Carry-On Backpack for Travel

Do you bring only a single carry-on backpack (no checked items) for your travel backpacking trips? If so, please share the model and specs. It would also be interesting to know what you do to limit what you carry -- so that it all fits.

Reality
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  #2  
Old 06-16-2008, 02:58 PM
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Trudy Trudy is offline
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Have you seen the size of some of the luggage people get away with bringing on the plane?
Then there is a frenzy while they try to find a place to stow it...another frenzy when the plane lands and they have to retrieve it.
Any of my packs are way smaller than the luggage with wheels that the airlines allow.
The last few years I have been sending small boxes ahead to my destination. Usually to a post office. These contain a few extra items that I may not want to carry, either due to restriction or their bulk. Examples: vegetarian meals for 8 days, tools, stoves.
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  #3  
Old 06-21-2008, 01:46 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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The Six Moon Designs Traveler pack looks to be a good option.

It's said to be sized to fit in a typical plane's overhead compartment. I'd like to know the exact outside dimensions (full) for this pack.

It appears to have some generous hipbelt pockets too - something that's missing on the traditional travel bags that convert into backpacks.

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Old 06-30-2008, 05:55 AM
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captn captn is offline
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I've used a conduit several times with no problems.

I put all my "forbidden stuff", like pocket knives, tent stakes, first aid kit, treking poles, and even food in a small duffle bag that I check. I figure that I can find that stuff at my destination if I have to, but my clothes, poncho, sleeping bag, and pack are hard to replace .... they stay with me.
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  #5  
Old 08-17-2008, 05:24 PM
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Cossoft Cossoft is offline
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Under current stupidity rules I would suggest that this is impossible. You need to take a decent knife at least. You need one to cut Spam, to cut general meat, to split firewood. If you have a go at some fishing, how will you clean the fish?

I personally use a Frosts Mora that is the current issue to the Swedish army. World class steel for £8. Unbeatable.
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  #6  
Old 09-15-2008, 05:44 PM
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Surveyor Surveyor is offline
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The Jam2 and I head out for Scotland tomorrow. I'll let everyone know how it goes. It's cinched down fairly tight. I'm carrying some things in my "personal bag" which will be my daypack.
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Old 09-21-2008, 02:36 PM
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Surveyor Surveyor is offline
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So far so good with the Jam2. It fits well in both the luggage bins and the overhead racks on the Scotrail. I've made it to Inverness and will be going to Skye tomorrow by rail.

I'm, independent traveling, not camping out. So I don't have the items that would raise security's eyebrows.
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  #8  
Old 09-29-2008, 11:48 PM
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Surveyor Surveyor is offline
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Just returned from our trip. The Jam2 worked very well for what we needed, which was keep all our stuff together and not have to check baggage.

Last edited by Surveyor : 09-29-2008 at 11:49 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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  #9  
Old 10-29-2008, 11:12 AM
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lazersgopewpew lazersgopewpew is offline
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By far the best option I've ever seen for a travel pack is the MEI Voyageur. I'm currently waiting to get mine since they are mostly handmade by a single individual out in California.

I work for the airlines and the measurements for this bag are carry-on allowable.

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  #10  
Old 03-21-2016, 01:11 AM
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timcarouge timcarouge is offline
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Lessons learned from travelling 6-8 months a year

I backpack travel all over the world 6-8 months a year with a pack that is 20liters, which is about half the allowed carryon size. The total weight is under 4kg (9lbs) in warm regions, 5kg (11lbs) in temperate regions.
I've had some regrettable experiences...

STAKES
- titanium wire tent stakes confiscated twice
- titanium V stakes confiscated
- Easton aluminum tube stakes confiscated (even though I said they were like knitting needles, which are allowed)

KNIFE
- miniature Swiss Army Knife (SAK) with a blade size well within the allowance confiscated (I suspect the guy wanted it for himself, it had a pen, light, screwdriver etc)
- Leatherman Squirt, with an allowed blade size, confiscated
- forgotten my knife and had to check-in just my Swiss Army Knife wrapped in a small cardboard box and plastic bag that the counter person found for me.
- had to book a place to stay at my destination, just to be able to send my SAK ahead
Now I use a custom SAK I had made by this guy for $90 that does not have a knife blade with pliers (use them as a pot holder), scissors, multican/bottle opener, wood saw, metal saw, cork screw (I love my wine), pen, tweezers, toothpick. Then I buy a cheap serrated knife when I get to my destination.

COOKING
After wasting lots of time searching for different fuels (butane, gas, white gas, kerosene, etc) I now bring a titanium alcohol stove (Vargo Decagon), and buy fuel at destination. The challenge is knowing what the name is locally, but thanks to google translate, it only took me 5 minutes to find it on a recent trip to Burma. It's often found in pharmacies.

takeC@re,
Tim
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