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Paddling The Paddling forum is for discussion that relates directly to wilderness paddling (canoeing, kayaking, rafting). Topics focus on trip planning and gear.


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  #1  
Old 07-26-2007, 08:51 AM
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WildlifeNate WildlifeNate is offline
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Canoe outfitting

YES! I finally managed to seal the deal on a canoe! I found someone selling a We-no-nah Aurora (versatile 16ft boat) in Baltimore. After some e-mails and a phone call, we agreed on the terms of the deal ($575 for a nearly new-looking boat) and now we're working out when and where we'll be meeting so I can pick up the boat. Looks like I'll be getting it on Saturday afternoon, so Sunday is all mine to take the boat out on the water.

This boat is arriving to me with absolutely ZERO outfitting, though. This is both a good thing and a bad thing. At any rate, I know of a few things I want for it, but I'm not sure about others. I'm pretty sure I want to get an adjustable stern footbrace (I can probably get/order it from my local Wenonah dealer). Also, since I'll be doing some river trips in this boat, I'm pretty sure I want to get some float bags. I'm also thinking about the possibility of a spray deck, but I don't know any companies that sell them aside from Mad River's IQ system.

I also am going to need various ways to secure gear to the boat...extra paddle, probably a number of D-rings on the hull for other items, some container or bag to attach to the kneeling thwart, etc.

Anyone have any good places to look for this sort of thing? I don't recall seeing a lot of outfitting gear at my nearest canoe outfitter, though I'll have to look again now I've got a boat. I'm also curious about how to attach a number of these things. Most boats I've seen with lots of outfitting have had vinyl or wood gunwales. This boat has aluminum gunwales. Great for keeping the weight down, but you can't just bury a screw into it to secure cleats for lashing.
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  #2  
Old 07-26-2007, 09:46 AM
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Seeker Seeker is offline
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haven't done a canoe trip in a few years, so maybe there's more fancy stuff now, but i just always lashed my gear to the cross braces with some sort of 3/16ths to 1/4 inch nylon line. you don't need cleats. use a truckers hitch to get it good and tight. i always tried to keep my stuff as low as possible, below the gunwhale, for balance. (an ice chest can sit kinda high though.)

you can use a rivet gun to attach snaps to the middle section for a spray skirt. not sure where to find one exactly, but google is always helpful. i just set a tarp over my stuff before i lashed it down, and that worked fine. an ice chest and a few milk crates were about all i needed for holding gear. everything else got an 'idiot cord', or safety leash or whatever you want to call it, in case i tipped over. again, the cross braces were useful for tying those off to.

some people use a fancy bilge pump for removing water, but a large car-washing sponge and a 'scoop' made from a bleach bottle are all you really need, and cheap. if you don't want water touching any of your baggage, you can find some thin branches and lay them down first, like a shipping pallet, and set your stuff on top.

i prefer to kneel on the bottom and lean my butt against the crossbrace most of the time. i move up to the seat every once in awhle to stretch my legs, but it's more stable to ride lower. you can make a seat cushion/kneeling pad from a blue foam pad. as i get older, i find the 'snap on' back rests are a nice break from kneeling too, but they're not critical, especially on young backs.

get a piece of 3/8" poly-something-or-other line; the stuff that floats-they make water ski tow ropes with it, about 20-30' long. cut it in half and tie 10-15' of it to each end of the canoe. you can rig up some sort of system (the ponytail ties with the two balls on them work great) to keep them untangled.

that's all i can think of right now.
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  #3  
Old 07-26-2007, 10:19 AM
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WildlifeNate WildlifeNate is offline
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I've always tied everything off to the yoke or thwarts in borrowed or rental boats in the past, but I don't care much for that system. It's a bit clumsy, IMO, and just doesn't keep gear as stable. I want to really be able to hold my stuff in nice and snug so it doesn't slide around when I'm in a rapid or if the dog decides to move around and rock the boat. I also want to be able to place everything exactly where I want it to adjust for trim when I decide to paddle solo. For that purpose, I think D-rings glued to the hull would work fine.

The cleats I will need for lashing float bags in the bow and stern and MAYBE amidships. I've not decided if I want or will need the big pillow bag in the middle, but bare minimum I want to be able to put bags in the bow & stern.

I will more than likely use spray decks when doing open water paddling. It's not something I plan on using often, and I probably won't get it immediately, anyway. But still, it seems like a useful accessory to reduce windage on open water. I want to start looking into the various options now so that when I am ready to get one, I know what to get.

I was definitely going to get painters to attach bow & stern. I forgot to mention it, and thanks for the tip on length, too. I'll probably buy it from either Home Depot or West Marine in bulk...depending on who has the best price.

I've never tried paddling in a kneeling position, but now that I've got a boat (especially one that reportedly handles very well paddled that way), I think I'm going to take the time to learn. I'll probably start with a blue foam pad (I've got an old one I can cut up) before I go permanently gluing minicell to the hull. Still, I do like to paddle seated, especially when I don't feel like cranking out miles, so I'll probably look for a nice backrest (I don't like the soft canoe/stadium chairs, but a supportive plastic backrest would be nice). Also, I think combining a backrest with a footbrace will really help improve efficiency when paddling seated.

