Practical Backpacking™ Forums

Welcome to Practical Backpacking™ Forums (PBF).

You are currently viewing PBF as a guest which has limited access. By becoming a PBF member, you will have full access to view and participate in tens of thousands of informative discussions, to view links and attachments (photos), and will gain access to other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free! Click to Become a PBF Member! Be sure to also explore the Practical Backpacking Podcast.


Go Back   Practical Backpacking™ Forums > Practical Backpacking™ General Outdoors (Backpacking Related) > Wilderness Photography
HOME FAQ PBF GUIDELINES BLOG PODCAST GALLERY STORE CALENDAR Mark Forums Read

Wilderness Photography The Wilderness Photography forum is for the discussion of photography (videography) gear, experience, and technique as it directly relates to wilderness photography. PBF members may also post self-owned photos that have been uploaded to the PB Gallery or as post attachments. Offsite links and offsite photos are prohibited. Please see ("sticky") instructional post located at top of threads.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 02-15-2008, 09:17 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
tjd tjd is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: CT/NY Border
Posts: 58
I've carried my EOS-5D on day hikes up some peaks here in the north east to get some great shots (13MP). In that case, I tend to just wear it around my neck. it's not a very good solution. Other times, I've wrapped it in my fleece in my pack. One thing I've thought of is trying a front pack for the camera.

A different solution that works well is a good compact camera so you don't need the bulk of the SLR. I use a A650-IS (12 MP) for this case. While the stock firmware is limited in features (no RAW support), CHKD is available now for the 650IS.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 02-15-2008, 09:32 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Xrider Xrider is offline
Practical Backpacking™ New Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Shenandoah Valley VA
Posts: 14
I use the Marmot Dry Rib available.

I carry my Pentax DSLR with a compact 18-200mm lens attached. I think it might meet your needs pretty well. I usually put the camera in a gallon ziplock "just in case" it gets soggy, but it worked very well even bushwacking Denali last summer.

Xrider
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 02-15-2008, 09:39 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
drbryanj drbryanj is offline
Practical Backpacking™ New Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 4
We're going to be on the trail for 2 weeks, so carrying it around my neck is not an option. I was looking at a Lowepro orion mini hip pack. I think I'll bring my backpack to the camera store and try them both on together.
Reply With Quote
Please Click to Visit These Sites
  #14  
Old 02-15-2008, 09:39 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Photograhiker Photograhiker is offline
Practical Backpacking™ New Member
Backpack: Gorilla
Sleeping Gear: Synth. quilt/Ridgerest/Downmat 7
Shelter: Scarp 2/Shangri-La 3
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Ohio
Posts: 6
I sometimes wear my SLR with a neck strap and a velcro strap (used by cyclists for securing pants leg) or two securing it to the sternum strap of my pack.

Another option would be a standard belt pouch worn on the pack hip strap, or a separate butt pack worn on the front.

There are also chest pouches out there: Sundog Harness
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 02-15-2008, 09:44 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
tjd tjd is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: CT/NY Border
Posts: 58
I don't know how the hip pack will work. The SLR might not be the best option for a long time out. Thats why I like the compact option for trips. The camera fits into the hip belt pocket on my ULA catalyst easily.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 02-15-2008, 06:06 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Remnant Remnant is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 256
While it works for DustyRoads, I for one hate sternum straps...I wish I didn't, as his rig looks like the best of all worlds as far as accessability to the camera...you'll take more pix that way!
I've hauled two 35mm bodies around the neck, plus a hip-belt with the 645 and the tripod clipped onto the backpack...camera gear weight was more than what was in the daypack

But in those days, the reason I was BP'ing in the first place was to get to where I could take photos of things not often seen...with the upgrade in technology ostensibly you (with an up-scale point and shoot) could do what I used to try to do with 35mm, ain't gonna say whether you can beat MF yet
and you can have the camera in your waist-belt pocket...a far cry from what I and alot of other folks have had to deal with in the "pre-digital" years...check out Reality's latest post on the Gear Workshop section. He shows a way to do away with the
tripod (for most folks <G>)
Reply With Quote
Please Consider PBF Partners
The Paleo Recipe Book
  #17  
Old 02-16-2008, 01:25 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Reality Reality is offline
PBF Administrator & PB Podcast Host
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Oregon
Posts: 4,954
Quote:
Originally Posted by Remnant
He shows a way to do away with the
tripod (for most folks)
A tripod may still be useful for reasons other than image stabilization - e.g. for those who want to be in the shot, time exposures...

