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Backpacker's Health & Safety The Backpacker's Health & Safety forum is for the discussion of health and safety/survival issues that directly relate to backpackers.


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  #1  
Old 11-21-2006, 11:22 AM
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JerryW JerryW is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Illinois
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Carrying Identification / ID

When hiking or bicycling I typically carry my drivers license, but if I was to get separated from it somehow, I want a passerby to be able to help me if I was to become incapacitated (or worse). For a few years I've been wearing a product called RoadID. I like the dogtag style, but there are also wrist bands and shoe tags.

On the tag there is room to list name, hometown, emergency phone numbers, known allergies and medical conditions, etc.

Since I'm wearing it, it will always be available, if the need arrises.

I'm not affiliated with this company in any way, I just want to make everyone aware of this product. I know it gives my family a little more peace of mind when I'm out on one of my adventures.

Jerry
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  #2  
Old 11-21-2006, 03:09 PM
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food food is offline
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Join Date: May 2006
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dog tag

Jerry,

I have added my health insurance carrier and ID.

Also blood type.

I look a lot like a homeless person while hiking - maybe this will prevent "dumping".
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  #3  
Old 11-22-2006, 02:37 PM
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Forgetful Forgetful is offline
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I use dog tags. One site lets you put different information on each tag. The cost is something like $6 or $8 per pair of tags including ss chain.

Order the tags with the information you want - name, address, phone number, medical info (meds, Dr phone, etc). 5 lines of 15 characters per tag, that gives you 10 lines of 15 characters. You can squeeze a lot in that.

Then take some clear silicone sealant, smear a little silicone sealant on the back of one tag (enough to leave no air holes), place the tags back to back, press together, wipe excess sealant off edges and clamp in place for 24 hrs. I use the DAP silicone sealant with the Microban just to be sure nothing grows between the tags.

I used the ss chains sent with the tags for a long time, but changed to the dyneema guy line cord sold by BPL. Reduced the weight significantly. Also, the bright yellow will catch a medical pros attention. If you are worried that the cord may not break if caught on something, use a 1" section of the ss chain with the little connectors on each end. Then tie an overhand knot on each end of the cord and slip into the connectors. In the middle of the cord tie an alpine butterfly (linemans) knot and use a girth hitch for the tags.

Carry around your neck at all times - instant identification. The ss tags and dyneema cord don't absorb water, so the shower is no problem. I never take mine off - that I way never have to remember to put back on. Went to the ER once - they wanted my pertinent medical info - just took the tags out and they had what they wanted, including my medical record number at my HMO in case they wanted to confer with my physician.
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Old 11-25-2006, 02:31 PM
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Brotzie Brotzie is offline
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I wear IFF tags on my clothing. If you're not used to these, they show blood type (A POS) and allergies (NKA - no known allergies); mine also have medic designator in the middle and qual across the top (ADFA - advanced first aid, = ambulance technician). The medic patch is in high-lustre thread - the photo was taken in ambient light on a phone cam, no flash despite how it looks.

Granted, IFF tags don't have all your contact info, but for immediate care it's all you need (speaking from both sides of the medical fence) and there's no need to delve.
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  #5  
Old 11-26-2006, 02:30 PM
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Bearpaw Bearpaw is offline
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I hope this doesn't scare folks too much, but I have a more extreme personal ID system.

While in the Marine Corps, I worked in one of the few airborne (parachute) units in the Corps. My unit specialized in small teams dedicated to calling in naval gunfire and a host of close air supports options. We might be attached to U. S. Army units (which have no assets for calling in naval gunfire and only the ability to call in helicopter support from the air) or allied units (the Brits, Dutch, Italians, Norwegians, Poles, Romanians, etc - I worked with all these guys at one time or another.) And some times we worked independently as short range reconnaissance assets.

Any way, because of the airborne role, we never wore any thing around our necks. So we had one dog tag in the laces of our right boot and the main necklace ran through a belt loop with the tag in a pants pocket. Because we worked with very heavy ordinance (up to 2700 pounds from a battleship main round), the prospect of body parts from the upper body being separated from the lower body were always a possibility (and actually happened once that I observed). Thus many Marines in my unit got a "meat tag", their dog tag info including name, SSN, blood type, known allergies, and faith tattooed on their left rib cage. I was one of those Marines who still bears the info today......

So unless my body is charred beyond recognition, I figure any one finding my remains will have a clue as to who I am. If I'm found unconscious, a rescuer has some barebones info to work with. I'm not recommending folks rush out and do this, but I have to admit, it's actually a bit comforting to know that what started out as a morbid acceptance of our own mortality might also be helpful in life as in death.
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  #6  
Old 11-26-2006, 04:36 PM
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aroth87 aroth87 is offline
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Wow Bearpaw, that's pretty hardcore... My ID isn't nearly as extreme (cool might be a good word for it too), I put my driver's liscense, health insurance card, $20 in cash, and a list of emergency contacts in a small ziploc bag and keep it in my pocket at all times. After reading this thread, I'm going to add blood type, allergies, and a medical contact to it as well.

Adam
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  #7  
Old 11-28-2006, 10:38 AM
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jniehof jniehof is offline
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I carry driver's license and health insurance card in the backcountry; this thread reminds me I should add a card with my parents' phone (otherwise there'd be no way to figure out how to contact them) and my blood type/NKA (and maybe a "for the sake of all that is holy, don't give me morphine.")

I do not carry ID when cycling unless I'll need it at the end of my trip; this is a choice of advocacy rather then practicality.
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  #8  
Old 11-28-2006, 04:22 PM
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Brotzie Brotzie is offline
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Over here we've also instituted a protocol (since the 7/7 subway bombings) of putting contact numbers in our cellphones prefixed "ICE" (e.g., "ICE 1 - Jane - wife", "ICE 2 - Wilma - mum", etc.) so medics or, heaven forfend, casualty bureaux can easily find them. ICE stands for "In Case of Emergency". Now very widely adopted over here, in & around London at least.
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  #9  
Old 11-29-2006, 02:11 PM
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SixBravo SixBravo is offline
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I've done dogtags for a long time. Never been in the military, but I did do a little bit of SAR work co-piloting UH-1H's with the Civil Air Patrol when I was 18/19. Got to know what was important.

My tags look like this:
Full Name + M.I.
SSN
Type O+, NKA
Health Care Provider
ICE Contact Phone #

Long story short, we ended up flying MedEvac (as opposed to just SAR) one afternoon. We had a gentleman involved in a hunting accident who's brother had shot him (they initially were completely lost and called this in on a cell phone). Brother knew his blood type and another allergy I can't recall. The tech had blood ready when we flew out and picked him up. It was a bad scene, but I can tell you that having that info and blood ready probably saved that gentleman's life.
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  #10  
Old 12-20-2006, 03:57 PM
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Chaos Chaos is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearpaw
I hope this doesn't scare folks too much, but I have a more extreme personal ID system...cut...
Thus many Marines in my unit got a "meat tag", their dog tag info including name, SSN, blood type, known allergies, and faith tattooed on their left rib cage. I was one of those Marines who still bears the info today......
A sharpie can be used as a ‘temporary’ tattoo while venturing out.
Write your SSN, blood-type and known allergies on your forearm or somewhere where it will (hopefully) be noticed.
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