Yeah, I don't feel the need for a fancy bilge pump for a canoe. I can see their utility in a kayak, but I'll probably just cut up a plastic jug for one and use a packtowl for minor mopping.
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Old 07-26-2007, 09:34 PM
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Chaos Chaos is offline
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Check out NRS (Northwest River Supplies). They’re more geared towards rafting, but they do carry floatation bags, minicell foam, ‘D-rings’ and adhesives.
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  #5  
Old 07-26-2007, 11:03 PM
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big_load big_load is offline
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NRS is good. One of my favorites is Piragis. I doubt many people canoe the BWCA without at least stopping in for a look around.
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  #6  
Old 09-22-2007, 09:01 PM
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WildlifeNate WildlifeNate is offline
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Well, it looks like I've got some more moving water paddling trips on the schedule so I figured it was time to get my canoe outfitted to handle the conditions. For this, I'm just starting with some flotation and some gear organization.

I went with Rutabaga as my retailer of choice. My local paddling retailers don't really carry much for canoes. Pittsburgh is more of a kayak market, it seems.

I started with the North Water Air Bag Tie Down Kit.

I got NRS air bags, too. For the type of WW (class II tops) that I do, end flotation is enough. Center bags aren't really necessary.

Finally, I got a couple Granite Gear bags. One is an underseat bag for the bow, and the other is a thwart bag for the stern.

Now all I need to do is figure out a way to rig up my jolly roger and I'll be all set. BTW, the boat has been christened "The Flying Dragon" and I'm searching for the perfect dragon head profile picture to have made into a vinyl decal to stick to either side of the bow. I suppose the possibility exists to get the whole body of the dragon done up if I find the right image, but to do it the way I want it, I think it would be rather large (and expensive).
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  #7  
Old 12-31-2008, 02:45 PM
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Brer_Fox Brer_Fox is offline
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I just brought home a late Christmas present - a Ouachita 17' aluminum canoe in nearly perfect condition! We agreed on a price of $250 for the canoe, 3 paddles and 4 orange life jackets.

Our Scout Troop has a 4 day/ 3 night trip planned to the Okefenokee Swamp in February. We were planning on renting canoes out of Stephen Foster. Their prices are jumping from $30/night to $50/night tomorrow (Jan. 1). I figured for that price I could just about buy one. We have a young Troop, so we should get plenty of use out of the canoe over the next 10 years.

Our next big trip is a 10-day canoe trek at Northern Tier (Boundary Waters) this summer (2009). We are going out of Charles Summers Canoe Base. The Okefenokee trip should be a good shakedown for us.

Nothing like the excitement of an upcoming trip to put a spring in your step!
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  #8  
Old 08-17-2010, 06:21 PM
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Ralph Ralph is offline
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I've had several canoes over the years: aluminum tandem 13', Mad River fiberglass tandem 13', cedar strip solo 9' (I'm sorry now I sold that one), Old Town Pack 12' solo modified to a tandem and lately a plastic folding open kayak solo 8'.

Outfitting begins with the painters. Most synthetics will float to some degree. I don't particulary care for the stiff, braided polypropylene, preferring the softer hand of nylon braid. I use 20' painters both bow and stern that allow me to tow or line the canoe over shallows. If the boat doesn't come with painter points I mount rings or loops on the deck. The painter is coiled and thrust into loops of small diameter shock-cord run through two holes drilled through the deck plates. Note: hardware is either solid brass or stainless steel.

If the canoe doesn't have one I will mount a portage yoke. The Pack canoe is the only canoe that had no thwart at the balance point so I made a removable yoke that is mounted with hand screws to the gunwales. The open kayak needs no yoke. It weighs 11 lbs. and folds like an acordion into a 8' x 9" x 6" package and can be easily carried on my shoulder.

I mount cleats or rings as tie points in addition to using thwarts and seat bars for this purpose. If I can't screw or rivet the ties I use glue-on pads and rings. My local dollar store sells large clear plastic suction cups with plastic hooks for hanging plants or wreaths in windows. With the hook removed the suction cup has a center stud with a large hole in it. These can be glued to the interior at appropriate places for mounting spare paddles and other gear either with cord or with 1" double-sided Velcro.

I use a lightweight, telescopic paddle/boat hook as a spare.

I make most of my own gear, for the canoes I use 1000d Cordura and have seat pads with flip-down side pockets and thin underseat bags, a thwart bag with belt to use as a fanny pack, and several canoe packs, wide and squat with one chest pack carried by clipping to the D-rings on the straps of the main pack. I generally have two packs that allow me to adjust the trim to the conditions.

I'm in the process of designing gear for the kayak. The seat is flat plastic with a fold-down back. I will need a padded seat and back (I'm too old to be uncomfortable) and a small utility pack that will ride on the seat back.

Additional small items include a small baler made from a plastic jug, a baler sponge, PFD(s), a small anchor and a drift anchor (for fishing from the boat) and a throw bag.
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  #9  
Old 09-30-2010, 02:39 PM
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Laurie Laurie is offline
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I'm a little late posting here but I figured I'd mention how our canoe is set up. We use a bow bag from Granite Gear for emergency items. We have a portage yoke and painters. Other than that the We-no-nah Prospector is pretty much bare bones - she's flexcore kevlar with wood trim. I carry a bailer kit that I biner to the stern's carry thwart. In the bailer kit is a flashlight, throw rope and spare whistle which are all required by Canadian law. The packs do not get tied into the canoe. We aren't doing extreme whitewater so we don't need float bags or to tie the gear in. I carry paddles in a paddle bag I stitched up and it gets binered to the shoulder strap of my pack. It allows me to carry 3 paddles (1 for each of us and a spare) and our fishing gear, hands free. It also keeps the boat lighter for portages (I'm notorious for my 2 and 3 mile portages).
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  #10  
Old 12-20-2010, 08:37 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laurie
We use a bow bag from Granite Gear for emergency items.
How has that bag been working for you?

Reality
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