If anyone has photos, feel free to post them showing pack rigging for carrying camera equipment.

Reality
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 07-20-2010, 01:57 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
GGervin GGervin is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Forums Moderator
Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
Sleeping Gear: REI ThermoPod +0 mummy, MH 3D +40 mummy
Shelter: SD Superflash, GoLite Hut 1
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: California
Posts: 436
If I'm using an SLR, I probably have a big lens on it. I usually keep the camera in the pack until I anticipate I might need it. The assembled rig is a shoulder stock, camera body, and the lens (either a 400 f/5.6 or a 300 f/2.8). The 400 rig weighs 4lb 15oz., and is 24" long. The 300 rig weighs 8lb 10oz. Clearly, this is pretty extreme, and about the limit I can manage on a packing trip.

When it's out, I carry the camera rig on the beefiest, widest neoprene neck strap Op-Tech makes. That's the only "special" carrying gear I use. I put the strap over my neck, and then put my right arm through the neck strap so the camera hangs at my right side, under and a little behind my arm (the strap runs diagonally across my chest). Since I put the camera on after I put on my pack, the shoulder strap rides on my left shoulder and behind my neck across the very top of the backpack's shoulder straps, so the weight is borne by both my left shoulder and the pack's suspension system. The neoprene tends not to slide, so the camera stays relatively stable. The arrangement isn't so comfortable that I'd want to wear it there when the camera isn't needed, but it's tolerable for as long as I need it to be. I did this with the 400 from Rancheria Falls to Tiltil Valley in the Hetch Hetchy area - about 6.5mi round trip and 1400ft of trail climbing. I used to carry the SLR and normal/wide lenses this way when I was doing landscapes in 35mm, and it worked just as well (in fact better, since the weight factor was much lower). My last trip, I carried a cheap compact digital, and it rode fine there for miles.

I always use trekking poles, and this doesn't interfere with good pole technique at all. In fact, the camera/lens stays in place pretty well with minimal swaying.

I don't imaging too many people want to deal with such extreme photo gear. I'm sure minimalist ultra-lighters are thanking their luck stars for compact digitals with 24x optical zooms even as they read this. My point is that simply looping the camera over one shoulder so that it sits under an arm works well for me under even the most extreme uses. It keeps the camera readily deployable, is comfortable (depending on lens weight of course), and doesn't interfere with normal hiking including trekking pole use.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 07-20-2010, 12:17 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
for last christmas i got my wife a bag/case by m-rock. spendy but worth it, totally worth it. it's set up for a wide number of different carry options; backpack, chest pack, shoulder bag and a few others indcluding hip carry and attaching to a larger pack.

they're also expandable with attachments into fairly thorough(yet modular) kits.

like i said, worth it.
Reply With Quote
Your Visit to These Sites Helps Support PBF
  #20  
Old 07-20-2010, 05:03 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
traildadd traildadd is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 33
I use a Digital Holster by Think Tank Photo. I got the optional harness which is two straps that cross behind my back. The holster has a zipper that allows it to expand in length when using long lenses. It also comes with a rain cover that keeps it dry, at least for a while in the rain. It is comfortable and keeps the camera very handy.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Methods of On-Body (on Person) Carry for Survival Items Reality Backpacker's Health & Safety 34 03-05-2013 12:26 PM
Where do you carry your pad? Perkolady Sleeping Gear 27 05-02-2009 09:41 AM
How do you carry your camping gear? WildlifeNate Bikepacking 22 02-03-2009 10:23 AM
Packing large amounts of water question yippikiyo Backpacker's Health & Safety 5 06-29-2007 07:32 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:46 AM.

Backpacking Forums


Powered by vBulletin Version 3.5.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2006-2017 Practical Backpacking™
Practical Backpacking is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacker is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Podcast is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Magazine is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™